Contact Us Sitemap Privacy Policy Communication Policy Social Media Policy

What's On - Archive

Click to see what's on in these sections


[Online Talk] Wagashi - A Cultural Sweet Feast for the Eyes new
Kobanashi Workshop for Educators – Sharing Teaching Practices and Learning
Japanese Documentary Filmmaker Haneda Sumiko: Authorship and Gender Discourses new
[Online Talk] Rendering Culture & Conveying Nuance: How Translators Read Japanese Poetry
[Online Talk] Women's Voices and Women's Verses
Nihongo Cup 2021 Finals Day new
[Online Event] Competing Visions of Modernity: Architects who Changed Japan
セカンダリー日本語教師のためのワークショップ - Online Workshop for Secondary School Teachers: How do we equip our students with 21st century skills
[Online Talk] Designs That Defined Modern Japan new
[Online Event] Reframing Japanese Narratives for the UK Stage new
[Online Talk] The Pursuit for New Aesthetics - An Architectural Talk with HIRANO Toshiki new
Japanese Artists at the Architecture Film Festival London
[Online Event] Delving Into ' Grave of the Fireflies' with Alex Dudok de Wit new
[Online Talk] Art In Motion - Creatives Who Have Transitioned to Video Artistry new
Local Project Support Programme 2021-2022 Online Seminar and Q&A Session – Applications Open!
Applications for the Japanese Local Project Support Programme 2021-2022 are open!
11 Stories on Distanced Relationships: Contemporary Art From Japan - An Online Exhibition new
The Third Online Get-Together For Secondary School Teachers セカンダリー日本語教師のための第3回ONLINE懇親会
BATJ-JF Spring Seminar - Exploring and Reflecting on Classes in an Online Setting: How can we cultivate ICT literacy for teachers of Japanese?
The 16th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students - Finals Day / 第16回大学生のための日本語スピーチ・コンテスト 決勝大会
Postgraduate Workshop 2021
The Place of Japanese Cinema in the UK
The Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2021 Online Special - Talk Series
The Second Zoom Online Get-Together
(in)Animate Objects - the Contemporary Puppetry of Nakamura Aya new
Nihongo Cup 2021 - Applications Open! new
Japan Society Sixth Form Japan Week 2020 - Japan Foundation Online Japanese Language Workshop for Students
The Art of the Pinch: A Lecture and Demonstration on Tsumami Zaiku new
A Story in Four Frames - Japanese Yonkoma Manga new
Creativity and Designing JRPG (Japanese Role-Playing Games) new
“Course on the Application of ICT for Teachers - Learning ICT Literacy Through Practice”
Game + Culture: Co-evolution of Japanese Video Games and Society new
Kobanashi Workshop for Educators – Kobanashi Performance Instruction Methods to Teach Japanese Language Learners
Spirits of Action: Japanese Manga and Sports new
Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival Screenings and Special Talk Events new
Carving Out Beauty - The Life and Work of Munakata Shiko new
Kimono Crossing the Sea - Its Power to Inspire Imagination and Creativity new
Sayaka Murata Exclusive Recorded Interview at Cheltenham Literature Festival + LIVE Q&A
Japan Foundation at Japan Matsuri 2020 new
Colouring for the Future - From a Kutani Porcelain Studio new
The 16th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students new
‘Private Rehearsals’ – A Virtual Reading
Conjuring A Sense of Movement - Japanese Graphic Designers And Sports Posters
Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk Exhibition at the V&A
Up-Close and Personal: Curators' Treasures
Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) July 2020
Born Into A Noh Family: How the New Generation is Keeping the Tradition Alive
Nihongo Cup 2020 - Finals Day
Nihongo Cup 2020
Rakugo Performance and Introductory Lecture for Japanese Language Education and Japanese Intellectual Studies
How Do They Read? Voices and Practices of Japanese Literature Translators
Ninja: Their Philosophies and Duties - A Talk by Prof Yuji Yamada
Ninja: Their Philosophies and Duties - A Talk by Professor Yuji Yamada new
Yonkoma manga: A workshop led by Shango
Free Japanese Film Streaming!
[CANCELLED] Guided Tour and Talk The Superlative Artistry of Japan touring exhibition
[CANCELLED] Director Talk with Maeda Tetsu
[CANCELLED] Manga Workshop Masterclass with Shango Part of The Superlative Artistry of Japan touring exhibition
March 2020 – BATJ and JF Spring Seminar: Using Drama as a Method of Education
Women and Sport in Japan
Artist Talk by Iwasaki Takahiro
The Fifteenth Japanese Speech Contest for University Students
New A-Level Workshop!『Motto Yomu CHIKARA』Workshop Part2 - Material Development
Seikatsu Kogei: Objects For Intentional Living Exhibition Organised by The Japan Foundation, Sydney
Japan Foundation/BAJS Japanese Studies Postgraduate Workshop 2020: Publishing Your Research
Twenty-First Century Perspectives on Kazuo Ishiguro – an international conference
Every Day A Good Day Screening
Preview Event for JFTFP20
The Japan Foundation Touring Exhibition:
The Superlative Artistry of Japan
Japanese Online Course for Teachers
Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) December 2019
A Reading Performance of Pearl and Dagger at The Other Palace
Experience Japan Exhibition 2019
Japan Foundation at the Language Show London 2019
Fogscape #03238 Installation at Lumiere Durham 2019
Japanese Education Workshop - Sharing Teaching Ideas for Creative Japanese Language Activities in Classrooms
Screening of Singing Lovebirds (1939)
Author Talk with Kanako Nishi
Okinawan Art in its Regional Context
Fabula Collective - Ley Line
Animator Talk with Takeshi Yashiro
Unite Wales and Japan: Experience Japan and the Rugby World Cup
UK-JAPAN Bridge Together Project
Nara: Faith and Renewal – An International Symposium
Call For Applications: Europe-Japan Intellectual Exchange Session 2019
Japan Foundation at Japan Matsuri 2019
An Introduction to Japanese Kagura by Professor Terence Lancashire
Iwami Kagura Dance Performances come to the UK!
From the Dust of This Wretched Earth
Japanese Avant-garde and Experimental Film Festival 2019
MODE 2019 - Performances by Yosuke Fujita and ASUNA
Anime's Human Machines
Naomi Kawase: In Focus
at the Open City Documentary Festival
Joint East Asian Studies Conference 2019
Cardiff University Japanese Education Seminar
The 15th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students
Artist Talk by Keiko Takemiya
All You May Want to Know About Shojo Manga
A Lecture by Tomoko Yamada
What is Manga?
MANGA in a global society: the origins and development of a genre – Special Lecture with Fusanosuke Natsume, Manga Critic and Columnist
Summer Explorers 2019
THE鍵KEY performance
Summer Explorers 2019! Manga based film mini season
Manga Speaks Japanese!
Japan Youth Challenge 2019
The Chief, The Missionary, His Wife & Her Brother
Music & Manga: A Vision of Sound
Kaku Hayashi at International Ceramics Festival
Kansai Yamamoto: More is more
Leicestershire Young Ambassador Japan Conference
Artist Talk by Nobuko Tsuchiya
Pre-Summer Explorers! 2019
Nihongo Cup 2019 - Finals Day
Nihongo Cup 2019
Solo Exhibition by Nobuko Tsuchiya
at Yorkshire Sculpture International 2019
Love and Desire Between Women in Girls' manga
Japanese Photography Revisited:
Talk by Dr Lena Fritsch and Miho Kajioka
Japan Information Day 2019
Reopening the Opening of Japan: A Two-Day International Conference to Mark the 150th Anniversary of the Meiji Ishin
Events at the Flatpack Festival 2019
Japanese Children's Day in Orkney
A Visual Feast - The Culinary Microcosm of the Japanese Lunch Box
Japan Foundation and British Association for Teachers of Japanese Spring Seminar
Artist Talk by Kohei Nawa
Damien Jalet & Kohei Nawa — Vessel
Still Walking + Q&A with Hirokazu Kore-eda
Wakan: The Colourful Life of Japanese Herbs
From Organic Dyeing to Bath Salts
A Timeless Pallette:
The Story of wa no iro - Japanese Colours
Dance Beyond Movement: Talk with Saburo Teshigawara & Rihoko Sato (KARAS)
A Talk by Yukiko Mishima (Director of Dear Etranger)
Hand in Hand
Japan Foundation/BAJS Japanese Studies Postgraduate Workshop 2019: Career Progression
Japanese Youth Conference in Scotland
The 14th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students - Finals Day
Japan Foundation and British Association for Teachers of Japanese Seminar
Author Talk: Kyoko Nakajima
Sake Symposium: Understanding the Unique Aspects of Sake
Japan Now 2019
Dartford Grammar School and Japan Foundation GCSE and IB Meeting
Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2019
Van Gogh & Japan: The Provence Years
Born in Okinawa
Artist Talk: Mari Katayama
Composing for Ninagawa: A Talk by Yasuhiro Kasamatsu
Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) December 2018
Poetry as Dance: Kyomai Inou-ryu Meeting in Britain
Tanaka Kinuyo: Nation, Stardom and Female Subjectivity
Art that Speaks: Meiro Koizumi
Experience Japan Exhibition 2018
Japan Foundation at the Language Show London 2018
The Expression of Youth: Japanese Street Fashion in Post-War Culture
Artist Talk: Aida Makoto
Japanese Study Seminar in Alsace 2018: Call for Participation!
Japan Conference for Schools 2018
Author's Talk: Satoshi Kitamura
Author's Talk: Sayaka Murata
Author's Talk: Genki Kawamura
Film Screening: Your Name
Japan Foundation at Japan Matsuri 2018
Ryoji Ikeda at the Atlantic Project
Stop Motion Animation Which Never Stops - Animation Creators' Talk
Fumihiko Maki - Bodies of Thought
JAEFF 2018: Youthquake
Countdown to Kickoff: Japan's rugby history one year out from the 2019 Rugby World Cup
Artist Talk: Taro Izumi
Winds of Change - Japanese Contemporary Plays and Playwright Series
BAJS 2018 Conference: Crisis? What Crisis? Continuity, and Change in Japan.
Kazuo Hara at Open City Documentary Festival 2018
The 14th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students
Full of Noises presents: Tomoko Sauvage and ASUNA
Summer Explorers! 2018
Pre-Summer Explorers Japanese Language Tasters!
Maeda Kamari calligraphy Performance and Workshop
Pre-Summer Explorers!
Coming soon! Pre + Summer Explorers!
UCL-Japan Youth Challenge 2018
The Influence of Japanese Architecture – Royal Academy Architecture Awards Week
Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) July 2018
Noh Reimagined 2018: Sublime Illusions
Talk: Kengo Kuma on architecture and Identity
Japanese Artists at Supersonic Festival
UKABS 2018 Annual Conference
Artist Talk: Noritake Kinashi
MODE curated by Ryuichi Sakamoto
Nihongo Cup 2018 - Finals Day
Tatsuo Miyajima at the William Morris Gallery
Inclusive Bodies - Creation in dance with different physicality
Sex, Nudes, and the EverydayArtist talk by Ryudai Takano
Sex, Nudes, and the Everyday - Artist talk by Ryudai Takano
JF/BAJS/BATJ Spring Symposium: (Re)Defining and Promoting Japanese Studies in the UK
Sex, Nudes, and the Everyday
Artist talk by Ryudai Takano
Spring Explorers
Spring Explorers!!
Spring Explorers!!!
Spring Explorers!!!!
Spring Explorers!!!!!!
Spring Explorers! - Free Film Programme
JFTFP18: Sixteen films; Eighteen venues; 131 screenings – done!
A Talk by Yu Irie- Memoirs of a Murderer Director
Rie Nakajima - Cyclic
Murakami on Screen (Eyes on Murakami)
Haruki Murakami and I- A Talk by Hideo Furukawa
13th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students FINALS DAY
Japan Now 2018
Japan Foundation / BAJS Japanese Studies Postgraduate Workshop 2018: Bridging the Academic Worlds of the UK and Japan
Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui/Bunkamura Theatre Cocoon’s ‘Pluto'
(Un)true Colours: Secrets and Lies in Japanese Cinema- Experience Japan through Cinema
Primary Japanese Resource Sharing Workshop 2018
Game Play:- A Talk by Hirokazu Yasuhara (Sonic the Hedgehog Game-Designer)
Conference: At the Roots of Visual Japan. Word-text dynamics in early-modern Japan
Nihongo Cup 2018 - Applications Open!
Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) December 2017
Archipelago: Exploring the Landscape of Contemporary Japanese Women Filmmakers
HYPER JAPAN presents: Illuminight – Magical ‘akari’ lanterns installation
Contemporary Japan Speaker Series by the London Asia Pacific Centre
Japan Foundation at Experience Japan Exhibition 2017
Conference: Foreign Graduate Employment in Japanese Companies – Implications for Japanese Studies Teaching & Research
Japan’s Changing Diplomatic and Security Practice – A Research Workshop
Ecologies of Knowledge and Practice - Japanese Studies and the Environmental Humanities
Is Japanese Food Healthy? Taste, Sense and Sensation - A Talk by Prof Ole G Mouritsen
Tears and Laughter: Women in Japanese Melodrama
Filmmaker Naoko Ogigami in conversation
Japan Foundation at Language Show London 2017
The World’s a Stage: Yukio Ninagawa’s Work, Career and His Legacy
Ninagawa Company's Macbeth
BFI London Film Festival 2017
Poetry in Stop Motion - New Expressions in Japanese Animation: A Talk by Prof Yuichi Ito
Transnational Cities: Tokyo and London
Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival 2017
Ryoji Ikeda - Test Pattern Live
Japanese Study Seminar in Alsace 2017: Call for Participation!
The Children's Bookshow
Japan Foundation at Japan Matsuri 2017
Raindance Film Festival 2017
WHAT ARE WE TRYING TO CONNECT? Japanese Identity and Desire to Pass on the Language and Culture among Japanese Diaspora
Japanese Taster for Schools Programme Volunteer Training Day 2017
BAJS Workshop: Meiji Japan in Global History
Leaving Language in a Japanese Limousine
International Workshop on Reflective Transitions of Politics in Japanese Art
Culinary Culture & Gastronomy in Japanese Cinema
The 13th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students
UCL-Japan Youth Challenge 2017
Summer Explorers 3: A special free film programme all about food
Japanese Cultural Studies outside of Japan – its current status and future perspectives
The Life and Work of Jiro Takamatsu - Talk by Yumiko Chiba
Jiro Takamatsu: The Temperature of Sculpture
Mr Potsunen's Peculiar Slice of Life by Kentaro Kobayashi
The Japanese House: I Was Born, But... + live piano and Benshi narration
NIHONGO CUP | The Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary Schools in the UK FINALS DAY
Japan Orientation at the University of East Anglia
How to become a Benshi! Silent Cinema and the Art of Live Narration
Kikagaku Moyo UK Tour
London, Rio, Tokyo Olympics Symposium
British Museum presents: Hokusai
The Old Puppet Joruri: The Tale of High Priest Kochi
"The World of Maki Asakawa" - Songs from the Japanese Post-War Counterculture
Architecture on Stage: Atelier Bow Wow
Sport and Diplomacy: Past Reflections and Looking Towards 2020
Vegalta: Soccer, Tsunami and the Hope of a Nation -
Documentary screening and discussion
The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945
Filmmaker Talk: Naotaro Endo, director of Tsukiji Wonderland
Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) July 2017
12th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students FINALS DAY
A Silent Voice - Discover Japanese Studies through Anime!
Japan Now at the British Library
Japan Foundation / BAJS Japanese Studies Postgraduate Workshop 2017: Make an Impact
The Many Faces of Noh - Talk and Demonstration by Hideta Kitazawa
Giving Choice And Connecting People: Expanding Ideas For Japanese Language Study With Minato
The Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2017
Language Education for Social Future: Language, Community, and Identity
Children's Lives in Wartime Japan
An Ode to Toru Takemitsu
Anisong - The Musical World of Anime
Marugoto Japanese Language & Culture Course (Starter A1 Level) | TERM 2
Marugoto Japanese Language & Culture Course (A1 Beginner Stage 2 Level) | TERM 2
Japanese IB Networking Event
NIHONGO CUP | The Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary Schools in the UK
Winds of Change: Staged Readings 2016
Part 4: The Sun by Tomohiro Maekawa
Primary Japanese Resource Sharing workshop
Voices from the Japanese Avant-garde Music Scene:
Talk and Performance by Musician and Vocalist Koichi Makigami
London International Animation Festival 2016
Let's Play Hanafuda!
Japanese Taster for Schools Programme Volunteer Training Day 2016
Game Changer - talk by Hisakazu Hirabayashi
Japanese Culture Day
Contact Points Talk and Lecture
Japan Foundation at Experience Japan Exhibition 2016
Shinsuke Ogawa and Ogawa Pro: Collective filmmaking and the culture of dissidence
Silence is Golden? Classroom Silence in Universities in Japan and the UK
Winds of Change: Staged Readings 2016
Part 3: Pighead
Illustrated Talk by Obi Impresario Genbei Yamaguchi X
Using Drama to Enrich Japanese Language Education
The Red Candle - Mermaids in the East
Dartford Grammar School - Japanese Networking Event for Head Teachers
Speaking Out: Actor-Director Talk Kaori Momoi
Talk by author Mitsuyo Kakuta
Manga: The New Generation - Talk by Ken Niimura and Miki Yamamoto
Japan Foundation at Language Show Live London 2016
Lakes International Comic Arts Festival 2016
TUSK Festival 2016
Winds of Change: Staged Readings 2016
Part 2: Got to Make Them Sing!
Here and Now
Japanese Study Seminar in Alsace 2016: Call for Participation!
Japan Foundation at Japan Matsuri 2016
Talk by author Miri Yu
Ninagawa x Shakespeare - Talk by Yuriko Akishima
London Design Biennale
London Design Biennale 2016
JF Supported: Joint East Asian Studies Conference 2016
Winds of Change: Staged Readings 2016
The Twelfth Japanese Speech Contest for University Students
Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) December 2016
Shining Stars: Idols in Japanese Cinema in the 1980s and 1990s
Summer Explorers! 2 - Japanese Anime Screenings
Japan Foundation at Hyper Japan Festival
Koki Tanaka: Liverpool Biennial 2016
Miss Revolutionary Idol Berserker: Talk by Toco Nikaido
Japanese Experience for Children in Brighton
MFL Progress TeachMeet at Howes Primary in Coventry
Nihongo Cup Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary Schools 2016 Finals Day
Edinburgh International Film Festival 2016
Self-made Photobooks as an Object - Talk by Yumi Goto
Kamishibai performance of “Wakamiya-maru” story via skype
5th East London Comics & Arts Festival
Photobook Bristol
Artist talk by Katsumi Komagata
Japanese Plus | Learn About Wakamiya-Maru: The Edo Ship that Sailed the World
Into the River: Artist talk by O JUN
Japan Foundation/BATJ Early Summer Conference: Teaching Japanese with Technology Within and Beyond the Classroom
LIFT ‘16: Miss Revolutionary Idol Berserker
Artist talk by Sputniko!
Japanese for Juniors: All About Japanese Dolls!
Japanese Gardens: Talk by Kei Ishikawa
Artist Talk by Shun Ito
Talk & Demonstration: Exploring the Music of Noh
Koki Tanaka: Provisional Studies: Action #5 Conceiving the Past, Perceiving the Present
Japanese Show & Tell! Online Resource Workshop for Independent Learners of Japanese
Common Thread: Artist talk by Satoru Aoyama
Marugoto Japanese Language & Culture Course (Starter A1 Level) - Term 3
Spring Double Bill: "Kabuku" and "The Garden of Words"
Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) July 2016
Filmmaker Talk: Aya Hanabusa
Japan Foundation at Language Show Live Scotland
PARO - The Therapeutic Robot: Robotics for an Ageing Society
Bite-sized Bunraku: A Little Flavour of Japanese Traditional Puppetry
Japan Conference for schools 2016
Primary Japanese Up-skilling Course – Level 1: 5 March 2016
Design for living with kids - talk by Shu Hagiwara
Japanese Noir - Author Fuminori Nakamura in conversation
The 11th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students FINALS DAY
JAPAN NOW
International Dialogues - Shigeru Ban
Public Seminar: Female Entrepreneurship in Japan
Deadline Extended! Ask me anything in Japanese with director Yuki Tanada
Japan Foundation at London Anime & Gaming Con Feb 2016
The Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2016
Japan Foundation / BAJS Japanese Studies Post-graduate Workshop 2016
Temple Tastes - Talk by Rev. Kakuho Aoe
Creation from Catastrophe – how Architecture rebuilds Communities
Cream Screens: Takashi Makino and [+] Collective
Throwing Shadows: Japanese Expanded Cinema in the Time of Pop
J-Basic - Last Chance EVER to enrol!
Marugoto Japanese Language & Culture Course (Starter A1 Level) - Term 2
What Girls Want - The World of Shojo Manga (Girls' Comics)
Nihongo Cup – The Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary School Students in the UK
Art in the Age of the Global Environment
The Crucified Lovers (Chikamatsu monogatari)
Can a Freeter Buy a House? Contemporary Housing Issues in Japan from the 'Lost Generation' to 'Generation Rent'
Film screening and discussion: Samurai Warrior Queens
Japanese Taster for Schools (JTS) Programme 2015 Training Day for Volunteers
Japanese Language Teachers’ Seminar: How to use Japanese language learning websites and apps: Expanding your ideas and options
Fogscape #03238 by Fujiko Nakaya (Lumiere Festival)
Japanese Plus: Let’s Speak Kansai Dialect!
Safe as Houses? Housing and Welfare in an Ageing Society: Japan and UK Perspectives
NEoN Digital Arts
Kawaii as a Button! Cuteness in Contemporary Craft Practice
Kawaii: Crafting the Japanese Culture of Cute
D.I.Y. Japanese Club! Extra-Curricular Japanese Resources & Ideas Sharing Workshop
Double Bill: Films by Makoto Shinkai (Gateshead)
Double Bill: Films by Makoto Shinkai (Gateshead, Anime Attacks)
Japan Group Tour Programme for UK Head Teachers 2015
Hatsune Miku - The Metamorphosis of Music and Technology
Artist talk by Oyama Enrico Isamu Letter
Shojo manga: Girls' Comics from Japan
Shojo manga: Girls' Comics from Japan
Japan Foundation at Language Show Live 2015
TUSK Festival 2015
Marugoto Japanese Language & Culture Course (Starter A1 Level)
Artist Talk by Hideyuki Katsumata
Japan Foundation at Bristol Anime Con
Hideyuki Katsumata: USO de HONTOU
Riding the Current - Japanese Contemporary Art and its Curatorial Views
Shinya Tsukamoto: Filmmaker Talk
Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival
Join the Club! Fandom in Japanese Theatre: Kabuki & Takarazuka
Sensoria 2015
Raindance Film Festival
Japanese Study Seminar in Alsace 2015: Call for Participation!
Japan Foundation at Japan Matsuri 2015
BUKATSUDŌ: Teaching Character in Japanese School Clubs
The Eleventh Japanese Speech Contest for University Students
The Lie of the Land - Rethinking Landscape Painting
Japanese from Scratch: All About Bento!
Primary Japanese - resources sharing workshop
Current Location (Fellswoop Theatre)
Japanese Language Proficiency Test December 2015
Voices from the Past: Shadows of War in Japanese Cinema
Summer Explorers! Japanese Anime Screenings
Japanese Refresher Course for Teachers 2015
Central and Local Governance in Japan and the UK: Lessons from Okinawa and Scotland
Takehisa Kosugi: SPACINGS
Inside the Industry: ANIME
Japan Foundation at Hyper Japan Festival July 2015
SAKE: Tradition Meets Innovation - The Story of the First Non-Japanese Sake Master Brewer
Japanese Language Proficiency Test July 2015
Japan Foundation at London Anime & Gaming Con July 2015
Public Seminar: STEMming the Gender Gap: A New Era for Japanese Women in Science and Engineering?
Japan Foundation Japanese Studies Student Survey 2015
ENDO Shuhei | Architect for a New Era
**2nd chance!** Japanese from Scratch: Sweet-Talk your way in Japan!
Nihongo Cup: The Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary Schools in the UK FINALS DAY!
Edinburgh International Film Festival
Artist talk by SHIMURAbros
Public Seminar: INEMURI: The Art of Napping in Japan
Post 3.11: What Can Art Do? Four Years On: Art and the Disaster
Learn & Teach Primary Japanese!
J-CLan Initiative: Introduction to Japanese Culture and Language Teaching in Primary Education
Screen Translation and the Benshi Tradition in Japan
Carving the Future - Contemporary Japanese Sculpture Today
Talk with Noe Aoki and Teppei Kaneuji
A Lost Art Revived: Tsujigahana, Itchiku Tsujigahana and Itchiku Kubota -- A talk by Dr Jacqueline M. Atkins
Worn with Pride -- Textiles, Kimono, and Propaganda in Japan, 1925-1945
Japanese from Scratch: Sweet-Talk your way in Japan!
Public Seminar: People Make Places: Empowering Locals through Community Design
Film Screening: KABUKU
Behind the Curtain of Contemporary Kabuki Theatre
Reality Check: Artist talk by Chim↑Pom
The Japan Foundation & SOAS Language and Culture Course (Beginner Level) - Term 3
Japan Foundation Japanese Language & Culture Course A2 Elementary Stage (Pilot)
Workshop: Rethinking 'Japanese' Pop Culture: A Topic for Academic Study?
Rethinking 'Japanese' Pop Culture: Transnational media cultural connections and the question of cultural diversity
Eastern Exchanges: East Asian Craft and Design
Japanese Plus: Talk About Music in Japanese
Volunteer Japanese Teaching Opportunity at University of Edinburgh Training Day
The Japan Webpage Contest for Schools 2014-15 - Award Ceremony and Presentation Evening
Japanese for Juniors: Learn Japanese through Stamp-Making!
Windows on a Modern World: The Role of the Department Store in 20th Century Japan
Nihongo Cup Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary School Students 2015
Japanese Studies Post-Graduate Workshop, 2015
Japan Conference for Schools 2015
The Tenth Japanese Speech Contest for University Students FINALS DAY
The Metamorphosis of Japan After the War
Postwar Japanese Photography - Talk by Marc Feustel
Dartford Grammar School - GCSE and IB event
Make Your Own Japanese Teaching Resources with PowerPoint
Glasgow Film Festival
Artist's Talk: Fujiko Nakaya
Fog Bridge by Fujiko Nakaya
Artist talk by Chu Enoki: "Scrap Heap Hero"
JF@London Anime & Gaming Con
The Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme
It Only Happens in the Movies? Japanese Cinema and Encounters
Contemporary Art History: Japan - A Book Talk by Hideki Nakazawa
Japanese Language Teachers’ Seminar: I Can Write in Japanese
Metamorphosis of Japan After the War
Plexus
Potential of Japanese language education in primary schools
Potential of Japanese Language Education in Primary Schools - Public Seminar
Artist Talk by Riusuke Fukahori
Bigakko: Anti-Academy - Talk by Alice Maude-Roxby
JF-BATJ Japanese Language Teachers' Seminar: Assessing Japanese with JF Standard - with Mayumi Mitsuya
Special Film Screening: Ninja Shadow Warriors
Artist Talk by Aiko Miyanaga
The Truth About...Ninjas - Talk and Demonstration
Artist talk by Satoshi Kitamura
in conversation with Nicolette Jones
Public Seminar: The Role of Education in Disaster Risk Reduction: Lessons from Kobe and Tohoku
Public Seminar: The Happy Youth of a Desperate Country
Public Seminar: Online Election Campaigns and Digital Democracy in Japan
Rie Nakajima: Fall
Public Seminar: The Real Story Behind Japan's Marriage Crisis
Aesthetica Short Film Festival
Japanese Plus Special: Friend or Foe? Understanding Japanese Thought and Culture through Yōkai
Public Seminar: 50 Years of the Shinkansen
Introduction to "flipped learning" for GCSE Japanese
Shinjuku Culture in the 1960s -
Talk by Go Hirasawa and Jelena Stojković
Japan Group Tour Programme for UK Headteachers
Teacher Training: WJEC Japanese Language Units (QCF)
Talk: Building Blocks: Curating Architecture
Public Seminar - Maths-As-It-Could-Be: The life and philosophy of Kiyoshi Oka
Japan Foundation at Language Show Live 2014
The Modern Lens: International Photography and the Tate collection
Public Seminar: Prof AKIRA IRIYE - An Historian Looks at the Contemporary World
Shinro Ohtake
Workshop: Let's Catch the Lion -
Dobutsu Shogi (Animal Shogi) instructed by Madoka Kitao
Artist talk: Shinro Ohtake
Public Seminar: WORLD LITERATURE, Japanese perspectives
Talk: Speaking the Same Language - International Collaboration and Co-production in Performing Arts
Book Launch: The Growing Power of Japan, 1967-1972
Artist talk: Yoshitomo Nara
Yoshitomo Nara: Greetings from a Place in My Heart
Japanese Language Proficiency Test December 2014
Japan Foundation at Japan Matsuri 2014
Talk - Gekiga: The Evolution of Alternative Manga
Talk: An Introduction to Sake
Public Seminar: Japanese Archaeology in the Digital Age
Art Meets Design -
Talk: Yuri Suzuki x Kouichi Okamoto with Alex Coles
Japanese Studies Seminar in Alsace: Call for Participation!
Japan Foundation/JGap Japanese Language Teachers' Seminar: Self-Expressing Activities and Elementary Japanese Language Education
LDF Digital Design Weekend: Magnetic Field Record, Kouichi Okamoto
It’s a Wrap: Japanese furoshiki past and present
Public Seminar: Economic Policy and the Welfare State in Japan and the UK
Japanese Taster for Schools (JTS) Programme – September 2014 Training Day for Volunteers
Public Seminar - Always on and connected: young people and their mobile social media use in Japan, the US, and the UK
Japan Foundation at Alcon
Out of Step - Artist talk by contact Gonzo
Public Seminar - NAGADORO: Rural Life after the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster
Double Bill: Films by Makoto Shinkai
Young, Fearless & Limitless -
Artist talk - Yo Nakamura and Underground Airport
Public Seminar: Tracing Colours and Characters in the Work of HARUKI MURAKAMI
Public Seminar: The Work of the Visual in Mourning the Dead in Post-Tsunami Japan
Public Seminar - Freeter, the Japanese Precariat: Youth and Labour Disintegration in Japan
Japanese Film Screenings at the Japan Foundation
Introduction to new resources for the JF Japanese Scheme of Work for Key Stage 2
Japan Foundation at Hyper Japan 2014
Stamp Rally @ JF Library - Summer 2014
Artist talk: Macoto Murayama on Botech Compositions - Where Botanical Art Meets Science
Japanese Plus: Japanese for Jobs
Botech Compositions: New Work by Macoto Murayama
Special Free Film Screening: The Lovers' Exile
Artist talk: Seiichi Hayashi in conversation with Ryan Holmberg
Seminar: Takarazuka - A Hundred Years of Song and Dance
Japanese Taster for Schools (JTS) Programme – June 2014 Training Day for Volunteers
Journal
Seminar: One Place After Another - What can periodical international contemporary art projects actually share?
Playwright Talk: Toshiki Okada
Book Launch & Talk: Making Tea, Making Japan. Kristin Surak in conversation with Christine Guth and Fabio Gygi
LIFT 2014: Toshiki Okada’s Super Premium Soft Double Vanilla Rich
J-Basic Online for Teachers 2015

Seminar: Takarazuka - A Hundred Years of Song and Dance   org

The Takarazuka Revue Company, one of the largest theatre groups in Japan, features an all-female cast that specialises in either a “male role” or a “female role” in the musicals, stage dramas and dance revues. Showcasing a wide range of genres, it has attracted a mass audience of mostly female followers, resulting in tickets sales reaching fever pitch levels. But what is the role of Takarazuka in the world of Japanese theatre and what does it signify?

This special event commemorating the 100th anniversary of Takarazuka provides an opportunity to cultivate a cross-cultural understanding of the theatre company through discussion. Beginning with a brief talk by Dr Nobuko Anan, a lecturer in Japanese studies at Birkbeck, University of London, regarding the history and characteristics of Takarazuka, she will be joined by Noriko Tosaka (aka Ai Otohara) and Machiko Nakano (aka Reo Kazami), two distinguished former Takarazuka performers, as well as Jano Williams, co-director of the documentary Dream Girls (1994). Tosaka and Nakano will reflect on their past experiences inside the exclusive, fiercely competitive company whose practices have remained largely unchanged for a century. As arguably one the first filmmakers outside of Japan to capture the elite world of Takarazuka, Williams, a British filmmaker, will speak about their motives for making their insightful film, and what they observed through the camera behind the scenes of the dazzling revue.

Following the discussion, the former Takarazuka performers will take part in a short demonstration illustrating the distinct form of male and female characterisations that the company is so well known for.

This event will extend beyond a simple overview of Takarazuka and together, the speakers, each with their own perspectives, will delve into the impact of Takarazuka, issues associated with Takarazuka, including gender, as well as the societal norms that have created this spectacular scene.


Date: 27 June 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

Back to Top

セカンダリー日本語教師のためのワークショップ - Online Workshop for Secondary School Teachers: How do we equip our students with 21st century skills   org

Calling all secondary school teachers of Japanese! We will be holding an online workshop led by two of the authors of a popular textbook series for secondary pupils.

This workshop introduces the pedagogical benefits of using 'iiTomo' series (2nd edition) (https://www.pearson.com.au/educator/secondary/browse-resources-online/resources-for-languages/japanese/iitomo/) which aims to equip students with 21st century skills in a variety of ways. Participants will experience intercultural language learning through the eyes of students and teachers. The workshop includes group work to share ideas of assessment tasks and new online tools for formative assessment.

- Date: 26th June 2021 (Saturday), 9:00-11:00 (BST)

- Location: Online seminar using Zoom software

- To apply, please click here: https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/3PPPWL/

- Participation fee: Free (Registration in advance is required.)

- Registration deadline: 10th June

- Languages used: Japanese/English

- Speaker: Ms Yoko Nishimura-Parke and Ms Yoshie Burrows

- Target audience: Secondary school teachers of Japanese (Private tutors are also welcome).

- Maximum number of participants: 50

In case that we receive more applications than we have spaces, we will prioritise applicants who are currently teaching GCSE Japanese in the United Kingdom and we might close the applications earlier than the deadline if capacity is reached.

- Planned schedule: Following the workshop, there will be an optional social gathering from 10:30.

Speakers’ Profiles:

Ms Yoko Nishimura-Parke

As a senior education officer at the NSW Department of Education, Australia, Yoko Nishimura-Parke developed numerous language learning resources for language education during the period 1998-2015. Yoko also co-authored the Japanese language textbook series Mirai (1995‐2006) and iiTomo (2008‐2019), published by Pearson Education Australia. Yoko is actively involved in creating language learning resources to foster ethical and intercultural understanding and cultivate global views focusing on sustainability.   

Ms Yoshie Burrows

Yoshie Burrows, lead author of the iiTomo series, has been actively involved in Japanese education in Victoria for more than twenty-five years. This includes a long career at Loreto College as a Year 7-12 teacher and language department coordinator. Since 2015, she has been the Languages Professional Learning Community Leader for the Catholic Education Office at Ballarat Diocese. She has written VCE teaching materials including the Leading Edge VCE Japanese textbook, as well as practice exams for the Melbourne Centre for Japanese Language Education.


Date: 26 June 2021 from 9.00am - 11.00am

Online event.

Back to Top

[Online Talk] Women's Voices and Women's Verses   org

 

In the very long history of Japanese literature, poetry is arguably one of the first recognized literary forms. The notable Manyosho, a collection of Japanese short poems produced in the 8th century, evokes the gaze and thoughts of people from all walks of life and, until this day, still sets a standard for Japanese poetry. Contrary to the common perception that the world of literature is dominated by male voices, Japanese society did not always exclude women’s perspectives when it came to the arts and, indeed, there was a time where constructing and reading poetry was a significant tool of communication regardless of the gender. However, has the trend evolved with the times and have women remained in a prominent position within this literary sphere?

In this first session of the ‘Finding Japanese Poetry’ series, the Japan Foundation invites poets and translators, YOTSUMOTO Yasuhiro and MORIYAMA Megumi (who has recently released her work, Nakazora), to trace the role of female poets from ancient to contemporary Japan, discussing their creativity, the gaze of women, and the impact their verses made upon Japan and its literary society. The talk will be led by Michele Hutchison, an award-winning translator.

 

About the speakers

(Moderator) Michele Hutchison is a British translator, writer and editor based in Amsterdam. Her translation of Marieke Lucas Rijneveld's The Discomfort of Evening was awarded the 2020 International Booker Prize and her translation of Sander Kollaard's Stage Four won the 2020 Vondel Translation Prize. Recent poetry translations include Man Animal Thing by Alfred Schaffer (Eyewear Publishing) and Putting On My Species by Sasja Janssen (Shearsman Books). She is also co-author of The Happiest Kids in the World and is currently working on a new non-fiction book.

MORIYAMA Megumi was born in Tokyo. She is a poet, English haiku poet, and translator. She is the author of four full-length books of poetry, including Tangible Dreams (Yume no tezawari, 2005), which was composed for a choir piece and published. MORIYAMA had been selected as a New Poet by a major poetry periodical and her poems have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. She has recently co-translated the full text of Arthur Waley’s The Tale of Genji and has won the 2020 Donald Keene Special Award. Her latest work is the translation of Virginia Woolf’s The Waves.

YOTSUMOTO Yasuhiro, poet and translator, born in 1959. So far he has published 13 books of poetry, two novels, and a couple of literary criticisms. Yasuhiro also published a few poetry translations including Stay home on Earth! , an anthology of COVID-19 related poems from around the world; The Poetic Works Homo Sapiens, an anthology of contemporary poetry from 32 poets in 22 countries; and Kid by Simon Armitage. His latest book is The Selected Poems of Shinkawa Kazue (Vagabond Press, Sidney), co-translated with Takako Lento.

 

The Japan Foundation ‘Finding Japanese Poetry Series’

 

 

This online event is free to attend but places are limited and registration is essential. To reserve your space, please book your ticket here.

 


Date: 13 July 2021 from 1.00pm

For more information, please click here.

Celebrating:

Back to Top

Nihongo Cup 2021 Finals Day   org

We are excited to announce that the Finals Day of the Nihongo Cup Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary Schools in the UK will take place online on 10th July 2021 (Saturday).

The UK's talented young students of Japanese language will be competing for some brilliant prizes. Finalists are in all levels of Secondary education - Key stage 3, Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5.

Please be aware that this event is closed to the public. Spectators will be limited to finaliasts, their families and their teachers, as well as Nihongo Cup organisers, sponsors and so on.

You can download the programme for Finals Day by clicking on the attachment to this article.


Date: 10 July 2021 from 12.30pm - 3.40pm
Venue:

Online.

Download NC2021 Programme
Back to Top

Ninja: Their Philosophies and Duties - A Talk by Professor Yuji Yamada   org

 

Telework Ninja – it’s the new term invented in response to the Covid 19 pandemic in Japan. The ‘ninja’ terminology is used here to, rather sarcastically, refer to those who have vanished from the working scene as the work from home system was introduced, but keep up the pretence of carrying out their job. This negative use of the term ‘ninja’ would likely not have been appreciated by those whose profession traditionally focused on the principle of keeping out of sight.

So, what were the true ninja’s secretive endeavours, roles and duties? What philosophy and mindset did they embrace in working as a ninja?

Based on his new research, leading expert in the field of ninja, Prof Yuji Yamada from Mie University in Japan, will explain the historical work done by real ninja while examining if any of their spirit and skills can be transferred to us in the modern age.

About Prof. Yuji Yamada

Prof. Yuji Yamada is a specialist in medieval Japanese cultural history and serves on the Faculty of Humanities, Law and Economics at Mie University, Japan. He earned his Ph.D. in history from Tsukuba University. His research focuses on the history of ‘vengeful spirits’, strange phenomena, Ise shrine, and ninja studies. His most recent publications include The Spirit of Ninja (2019).


Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom. 


Date: 16 June 2020 from 12.00am

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

Kobanashi Workshop for Educators – Sharing Teaching Practices and Learning   org

Since last year, the Japan Foundation has been continuing work concerning Japanese language education that utilizes Kobanashi. 

In this workshop, participants can view concrete examples of how Kobanashi is used in teaching, drawing on the actual practice of educators in a variety of locations.

They can explore the discovery of practice as well as any issues encountered, and also make plans for new methods of practice. In this way we hope to create an enjoyable workshop with collaborative learning.

We welcome both participants who already use Kobanashi in practice, as well as Japanese language educators who wish to use Kobanashi in their lessons in the future.

  • Workshop Format: Online (Zoom software
  • Dates:  16th July 2021 (Fri)
  • Time: 10:00 - 12:30 (BST
  • Number of Participants: Approx. 20
  • Instructor: Dr. Kazumi Hatasa (Purdue University, United States of America; Chair, Dept. of East Asian Language and Cultures, SLC, Asian Studies Faculty).
  • Guidelines for Prospective Participants: PDF Sign-Up Guidelines (This can be downloaded as the attachment file below).

The application form link is included in the Sign-Up Guidelines PDF. We would like to ask prospective participants to read the guidelines carefully and then fill out the application form.

  • Sign-up Deadline: 28th June (Monday), 17:00 (BST)

 


Date: 16 July 2021 from 10.00am - 12.00pm
Download 7.16 JFLO小噺ワークショップ参加者募集要項_final
Back to Top

[Online Talk] Rendering Culture & Conveying Nuance: How Translators Read Japanese Poetry   org

 

Translating literature into a different language requires not only high linguistic skills but also a fair understanding of the culture and society depicted in the original version. Distilling authors’ intended messages and meaning, translators navigate subtle nuance, aided by reading between the lines if necessary. However, is the medium of poetry comparable? Condensing wording, meaning, and nuance to fit the desired meter and style, writing poetry is, technically, very different from writing novels. Therefore, should those who accept the challenge of translating poetry be equipped with special skills disparate from those that are required for translating novels?

 

For the second day of the miniseries ‘Finding Japanese Poetry’, the Japan Foundation has invited three experienced poetry translators, YOTSUMOTO Yasuhiro, LENTO Takako, and Dr Janine Beichman, to introduce and explore their individual approaches to Japanese poetry and consider issues in reading and translating this sophisticated but demanding literary form, in an informal roundtable discussion. This will be led by Dr Alan Cummings, Senior Lecturer at the School of Oriental and African Studies, who is also a translator of the shortest type of Japanese poem, the haiku.

 

 

About the panellists

 

(Moderator)

Dr Alan Cumming is a translator and senior lecturer in Japanese Studies in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, SOAS, University of London. His academic research is in early modern Japanese literature and theatre, especially kabuki. Amongst his publications are a volume of translations of haiku and senryu, Haiku: Love (British Museum Press, 2013), and several translations in the Kabuki Plays on Stage series (University of Hawai'i Press).

 

 

Dr Janine Beichman, professor emerita of Daito Bunka University in Japan, has published biographies and translations of the poets Masaoka Shiki and Yosano Akiko, and translated Ōoka Makoto's anthology of classical and modern poems by Japanese poets. Her most recent publication is the translation of Ozawa Minoru’s Well-Versed: Exploring Modern Japanese Haiku. She has received grants from the NEH, the NEA, and America PEN for her research and translations of Yosano Akiko. Beneath the Sleepless Tossing of the Planets, her translations of Ōoka Makoto’s poetry, received the 2019-2020 Japan-United States Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature.

 

LENTO Takako was born and educated in Japan. LENTO is an award-winning translator of poetry from Japanese to English and vice versa. Her books include translations of Yosa Buson, Tamura Ryuichi, Tanikawa Shuntaro, Yoshimasu Gozo, Kaneko Mitsuharu, Nagase Kiyoko, and Shinkawa Kazue. She frequently contributes essays and translations to publications in the U.S. and Japan. Ms. Lento holds an MA in literature from Kyushu University and an MFA in poetry and translation from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She lives in the U.S.

 

YOTSUMOTO Yasuhiro was born in 1959. So far he has published 13 books of poetry, two novels, and a couple of literary criticisms. Yasuhiro also published a few poetry translations including Stay home on Earth! , an anthology of COVID-19 related poems from around the world; The Poetic Works Homo Sapiens, an anthology of contemporary poetry from 32 poets in 22 countries; and Kid by Simon Armitage. His latest book is The Selected Poems of Shinkawa Kazue (Vagabond Press, Sidney), co-translated with Takako Lento.

 

The Japan Foundation ‘Finding Japanese Poetry Series’

 

 

This online event is free to attend but registration is essential.

To reserve your space, please book your ticket here.

 

Image credit: Photo used in top image by Elisa Calvet B. on Unsplash

Date: 14 July 2021 from 1.00pm

For more information, please click here.

Celebrating:

Back to Top

Up-Close and Personal: Curators' Treasures   org

 

After nearly 3 months of enduring lockdown, museums and galleries in some parts of the UK are finally being given the go ahead to reopen and welcome visitors. Treasures will once again see the light of the day, inviting the curiosity of their viewers. Despite the great efforts of their curators, it is a common fact that each displayed object comprises only a part of a museum’s entire collection. For Japanese collections, this sometimes means that many fascinating objects may not have their chance to be shown often, however curators look for ways to make them accessible to audiences through store visits, talks, publications and online presentations.

In light of this, and reflecting on current circumstances, the Japan Foundation has invited a number of curators from various museums and art galleries in England to introduce their “favourite Japanese objects” which you may have never come across before, in this on-line seminar. These curators are Janet Boston, Rosie Gnatiuk, Clare Pollard, Kate Newnham, and Rachel Barclay. From antiquity to modern design, they will explain the reasons for their love as well as reveal the story of the objects which you may never have known otherwise.

Further, together with Yoshi Miki, who has done extensive research on Japanese collections in the UK, as moderator, they will discuss the ways in which objects of Japanese culture in museums and galleries, including their favourites, should be made the most of in the scope of the coming “new normal”.

Join us to hear these curators’ passion and to consider together the ways in which we should cherish our treasures.

 

Moderator

Yoshi Miki, Curatorial Consultant, and Visiting Professor, National Museum of Japanese History, Sakura, oversees the UK project “Research and Use of overseas Japanese artefacts and documents", funded by the National Institute for the Humanities since 2011. He co-curated a special exhibition "KIZUNA Japan Wales Design" at the National Museum Wales in 2018. He worked for Museums in the US and Canada for many years before he became Head of Curatorial at Kyushu National Museum in 2002-2006. He lives in San Francisco.

 

Presenters

Dr Clare Pollard is Curator of Japanese Art at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford University ’s museum of art and archaeology and Britain’s first public museum. The Ashmolean is home to an extensive collection of Japanese art, including ceramics, lacquer, paintings, prints, sword furniture and decorative arts of the Meiji era (1868-1912). Clare’s research has focused mainly on Meiji art, while in recent years she has developed a series of exhibitions and catalogues of the Ashmolean’s Japanese print collections.

Kate Newnham is Senior Curator, Visual Arts at Bristol Museum & Art Gallery. In addition to leading the art team she has curatorial responsibility for the Asian art collection, Designated as being of national/international importance. There are over 1,200 Japanese objects in the collection with highlights being netsuke, 18th-century woodblock prints and porcelain from the Irene Finch collection. Recently Kate has worked on a successful series of Japanese print exhibitions and an associated haiku competition.

Rachel Barclay is Curator of the Oriental Museum, Durham University. Rachel has led the programme to redisplay all of the Museum’s permanent galleries as well as managing the museum’s programme of temporary exhibitions and art installations. She has overseen the expansion of the Japanese collections with the acquisition of major new collections of prints and ceramics. She is currently partnering with the National Museum of Japanese History on an exhibition and catalogue for a collection of Japanese woodblock prints.

Janet Boston is Curator of Craft and Design, and Rosie Gnatiuk is Curator of Costume at the Manchester Art Gallery. The Gallery is the original useful museum, initiated in 1823 by artists, as an educational institution to ensure that the city and all its people grow with creativity, imagination, health and productivity. The gallery’s Japanese collections include ceramics, metalwork, glass, furniture, lighting, fashion and prints. The gallery has recently acquired contemporary Japanese work in all of these subjects except prints.

 

Image credits (left to right):

Starry Night Trail, 2009 by Ayako Tani, glass ©️Manchester Art Gallery

Porcelain vase with 'peach bloom, glaze, H.6.4cm, Gift of Sir Herbert and Lady Ingram, EA1956.682 ©️Ashmolean Museum

The Battle of Komaki: Kato Kiyomasa and Honda Tadakatsu, 1899, by Chikanobu Yōshū ©︎Oriental Museum

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

 

To book your place, please visit: www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/up-close-and-personal-curators-treasures-tickets-112507589228


Date: 5 August 2020 from 6.00pm

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

[Online Talk] Wagashi - A Cultural Sweet Feast for the Eyes   org

 

Wagashi, or ‘Japanese-style confectionery’, has had a long and illustrious history. Created from plant-based ingredients such as azuki beans and rice, the elegant and delicate handmade creations are the result of artistry and have entertained not only the Japanese palate but also their eyes. Often reflecting the seasons, evoking nature, and symbolising important rites of life, wagashi, the elaborate art form with many shapes and colours, has co-existed for many years with other Japanese cultural staples, particularly literature.

In this special talk, NAKAYAMA Keiko, archivist at the famed confectioner Toraya, will introduce the charms of this artistry unique to Japan by tracing its history while looking into the unique aesthetic principles, materials, and designs. She will also elaborate on its relationship with Japanese culture and literature, such as its mention in The Tale of Genji or Sei Shonagon’s The Pillow Book.

Though sadly you will not be able to savour the taste in this talk, it will still be a treat for the eyes.

 

About the speaker

NAKAYAMA Keiko is the Expert Director of Toraya Archives. She graduated from Tokyo University of the Arts, Department of Aesthetics and Art History. The theme of her dissertation at the university was The Design of Wagashi. NAKAYAMA has published several books on wagashi including The World of Wagashi (Iwanami Shoten), Wagashi Design in the Edo Era (Poplar Publishing Co., Ltd.), and the children’s book A Book of Wagashi (Fukuinkan Shoten). She also wrote about wagashi for a school textbook for 5th grade elementary pupils which aimed to encourage school children to become more familiar with traditional Japanese arts and culture.

 

About Toraya Archives

Toraya Archives was originally established in 1973 as the ‘Confections Reference Room’ with the objective of contributing to the development, preservation and transmission of wagashi culture. In addition to collecting Toraya-specific historical documents and antique utensils, the archives house general wagashi-related materials and conduct research. Information about wagashi is shared in an annual academic journal Wagashi, on the archives’ website, and through occasional exhibitions at the gallery attached to Akasaka store. While there is no facility for browsing the archives’ historical records they do try to respond to enquiries in as much detail as possible.

https://www.toraya-group.co.jp/toraya/bunko/

 

Special Thanks to Toraya

This event is curated with Mu: Arts.

 

 

This online event is free to attend but registration is essential.

To reserve your space, please book your ticket here.

 


Date: 28 July 2021 from 1.00pm

For more information, please click here.

 

 

Back to Top

‘Private Rehearsals’ – A Virtual Reading   org

The Japan Foundation London in partnership with Fabula Collective presents the virtual reading of ‘Private Rehearsals’ 

‘Private Rehearsals’ is a contemporary, satirical take on the Alexander Dumas fils story, ‘The Lady of The Camellias’, written by TAOSHITA Tetsu and adapted by Oladipo Agboluaje. It is a play about the lies we tell ourselves, how and who we perform them for and the complicated reality of love and art in crisis.

We are inviting you to the first ever rehearsed reading online, which will take place on 3rd of September 3pm BST.

To secure your space please follow the link below.


Date: 3 September 2020 from 3.00pm

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

Conjuring A Sense of Movement - Japanese Graphic Designers And Sports Posters   org

 

Japan has been the birthplace of a significant amount of talent in the field of graphic design. From book covers to product packaging, their high-quality and imaginative designs have kept inspiring the world and, as a result, imprinted many names in design history. This innovative spirit may be particularly noticed in poster design. With fresh and ground-breaking aesthetics, the outcome quite often exceeds a mere tool of communication.

Ahead of the postponed TOKYO2020, the Japan Foundation will hold a special talk focusing on Japanese posters which were created for sports or sporting events since the time of the previous Tokyo Olympics in 1964.

With help from the DNP Foundation for Cultural Promotion which collects numerous graphic treasures, the inhouse curator, KITAZAWA Eishi, will talk about the significance in aesthetics and functionality of sports posters, introducing iconic names such as KAMEKURA Yusaku who played an important role as a post-war graphic designer in Japan, while discussing how such designs reflected the social and artistic developments at the time.

Following his talk there will be a discussion with Dr Sarah Teasley, a specialist in Japanese design and its histories.

 

About the speakers

KITAZAWA Eishi, born in Nagano prefecture in 1958, graduated from the Faculty of Literature at Keio University and joined Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd in 1980. Since 1991, he has been in charge of the ginza graphic gallery (ggg). In 2008, the activities promoting graphic design and graphic art have been taken over by the DNP Foundation for Cultural Promotion; since that time, as a member of the Foundation, Kitazawa has also been in charge of the kyoto ddd gallery. As a curator, he has planned and held more than 300 exhibitions introducing both domestic and international artists.

 

Sarah Teasley is a social historian who works at the interface of history and design research, and a specialist in histories of design in modern and contemporary Japan. Most recently, she was Reader in Design History and Theory and Head of Programme for History of Design at the Royal College of Art. She received her PhD from the Department of Interdisciplinary Cultural Studies of the University of Tokyo. She has published extensively on design and making in Japan, including 'Design and Society in Modern Japan', a special issue of the Review of Japanese Culture and Society (2017).

 

This talk is made possible thanks to the help of the DNP Foundation for Cultural Promotion.

 

Image credits (left to right):

Victory 1976, Shigeo Fukuda, 1976

World Table Tennis Championships 2015, Yuri Uenishi, 2015

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/conjuring-a-sense-of-movement-japanese-graphic-designers-sports-posters-tickets-115182257232 


Date: 2 September 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

Colouring for the Future - From a Kutani Porcelain Studio   org

 

Kutani ware is one of Japan’s traditional porcelain forms, with almost 400 years history and originating from Ishikawa in the north-western region of Hokuriku. Rather than its shape, its characteristics lie in the application of five vivid colours of Japanese pigment: green, blue, yellow, purple and red; as well as in the bold yet artistic painting style which is individual to each kiln.

Having fascinated global ceramic connoisseurs and lovers for a long time, this style of porcelain has cultivated a number of renowned creators and some of their works have been exhibited in museums worldwide. However, preserving the tradition is not a single man’s journey and many Kutani ware schools, like many other pottery practices, have been safe-guarded in a “studio” system where several skilled professionals are required to take part in the creation process.

In this online event, the Japan Foundation in collaboration with IndigoRose Project has invited KAMIIDE Keigo, a direct descendant of Kutani Choemon’s kiln founded in 1879, to talk about the history and unique features that exemplify this colourful porcelain. Using conference technology to show the audience around his studio virtually, he will also explain how the pottery system works in the modern age and will present his role as a descendant of this ceramic custom, while demonstrating his idea of driving the tradition forward as a legacy for the future, as well as the way the Kutani techniques have been utilised in his artistic practice.

KAMIIDE will be joined by Dr Clare Pollard, Curator of Japanese Art at the Ashmolean Museum (Oxford University), for a brief conversation following his presentation.

 

About the speakers

KAMIIDE Keigo is a successor of the Kutani Choemon pottery studio (founded in 1879) and has been engaged in full-scale kiln management since the establishment of a joint company, Kamide Shigei. In the studio, he and his fellow craftsmen are involved in the creation of innovative works including the ‘JAIME HAYON x KUTANI CHOEMON’ collaboration series with a Spanish designer, as well as the application of the Kutani porcelain transfer technique, known as ‘KUTANI SEAL’. As an individual artist, he creates his own works and holds solo exhibitions.

Dr Clare Pollard is Curator of Japanese Art at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford University’s museum of art and archaeology and Britain’s first public museum. The Ashmolean is home to an extensive collection of Japanese art, including ceramics, lacquer, paintings, prints, sword furniture and decorative arts of the Meiji era (1868-1912). Clare’s research has focused mainly on Meiji art, while in recent years she has developed a series of exhibitions and catalogues of the Ashmolean’s Japanese print collections.

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/colouring-for-the-future-from-a-kutani-porcelain-studio-tickets-117627670529


Date: 24 September 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

[Online Event] Competing Visions of Modernity: Architects who Changed Japan   org

 

Like many other nations, Japan has undoubtedly been influenced by and benefited from the modernist movement in architecture, in terms of the societal impact it carried and the position it held as a springboard for technological advancements. Japanese architecture holds a prominent position globally thanks to its aesthetic distinctiveness and design quality pioneered by a coterie of visionary architects. Of these figures, two stand out as particularly significant and influential: TANGE Kenzo and SHINOHARA Kazuo. While each created their own school of thought which took different directions in their ideologies, approaches, materials and views on society, both gained domestic and international notoriety as truly original voices and great contributors to modernism as a global movement.

Focusing on visionaries who shaped the course of Japanese architecture, Dr Seng Kuan – a Japan Foundation Fellow, Project Associate Professor at the University of Tokyo, and Lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Design – will talk about the achievements of these two towering figures, explaining why he believes that TANGE and SHINOHARA represented two distinct vertices in this uniquely rich and momentous chapter of international modernism. He will then analyse the scope of their influence over subsequent generations of architects, providing his own predictions for how Japan’s architectural landscape might transform going into the future. After Dr Seng Kuan's presentation, there will be a short discussion with Robert Brown, Professor of Architecture and Master of Architecture Program Leader at the University of Plymouth

 

About the guest speakers

Dr Seng Kuan teaches at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and the University of Tokyo. He has written extensively on modern architectural culture in East Asia, most notably on Tange Kenzō, the Metabolists, Shinohara Kazuo as well as on the relationship between architectural design and structural engineering. Seng’s research projects have been recognized with grants from the Graham Foundation, the Japan Foundation, and the Association for Asian Studies. He received a PhD in architecture from Harvard University and serves as chief editorial advisor to the journal a+u.

Robert Brown is Professor of Architecture and Master of Architecture Program Leader at the University of Plymouth. He has taught and lectured in Japan, including at Kobe University, as well as in Austria, Canada, China, Egypt and US. His research interests include socio-cultural identity and place, with publications on Japanese architecture and rituals. He is the author of various entries referencing Japanese architecture for The Encyclopaedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World (forthcoming). He is the recipient of funding from the Daiwa Foundation, Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation and Japan 21 Foundation, and is chair of the RIBA Research Grants Committee. 

 

Image credits:

Tange Kenzō, House in Seijō, Tokyo, 1953. Photo by Hirayama Chūji

Shinohara Kazuo, House in Kugayama, Tokyo, 1954. Photo by Hirayama Chūji 

 

The Japan Foundation Game Changer Series: The World is Changing; What Changed Japan

 

Please note that this will be an Online Event held on Zoom.

 

This online event is free to attend but places are limited and registration is essential. To reserve your space, please book your ticket here

 

 


Date: 29 June 2021 from 1.00pm

For more information, please click here.

Back to Top

Kimono Crossing the Sea - Its Power to Inspire Imagination and Creativity   org

 

‘Kimono’ is a word that has long been synonymous with the image of Japan and Japanese culture. Though it was once cast aside by modern women who viewed it as old-fashioned and impractical to wear, much appreciation is now given to the kimono, especially among the younger generation and global fashion designers who believe it is expressive and on trend. It isn’t the first time, however, that the kimono is at the center of attention; in fact an enthusiastic admiration of the wardrobe piece was demonstrated in western Europe in the latter half of the 19th century when various Japanese products such as ukiyo-e had spread overseas, and the ‘Japonisme’ whirlwind had taken over. For progressive artists such as Manet and Whistler, as well as innovative fashion designers such as Paul Poiret and Madeleine Vionnet, the kimono was not merely a beautiful garment invoking exoticism, but an inspirational source for their creativity and, as a result, we are able to perceive its significant influence in their pieces.

What was it about the kimono that mesmerized and captured the imagination of those artists?

Celebrating the UK’s first comprehensive exhibition about the kimono – Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk – at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London (running until 25 October 2020), the Japan Foundation has invited renowned fashion historian and curator, FUKAI Akiko, to talk about kimono as it was depicted in the latter half of 19th century and the intriguing relationship between the kimono and artists. Reflecting on the fact that its significance has been relatively dismissed in art and fashion history, she will explore what kimono meant to these masters and what they drew out of stylish, oriental fashion.

The talk will be preceded by a brief introduction by Anna Jackson, the Curator of Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk, and a brief conversation with FUKAI Akiko will follow her lecture.

 

About the speakers

FUKAI Akiko

Award-winning and renowned fashion historian and Director/Curator Emeritus of the Kyoto Costume Institute, FUKAI Akiko obtained an MA and honorary doctorate at Ochanomizu University and studied Art History at the Université de Paris IV (Institute des Arts et de l’ Archeologie). She has organized several major and acclaimed fashion exhibitions such as “Japonism in Fashion,” and “Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion” in Japan and overseas. She is also the author of multiple influential books including Reading Fashion from Pictures (PHP Institute, Kyoto, 2009), and Kimono and Japonism (Heibonsha, Tokyo, 2017) as well as Fashion (Taschen, Köln, 2002), of which 650 thousand copies have been sold so far.

Anna Jackson

Anna Jackson is Keeper of the Asian Department at the Victoria and Albert Museum. A specialist in Japanese textiles and dress, she has written widely on the subject and is the curator of the exhibition Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk and editor of the accompanying publication. Her other major research interest is the cultural relationship between Asia and Europe. In 2004 she was co-curator of Encounters: the Meeting of Asia and Europe 1500-1800 and in 2009 lead curator of Maharaja: the Splendour of India’s Royal Courts, which subsequently toured internationally.

 

Image credit:

Mrs George Smith (partial cropped version), Frederic William Burton. Private Collection. Image: National Gallery of Ireland

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please click here.

Last chance to see!

The Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum will close on 25 October 2020. The exhibition is financially supported by the Japan Foundation.


Date: 16 October 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

Japanese Artists at the Architecture Film Festival London   org

 

We are proud to partner with Architecture Film Festival London in welcoming Japanese artists to the programme line-up of the festival this June. Exploring film and installation performance pieces that create architecture out of light, projection, and film, Capsule #3 titled Temporal Architecture Sculpted in Time will include films and videos that showcase Japanese visual, sound and spatial artists such as Shiro Takatani and Dumb Type.

 

Temporal Architecture Sculpted in Light

 

Existing between the real and the imagined, the architecture of space and time created by film allows us to temporarily inhabit non-existent worlds. Intently constructed to be experienced through multiple senses, it deconstructs the space it inhabits and reconstructs an alternative space to be experienced. Manifested in a range of forms, either being passively observed or actively engaged with, this temporal, imaginary architecture is built out of light, projection, film and data.

This capsule will explore film and installation performance pieces that create architecture out of light, projection, and film. It will examine non-physical imaginary spaces which sit between virtual 3D systems and physical architectural spaces. By looking at temporal art pieces that are intended to be observed and experienced in the present and in person, this programme aims to investigate / explore architecture that has been created and enhanced with the medium of film.

 

Shiro Takatani, Between Nature and Technology

Giulio Boato, Canada, 2019, 52′

 

Across Europe and Japan, this film covers over three decades of Shiro Takatani’s artistic journey through his installations, theatre and dance performances. Takatani and his collaborators (including composer Ryuichi Sakamoto) explain the driving principles behind his work where nature and people are observed through modern tools. Takatani uses technology to improve our understanding of our environment: enhancing infinitely small organisms, showing large scale galaxies, creating an interaction between performers / dancers with cameras and large screens. Carefully selected performances and installations – remarkably filmed – demonstrate the evolution of his work.

 

2020

Dumb Type – Members: Takayuki Fujimoto, Ken Furudate, Satoshi Hama, Marihiko Hara, Yuko Hirai, Ryoji Ikeda, Nobuaki Oshika, So Ozaki, Ryo Shiraki, Norico Sunayama, Shiro Takatani, Yoko Takatani, Mayumi Tanaka, Hiromasa Tomari, Misako Yabuuchi, Aoi Yamada, Toru Yamanaka, Yukiko Yoshimoto, Japan, 2020, 57′

Under the direction of Shiro Takatani who was one of the founding members, this work is the first to be presented since Voyage (2002) 18 years ago.

 

 

Date: 2 June 2021 - 27 June 2021

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

Creativity and Designing JRPG (Japanese Role-Playing Games)   org

 

RPG, or the Role-Playing Game, is a widely known computer game genre. Though it did not originate in Japan, for decades the passion for RPGs has been strong among its nationals. Japanese computer game creators have developed an abundance of unique RPG content which subsequently and uniquely have evolved into JRPG (Japanese Role-Playing Game). Among these are the ever-popular Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy titles which secured their stable fanbase with the concepts of ongoing character growth and the evolution of storylines through battles. Games like these have managed to push Japan’s computer RPG industry to global success and continue attracting avid players. Interconnected with other media products such as anime and manga, JRPGs are also a source of drive in Japan’s commercial market. However, as the technology and user demands have shifted, Japanese creators may find themselves at crossroads and be compelled to revise the definition and existence of JRPGs in the 21st century where change is constant.

In this very special talk, the Japan Foundation has invited TOKITA Takashi, computer game creator and producer from Square Enix to talk about the position of Japanese RPGs. Based on his own experience of being involved in the creation of many JRPGs, including Final Fantasy IV and Chrono Trigger, he will explain the philosophies that he believes are fundamental in creating an interactive game world where users feel themselves becoming the main character as they play, while revealing the creative processes of Japanese RPGs and how the games can stand the test of time.

A brief conversation with Professor of Digital Media at Bath Spa University, James Newman, will follow TOKITA’s lecture.

 

About the speakers

TOKITA Takashi is a producer in the computer game industry. Since joining Square Enix (Square) in 1986, after working on Final Fantasy, Final Fantasy Legend etc. as a graphic designer, he developed Final Fantasy IV as a game designer. TOKITA has worked as a director on various titles including Chrono Trigger and Parasite Eve.

James Newman is Professor of Digital Media at Bath Spa University, UK. He has written widely on videogames, gaming histories, preservation and the cultures of play and has published a number of books including Videogames; Playing with Videogames; and Best Before. He is currently writing books on spectating videogames and on the early histories of game sound and music. James is a member of the research and curatorial team at the UK's National Videogame Museum and a co-founder of the Videogame Heritage Society Specialist Subject Network.

 

Special thanks to Square Enix and Kayoko Tezuka, Tuning for the Future (TFF) in Japan.

http://www.npo-tff.org

 

Image credit: ©1991, 2017 SQUARE ENIX CO., LTD. All Rights Reserved.
LOGO & IMAGE ILLUSTRATION: © 1991, 2007 YOSHITAKA AMANO

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please click here.


Date: 18 November 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.

Celebrating:

Back to Top

Japanese Documentary Filmmaker Haneda Sumiko: Authorship and Gender Discourses   org

This project proposes a rediscovery of probably the most important female documentary maker from Japan, Haneda Sumiko (1926-), who was a pioneer female documentarist and one of the most prolific in post-war Japan. Haneda was one of the few women working in the influential Iwanami Productions where she participated in the creation of many short and long non-fiction works from the early years of the company between 1950s and 1980s and as an independent filmmaker until 2012.

The project is the result of a collaboration of scholars working on Japanese Cinema from several angles -Gender Studies, Documentary Film, Film Theory and Authorship- who are joining efforts to cast light on this still under-researched female director.

Programme:

Friday 16th - Saturday 17th July
Online film screening: Hayachine no Fu (Ode to Mt. Hayachine, 1982, 156min). BIMI. Free but it is necessary to be enrolled in the event to have access to the film.

Thursday 22nd July (All times are GMT)
Online Symposium

11:00am - 11:15am  Introduction. Marcos Centeno, Irene González-López, Alejandra Armendáriz-Hernández, Ricardo Matos  
11:15am - 11:55am

Professor Koji Toba (Waseda University)
Visualising Invisible Contamination: Haneda Sumiko's TV Programs on Environmental Pollution

12:00pm - 1:00pm

Panel 1. Moderator: Maria Roemer (Birkbeck)

Matteo Boscarol (Independent Researcher)
The embrace of the mountain: ancestral practices and rural life on the cusp of obsolescence - Haneda Sumiko’s Ode to Mt. Hayachine.

Marcos Centeno (Birkbeck):
Haneda Sumiko: Adding Gender Perspective to the Iwanami Documentary School

 

1:00pm - 1:30pm  Break
1:30pm - 2:30pm

1.30 – 2.30pm (UK Time)              Panel 2. Moderator: Forum Mithani (SOAS)

Alejandra Armendáriz-Hernández (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos and SRUK/CERU fellow)
Women's Lives in Modern Japan. The Biographical Genre in Haneda Sumiko’s Independent Films.

Irene González-López (Meiji Gakuin University/Kingston University)
Akiko: Portrait of an Indomitable Force.

 

Friday 23rd - Saturday 24th July
Online film screening: Into the Picture Scroll-The Tale of Yamanaka Tokiwa (2004, 100min). BIMI. Free but it is necessary to be enrolled in the event to have access to the film.

Registration

This event is free and open to public. If you would like to attend the event please register. Please register via Zoom.

Image: Kanatasha and Haneda Sumiko


Date: 16 July 2021 - 24 July 2021
Back to Top

(in)Animate Objects - the Contemporary Puppetry of Nakamura Aya   org

NAKAMURA Aya is a London-based theatre practitioner, puppeteer and puppet maker originally from Japan. The unique style she has cultivated within the field is distinctly recognisable in the productions she has been part of, including adaptations of traditional Western fairy tales such as Hansel and Gretel (Horse+Bamboo Theatre, 2016), as well as Japanese literary classics like AKUTAGAWA Ryunosuke’s The Spider’s Thread (Rouge28 Theatre, 2020). Challenging our assumptions of what a puppet is, NAKAMURA works with a variety of mediums to produce puppets made in the paper theatre style, puppets constructed of everyday objects, and even human-sized Bunraku-style dolls.

Kicking off 2021 in the first of our online events in the new year, the Japan Foundation presents a special webinar during which NAKAMURA will talk about what sparked her interest in taking up puppetry and her creative influences, in addition to her philosophy and work as a puppeteer, puppet-maker, and workshop leader in more detail. She will also discuss her artistic collaborations, both national and international, such as with the multi award-winning company Rouge28 Theatre (which the Japan Foundation has had the pleasure of supporting in the past).

After her initial presentation, there will be a virtual showing of her short film production in the paper theatre style, The Spider’s Thread, followed by a discussion with the composer for the work, Verity Lane, uncovering the behind the scenes of the project. Among other topics, they will examine the feasibility of collaborative projects under the restrictive period of the ongoing pandemic and how performing art professionals can and do adapt to the new environment going forward. They will be joined by Vicky Ireland MBE FRSA, an Artistic Director specialising in theatre for children, who will moderate the conversation.

 

About the guest speakers

Verity Lane is a neurodivergent composer, writer, artist, director and producer that specialises in creating avant-garde multidisciplinary works steeped in Japanese culture. She lived in Japan for 10 years, graduating from Osaka College of Music with a masters in composition where her studies focused primarily on traditional Japanese instruments and aesthetics. She collaborates frequently with Japan and UK based artists and musicians and has recently set up Jo-Ha-Kyū Arts, an arts company focused on producing genre-defying works steeped in Japanese culture.

Vicky Ireland MBE FRSA trained at The Central School of Speech and Drama. She was the presenter for twelve years of BBC Children’s TV, 'Words and Pictures'. As Artistic Director of Polka Theatre, London from 1988-2002 she directed, produced and commissioned new theatre writing for children. Now with the actress Kumiko Mendl, she is Co-Artistic director of A Thousand Cranes, which creates theatre for children, inspired by stories from Japan and Europe. She is also the Chair of Action for Children’s Arts. Vicky was awarded the MBE medal in 2002 for services to children’s drama, the first of its kind.

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please click here.


Date: 28 January 2021 from 6.30pm

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

The 16th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students - Finals Day / 第16回大学生のための日本語スピーチ・コンテスト 決勝大会   org

Why not join us for the online Finals Day of the 16th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students and listen to what university students studying Japanese in the UK and Ireland have to say! The finalists will give their speeches and presentations in Japanese to an audience consisting of members of the public, fellow students, teachers, families, key figures from the UK-Japan community and a panel of judges.

This event is FREE to attend, but prior registration is required. This event will be held online using Zoom software. Once you have registered, you will be sent information on how to join the Zoom event, including the Zoom ID and password.

To register to attend, please click here / ご登録はこちら

(The deadline to register is Monday 1st March 2021) 

The Sixteenth Japanese Speech Contest for University Students is organised by the British Association for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language (BATJ) and the Japan Foundation London in joint partnership. The event provides an opportunity for students from the UK and Ireland to demonstrate their Japanese speaking skills.

Please note that the timing of the day's event are TBD.

Download our event poster! - Coming soon.


Date: 6 March 2021 from 1.00pm - 5.00pm
Venue:

Online (Zoom software).


The 16th Japanese Speech Contest is generously supported by:

The British Association of Japanese Studies, Central Japan Railway Company, Clearspring, Connect Job, Eikoku News Digest Limited, The Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation, IIJ Europe Limited, Japan Airlines, Japan Centre, JP Books, Ningyocho IMAHAN, Nikkei Europe Limited, Regions, Ricoh UK Limited, SUQQU Cosmetics, and ZOOM Japan.

Back to Top

The Third Online Get-Together For Secondary School Teachers セカンダリー日本語教師のための第3回ONLINE懇親会   org

Calling all secondary school teachers of Japanese! We will be holding a third Online Get-Together. This is a great opportunity to talk with your colleagues about your work in a relaxed, casual setting. We hope you can use this as a chance to talk about any issues you are facing in the classroom, exchange information on exams, and more.

 

As well as group discussion sessions, Dr Marina Sereda-Linley from Luton Sixth Form College will be giving a talk on the theme of “Teaching Japanese to Multi-level Class”. Dr Sereda-Linley received her Master and Doctor degrees in Japanese Applied Linguistics from Osaka University of Foreign Studies and Osaka University, Japan, respectively. Since joining Luton Sixth Form College as a Japanese language tutor in 2015 and facing the challenges of a multi-level classroom, she has been actively contributing to research into and the application of Differentiated Instruction in Japanese. 

 

Date:

  • 27th March 2021 (Saturday), 16:00-17:30

 

Schedule:

  • First half: Presentation by Dr Marina Sereda-Linley (Luton Sixth Form College)
  • Second half: Group discussion

 

To apply, please click here.

https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/ZJQ8Y1/

 

Participation fee: Free (Registration in advance is required.)

Registration Deadline: 19th March

Languages used: Japanese/English

 

 

You can read some comments from participants of the previous Online Get-Togethers below:

  • It was really good to join in with fellow Japanese colleagues from around the country (and world!) and listen and see in Japanese how these colleagues created and use these resources.
  • I spent a hugely worthwhile time getting to talk with other teachers that I do not often get a chance to meet and exchange new information.
  • I have gotten a lot of ideas and tips from the speaker’s presentation. Thanks to the presentation I think I can improve my teaching skills to encourage my pupils to learn more!

Date: 27 March 2021 from 4.00pm - 5.30pm
Back to Top

Women and Sport in Japan   org

Unfortunately, due travel restrictions surrounding Coronavirus, several speakers and commentators have become unable to attend this event. The organisers have therefore taken the difficult decision to cancel this event. We apologise for any inconvenience caused. 

This is the fourth event in our Sport Symposia Series organised together with SOAS Japan Research Centre This event will focus on the theme of Women and Sport in Japan.

Guest speakers will be a mix of academic researchers and sportswomen. Discussion will focus on the changing environment for women and sport, in terms of participation, progress and challenges. Guest speakers will share the inspirational stories of their sporting careers.

 

 

Helen Macnaughtan
Helen is Chair of the Japan Research Centre and Senior Lecturer in International Business & Management (Japan) at SOAS University of London. Her research interests focus on a range of topics relating to gender, employment and sport in Japan. She has previously published on the history of women’s volleyball in Japan with reference to the gold medal victory for the ‘Oriental Witches’ at the Tokyo 1964 Olympics. She is currently researching the history of rugby in postwar Japan with a focus on the corporate history of the game.




Guest Speakers

Sakai Mariko
Sakai Mariko is an Olympian who competed in Artistic (Synchronized) Swimming at the 2012 London Olympic Games. After retiring as an athlete, she has worked for the Japan Sport Council (JSC) where she is secretary for a project initiated by the government to develop a better environment for female high-level mother athletes. She also works at Tsukuba International Academy of Sport Studies at Tsukuba University Japan as a researcher since 2018. She worked in Cirque du Soleil from 2014 to 2017 where she was inspired by many performers, and she incorporates these skills into current coaching for young athletes. Having served as a national coach of her sport over the last year, she has been seeking to promote her sport for both male and female athletes.


Hirano Yuka
Hirano Yuka is a professional female football player, currently signed at the Women`s Team of 1. FC Köln (Cologne), Germany. The Japanese attacker was signed up after trials and scored four goals in her subsequent first six games for 1. FC Köln. In a game against Wolfsburg she showed the data system what the coaches already knew – after running 11,9km, she ran more than any other FC player. When the Japanese national women’s football team won the Women’s World Cup in 2011, Yuka was 15 years old, and she decided she wanted a football career – preferably abroad. Now, at 23 years of age, she is making that dream come true. She has been in Germany since February 2019 and is teaching herself German. She doesn’t yet know how long she will remain in Germany, and her goal is to play in as many different footballing countries as possible, preferably in Europe and America. “I want to get to know different cultures and experience as many things as possible” says Yuka.


Christian Tagsold
Christian Tagsold is at the Department of Modern Japanese Studies, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf. He has previously researched the Tokyo Olympics in 1964 and its role for re-establishing national identity in Japan after World War II. He has broad experience in organising sports mega-events. He was a member of the Local Organising Committee for the FIFA Confed Cup 2005, the FIFA World Cup 2006, and the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2011. He will interpret Japanese-English for Yuka Hirano as well as talk about his time with the Japanese women’s team in FIFA events.


Konul Nurullayeva

Konul conducts research at the University of Azerbaijan and is on the Executive MBA program at the Swiss Business University. She worked for the National Olympic Committee of Azerbaijan as Director of International Relations for over 10 years. She was the youngest and the first female chef de mission in the history of the Olympic Games to represent her national team in Vancouver (2010) and Sochi (2014) Winter Olympic Games. She was deputy chef de mission during the Summer Olympic Games in Beijing (2008) and London (2012). She was the youngest female CEO of “Baku 2020” (Olympic Games Bid Committee) in the history of the Olympic movement. In 2015 she was a member of the Board of Directors of the Inaugural European Games and chef de mission of the biggest team in the history of Azerbaijan. She is the first female representative from Azerbaijan to be elected in the European Olympic Committees’ “Gender Equality in Sport” Commission. In 2013 she was elected as the first female member to the Executive Board of the Islamic Solidarity Sports Federation (ISSF). She is Director of the “Gender Equality” Commission of the ISSF and member of the Coordination Commission of the 5th Islamic Solidarity Games - “Konya 2021”. She is fluent in Azerbaijani, Russian and English.


Panel Commentators

Nefeli Chondrogianni
Nefeli is a passionate sports professional and an advocate for women sports development. From her position as Communications and Technical Affairs Manager at Fatima Bint Mubarak Ladies Sports Academy (FBMA), a government entity of Abu Dhabi – UAE, she oversees the expansion of the Emirate’s women sports offering by planning and implementing various initiatives that aim to make sports a part of every Emirati woman’s daily life. 'She is studying for a PhD in Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent (UK) on the topic of social impact of international non-mega sports events on local communities supervised by Dr Dikaia Chatziefstathiou and Dr Simon Hoult. She has an M.A. in Sport Management from the London Metropolitan University, UK, and an M.Sc. in Exercise and Quality of Life, from the University of Thrace, Greece.


Dikaia Chatziefstathiou
Dikaia is an expert in Olympic Studies and her work on Olympism has been widely published and cited. In the most recent work, she applies the theory and methodology adopted in her Olympic research into the world of football unpacking issues of power in the dressing rooms. She is Director of Research Environment and Knowledge Exchange, and a Reader in Olympic Studies & the Social Analysis of Sport at the School of Human and Life Sciences in Canterbury Christ Church University, UK. She is also an International Research Expert of the Centre for Olympic Studies & Research (COS&R) at Loughborough University, UK; and a Senior Associate of the Hibou Alliance of sports professionals worldwide. She is the winner of the inaugural Coubertin Prize 2008 awarded by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the International Pierre de Coubertin Committee (IPCC) for her qualitative research on Pierre de Coubertin’s writings and speeches.


Mara Yamauchi

Mara Yamauchi is a former elite British marathon runner and diplomat. A two-time Olympian, she is the second fastest British marathon runner ever, with a PB of 2:23:12. She grew up in Kenya, and has lived in Japan for many years as a diplomat and professional athlete. Mara finished 6th in the 2008 Beijing Olympic marathon – the best performance ever by a British woman in this event – and was runner-up in the 2009 London marathon. She also competed for Team GB at the 2012 London Olympics. In January 2013 Mara retired from elite competition and now works as a running coach, commentator and motivational speaker. She lives in London.


Photo Credit: Marimo Images

Simon Rofe
Simon is Reader in Diplomatic and International Studies in the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, and Programme Director for MA Global Diplomacy, at SOAS University of London. His research focuses upon diplomacy, international and global history, with a particular focus on the diplomacy of sport. He is the author and editor of a number of books and academic articles including “Sport and Society: Games within Games” (Manchester University Press, 2018).


 

  1. 'She is studying for a PhD in Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent (UK) on the topic of social impact of international non-mega sports events on local communities supervised by Dr Dikaia Chatziefstathiou and Dr Simon Hoult.'

Date: 11 March 2020 from 5.00pm - 7.00pm

This event is free to attend but registration is essential

Organised by:  
Sponsored by:  
 
Supported by:  
Part of:  
   
Back to Top

Rakugo Performance and Introductory Lecture for Japanese Language Education and Japanese Intellectual Studies   org

The traditional art of one-man story-telling, Rakugo, has been enthralling audiences in Japan since the nineteenth century. A single figure sits in the traditional seiza style on stage and ensnares his audience using a fan, a cloth and his own voice. Although many Rakugo stories are comedic, there are many types of dramatic stories performed by Rakugo masters and beloved by audiences.

We are honoured to be offering those involved in Japanese language education and Japanese intellectual studies (both students and teachers) an opportunity to participate in our online Rakugo Performance and Introductory Lecture Event. Yanagiya Sankyō and Ryūtei Saryū, two renowned masters of Rakugo, will showcase their incredible skills with two performances. Professor Kazumi Hatasa of Purdue University, an expert in Rakugo, will give an explanatory lecture on the art of Rakugo performance. Professor Hatasa has conducted research into how the traditional art of Rakugo can be used to enhance Japanese language education.

The purpose of this event is not only so participants can enjoy extraordinary Rakugo performances, but also so they can gain a deeper understanding of Rakugo as an art form and how Rakugo can be utilised for the purpose of Japanese language education and Japanese intellectual studies.

This event will take place entirely online and is limited to participants who are involved in Japanese language and Japanese intellectual studies at an undergraduate or postgraduate university level.

Applications for this event are now CLOSED as the event is fully booked. We thank you for your interest in this event.

If you have submitted an application form, we will be contacting you soon as to whether you were successful. We thank you for your patience.

Important: As stated on this event information page, this event is for "students and teachers involved in Japanese language education and Japanese intellectual studies in the United Kingdom and Europe" at an "undergraduate or postgraduate university level". We will therefore prioritise the applications of those who meet this eligibility criteria. We apologise for any disappointment caused.

The deadline for applications is 19th June 2020 (Friday). (Applications are now CLOSED due to the event reaching capacity)

The lecture will be held in English, and the performances will be in Japanese with English subtitles.

Date/Time: 25th June (Thursday), 10:00am – 11:30am (BST), 11:00am – 12:30am (CET).

Location: Online event using Zoom software. Find out about Zoom here.

Speakers and Performers:

Yanagiya Sankyō (Rakugo performer, recipient of the 2014 Japan Foundation Award)

Ryūtei Saryū (Rakugo Performer)

Professor Kazumi Hatasa (Professor of Japanese, Purdue University)

Participants: Students and teachers involved in Japanese language education and Japanese intellectual studies in the United Kingdom and Europe.

Maximum Participants: 100

 

Schedule:

  • Opening remarks
  • Introduction to Rakugo (Professor Kazumi Hatasa)
  • Demonstration of gestures used in Rakugo (Yanagiya Sankyō with Professor Hatasa)
  • Rakugo Performances (Yanagiya Sankyō and Ryūtei Saryū)
    • Performance one: Ryūtei Saryū performing “Tsuru”
    • Performance two: Yanagiya Sankyō performing “Ikuyo-mochi
  • Questions and Answers (in English and Japanese)
  • Close

Profile of Performers and Speakers

Yanagiya Sankyō

Yanagiya Sankyō (stage name) is a Rakugo Master from Tokyo. He has been a Rakugo performer since 1967 and achieved Shin’Uchi Rakugo Storyteller Master status (the highest Rakugo rank) in 1981. Currently, he is the Permanent Director of the Rakugo Association. Yanagiya Sankyō was a recipient of the Japan Foundation Award in 2014, for his work incorporating Rakugo in the field of Japanese language education. In 2017 he was given the Medal of Honour with Purple Ribbon by Japan. He has performed Rakugo all over the world, including in the USA, Europe and South Korea.

Ryūtei Saryū

Ryūtei Saryū (stage name) is a Rakugo Master from Kashiwa City in Chiba Prefecture. He began performing Rakugo in 1993. Ryūtei Saryū was an apprentice of Yanagiya Sankyō from 1993. He was promoted to Shin’Uchi Rakugo Master Storyteller status (the highest Rakugo rank) in 2006.  He has performed Rakugo all over the world, including in Europe. From 2013 he has been working as a part-time lecturer at Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, teaching about Edo culture and Rakugo.

Professor Kazumi Hatasa

Kazumi Hatasa received his Ph.D. in Education from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1989. He started teaching at Purdue University in 1988, and is currently a professor in School of Languages and Cultures. He was Director of the School of Japanese at Middlebury College from 2004 to 2018. He has been working with professional performers to introduce students to Rakugo and Yose.


Date: 25 June 2020 from 10.00am - 11.30am
Back to Top

The Second Zoom Online Get-Together   org

Calling all secondary school teachers of Japanese! We will be holding a second Zoom Online Get-Together. This is a great opportunity to talk with your colleagues about your work in a relaxed, casual setting. We hope you can use this as a chance to talk about any issues you are facing in the classroom, exchange information on exams, and more.

 

As well as group discussion sessions, Mrs Satoko Suzui from the University of Bath will be giving a talk on the theme of Tips for Making Teaching Resources for Busy Teachers”. Mrs Suzui used to be a secondary school teacher of Japanese and has a wealth of experience developing teaching resources for GCSE & A-level.

 

Date:

-          28th January 2021 (Thursday), 19:00 to 20:30

 

Schedule:

-          First half: Presentation by Mrs Satoko Suzui (University of Bath)

-          Second half: Group discussion

 

To apply, please click here.

https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/1S4SO5/

 

You can read some comments from participants of the first Zoom Online Get-Together below:

  • It was really good to join in with fellow Japanese colleagues from around the country (and world!) and listen and see in Japanese how these colleagues created and use these resources.
  • An excellent opportunity to meet and share.
  • I spent a hugely worthwhile time getting to talk with other teachers that I do not often get a chance to meet and exchange new information.

Date: 28 January 2021 from 7.00pm - 8.30pm
Venue:

Online event.

Back to Top

The Place of Japanese Cinema in the UK
The Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2021 Online Special - Talk Series
  org

 

Geographically, Japan is 6000 miles away from the UK but the position of Japanese cinema may be much closer to the hearts of some Brits. Thanks to the enormous efforts and enthusiasm of UK-based cinema experts belonging to such organisations as BFI, ICA, and many film festivals, certain names from Japan’s catalogue of filmmakers - Kurosawa, Mizoguchi or more recently Kitano and Miike, to name a few - are permanently engraved in this nation’s cinematic history. Two decades into the 21st century, is the admiration felt for Japanese film by British people still going strong? Has the perception of Japanese cinema changed?

Celebrating the very first online edition of The Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme, on the launch night of the season, we have invited a cinema programmer, a critic and an academic mainly representing the next generation of UK film experts to informally discuss what Japanese cinema means to them and what the current position of Japanese cinema is in this country, while candidly exploring if the Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme, which marks its 18th year, has indeed made any impact on the people’s perception.

 

About the panellists

 

Alex Davidson (moderator), Cinema Curator at the Barbican

Jennifer Coates, Senior Lecturer in Japanese Studies, The University of Sheffield

Peter Munford, Satori Screen Programmer at QUAD, Derby

Ren Scateni, Freelance Critic and Curator based in Edinburgh

Junko Takekawa, Senior Arts Programme Officer, the Japan Foundation London

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please click here.


Date: 19 February 2021 from 6.00pm

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

BATJ-JF Spring Seminar - Exploring and Reflecting on Classes in an Online Setting: How can we cultivate ICT literacy for teachers of Japanese?   org

This Seminar will be organised by the Japan Foundation, London and the British Association for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language. Each year, we use these seminars as an opportunity to raise practical, every-day themes that apply to both younger and older learners at all types of educational institutions, and invite educators at the forefront of their fields, to provide a novel and exciting learning opportunity. It is our hope that through this year’s seminar we can once again contribute to the development of the community of educators of the Japanese language. We look forward to receiving applications from teachers from a wide variety of locations.

Event Outline

  • Date/Time: 14th March 2021 (Sunday), 10:30 to 12:30 GMT
  • Theme: Exploring and Reflecting on Classes in an Online Setting: How can we cultivate ICT literacy for teachers of Japanese? (Keywords: online environments, active learning, ICT literacy)
  • Speaker: Dr Tomohisa Yamada (Associate Professor at Hokkaido University)
  • Target audience: Japanese language educators in the United Kingdom and Europe.   (We will also accept applications from those in other regions, depending on the number of applicants).  Post-graduate university students specialising in Japanese language education in the United Kingdom and Europe are also welcomed to join.
  • Maximum number of participants: 150
  • Location: Online seminar using Zoom software
  • Spoken language: Japanese
  • Planned schedule: Following the seminar, there will be an optional social gathering from 12:30
  • Cost of seminar/applications: This is posted on the BATJ website. 
  • Organisers: The Japan Foundation, London and the British Association for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language.

To apply to attend this seminar, please visit the Seminar page on the BATJ website using the link below: 

Seminars & Workshops (batj.org.uk)

 

Speaker Profile: Dr. Tomohisa Yamada

Associate Professor at Hokkaido University (Institute for the Advancement of Higher Education/ Graduate School of International Media-Communication and Tourism Studies) 

Dr Yamada has an MA from the Institute of Education, University of London, and a doctorate (academic) from Hokkaido University. After working with the University of London School of Oriental and African Studies Language Centre and Saga University Exchange Student Centre, he assumed his present post in 2012. His area of research is educational technology and teacher education. As well as his research activities, he is actively involved in giving lectures and professional development programmes aimed at increasing ICT literacy for teachers of Japanese. He was awarded the Hokkaido University Excellent Teachers award (2014 to 2019). Among his key publications are “Practical Use of ICT (Second Edition)” (sole author), “Active Learning for Teachers of Japanese” (co-author) and “Creating Online Classes for Japanese Language Educators ” (author and editor; scheduled to be published) (All published by Kuroshio Shuppan).

Message from Dr Yamada:

In the spring of 2020, the structure of the world was hugely altered due to Covid-19. Our social lives were restricted, and it was decided that educators and students in educational facilities would move their classes online for just a few weeks. Under these circumstance, information and questions began flying back and forth between educators: What actually are online classes? How can I organise group activities online? I’ve found this useful ICT tool! And so on. Even the teachers who were initially able to keep up with all of the information out there found themselves at some point confused by the huge quantity of all the information out there. At the very least, this was the situation I found myself in.

A year has passed since then. Looking at the world, it appears that online learning is becoming the de facto standard. What have we learnt over the past turbulent year? How should educators approach “classes” and “students” from now on?

In this lecture, I want us to work together to compare the advantages and disadvantages of online classes compared to face-to-face classes, and to try to think about what factors we should be mindful of in realizing interactive online classes. Furthermore, I would like to introduce some of the new insights/knowledge obtained from the Japan Foundation, London ICT Literacy Course that took place in the 2020 fiscal year, regarding what are the key important points to increase ICT literacy for educators.


Date: 14 March 2021 from 10.30am
Venue:

Online.


Back to Top

Summer Explorers 2019   org

Our annual Summer Explorers season is back as a summer treat - now with new venue and dates!

From over the top, offbeat narratives of psychic teenagers and upstart political wrangling in a high school environment, to spectacular battles between good and evil, and stories of tender friendships, Summer Explorers 2019 showcases the range of plotlines that manga has provided film creatives over the years.

Come and see the versatility of the influence that manga has had on Japanese cinema!

Curated and Presented by the Japan Foundation.

16 August

17 August

20 August


Date: 16 August 2019 - 20 August 2019
Venue:

Screen 1 | The Soho Hotel | 4 Richmond Mews | London W1D 3DH


Back to Top

How Do They Read? Voices and Practices of Japanese Literature Translators   org

 

For many years, Japanese literature has been respected by enthusiastic readers globally, providing joy and invoking a curiosity about a world they have never stepped into. This passion has recently extended to many newly released contemporary novels, with proof evident in the “Convenience Store Woman” becoming a worldwide phenomenon. Arguably, it is the heyday of contemporary Japanese authors of high calibre.

However, the efforts, influence, as well as the responsibility of literary translators should not be overlooked. Foreign readers are in effect reading the text and seeing the world that is recreated by them. Quite simply translators are authors by proxy.

What approach does a good translator take when reading the original text in order to convey the original ideas into another language?

Inviting three experienced translators of Japanese literature, Prof. Stephen Dodd, Polly Barton and Ginny Tapley Takemori, this talk aims to reveal the daily practices of translation behind the scenes and to discuss how these professionals overcome not only the difference in language but also in culture, in order to make the work as true to the original as possible while ensuring it is entertaining for an English audience.

 

Prof Stephen Dodd (Moderator)

Stephen Dodd is Professor Emeritus of Japanese Literature at SOAS, University of London. He has written widely on modern Japanese literature. He is author of Writing Home: Representations of the Native Place in Modern Japanese Literature (Harvard University Asia Center, 2004), and The Youth of Things: Life and Death in the Age of Kajii Motojirō (Hawai’i University Press, 2014.). His translation of Mishima Yukio’s Life for Sale (Inochi urimasu, 1968) was published through Penguin in 2019, and he is now translating Mishima’s sci-fi novel, Beautiful Star (Utsukushii hoshi, 1962).

 

Polly Barton

Polly Barton is a translator of Japanese literature and non-fiction, based in the UK. Recent translations include Spring Garden by Tomoka Shibasaki (Pushkin Press) and Where the Wild Ladies Are by Aoko Matsuda (Tilted Axis/Soft Skull Press). Her translation of Kikuko Tsumura's There's No Such Thing as an Easy Job is upcoming from Bloomsbury. After being awarded the 2019 Fitzcarraldo Editions Essay Prize, she is currently working on a non-fiction book entitled Fifty Sounds.

 

Ginny Tapley Takemori

Ginny Tapley Takemori is a Japan-based literary translator who has translated over a dozen Japanese authors, from Meiji greats Izumi Kyoka and Koda Rohan to contemporary bestsellers Ryu Murakami, Miyabe Miyuki, Akiyuki Nosaka, and Kyoko Nakajima. Her translation of Sayaka Murata’s Convenience Store Woman was selected Book of the Year by Foyles book shop and numerous publications including The New Yorker. Her translation of Murata’s Earthlings will be published this autumn, while Things Remembered and Things Forgotten, by Kyoko Nakajima, co-translated with Ian MacDonald, is forthcoming in Spring 2021.

 

Please note that this online event will be hosted on Zoom.

For More information, please click here


Date: 18 June 2020 from 12.00pm
Back to Top

Kobanashi Workshop for Educators – Kobanashi Performance Instruction Methods to Teach Japanese Language Learners   org

The Japan Foundation, London

 

Kobanashi Workshop for Educators – Kobanashi Performance Instruction Methods to Teach Japanese Language Learners

Workshop Format:Online(Zoom software)

Dates

Time

Number of Participants

30th October 2020 (Fri)

17:00 - 19:00(GMT Greenwich Meantime)

15

31st October 2020 (Sat)

15:00 - 17:00(GMT Greenwich Meantime)

15

Instructor:Dr. Kazumi Hatasa(Purdue University, United States of America; Chair, Dept. of East Asian Language and Cultures, SLC, Asian Studies Faculty).

Guidelines for Prospective Participants:PDF Sign-Up Guidelines

The application form link is included on the Sign-Up Guidelines PDF. We would like to ask prospective participants to read the guidelines carefully and then fill out the application form. 

※Sign-Up Deadline: 5th October (Monday), 17:00 (BST)


Date: 30 October 2020 - 31 October 2020
Back to Top

[Online Event] Reframing Japanese Narratives for the UK Stage   org

 

In recent years there has been a noticeable trend in new UK productions made for the stage to be sourcing their ground material not only from Japanese plays but also through adapting other forms of Japanese media, such as anime, literature, or film. Be it a direct adaptation or simply taking inspiration, the communication of the culture which the original is steeped in is not entirely removed from the creation process. The culmination of such adaptations results in distinct visions of Japanese culture reframed to suit the message of their creators and lend relatability to their native audiences.

In celebration of After Life, adapted for the stage from Hirokazu Kore-eda’s feature film and to be presented at the National Theatre between 2 June and 24 July 2021, we invited a group of UK theatre professionals – who have looked towards Japan for source materials in their respective productions – to join an informal roundtable talk aimed at exploring the significance of looking at other languages and art forms in conceptualising new works, and any challenges that may be faced in doing so.

*Please note: Contrary to earlier announcements, Jack McNamara will no longer participate in the event. In his place we welcome Franko Figueiredo (more information below).

 

 

About the panellists

(Moderator) Professor Ken Rea is a theatre director, acting teacher, and author of the bestseller, The Outstanding Actor, Seven Keys to Success. After working as a leading actor and director in New Zealand, where he founded the Living Theatre Troupe, he studied theatre in Bali, Java, India, China and Japan, as well as studying with leading European teachers. Today, at the renowned Guildhall School of Music & Drama, where he is Professor of Theatre, Ken has trained some of Britain's leading actors, bringing to them his unique process, influenced by his research in Asian theatre. Through his corporate training Ken has also made a striking difference to thousands of business leaders. And as a journalist, he has been a regular feature writer for The Times and was for 15 years a theatre critic for The Guardian. As a public speaker, Ken gives many large-scale presentations in the worlds of business and the arts.

Franko Figueiredo is the co-founder and artistic director of StoneCrabs Theatre Company. Franko and StoneCrabs Theatre Company have been running yearly drama workshops in Japan since 2006. He has directed all of Mishima's Modern Noh plays in English for StoneCrabs to great critical acclaim, including Sotoba Komachi (Metro and Time Out Critics Choice); Busu (Mishima’s take on the Kyogen play of the same name), and The Damask Drum (International tour, Pick of the EdFringe 2017). Franko also directed Asphalt Kiss, a co-production between One Two Works and StoneCrabs at Owl Spot Theatre, Tokyo in 2018. Currently they are collaborating with Busu Theatre on a new production inspired by tales of loneliness and Japanese folklore.

Jeremy Herrin trained as a theatre director at both the National Theatre and the Royal Court, where he became Deputy Artistic Director in 2008. He became Artistic Director of Headlong Theatre in September 2013. In 2009, Jeremy directed Polly Stenham's play, Tusk Tusk for which he was nominated for an Evening Standard Best Director Award. In 2012 he was named as one of the Stage top 100. In 2014 Jeremy directed the critically acclaimed adaptations of Hilary Mantel's novels Wolf Hall and Bring up the Bodies for the RSC and was nominated for an Olivier Award for Best Director. The productions transferred to the West End at the end of 2014 and opened on Broadway in April 2015. Most recently he directed Noises Off at The Garrick Theatre and The Visit at The National Theatre. For TV Jeremy directed Talking Heads and Unprecedented for the BBC.

Yojiro Ichikawa is a director who has been working in the UK, US, EU and Japan, in various kinds of theatre including musical, drama and physical theatre. He founded and has been the Artistic Director of a UK theatre company Théatre Lapis, which aim is to question traditional boundaries including those that exist between genres or cultures, and to seek other frontiers. His directing credits include Letter from the Sea at Polish Theatre Bydgoszcz and the New National Theatre Tokyo, Tell Me On A Sunday at the New National Theatre Tokyo which won a Yomiuri drama award, The Red Candle based on Mimei Ogawa’s Novel, at the Brunel Museum and was also appreciated by Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, Pearl and Dagger at The Other Palace, a new musical created through the collaboration between the British and Japanese creatives, and KUWENTO an online production based on Japanese folktales.

Alexandra Rutter is a director and producer of Anglo-Japanese collaborative theatre, and an ambassador for inter-cultural productions based on Japanese source material. She founded and has been director of UK Theatre company, Whole Hog Theatre since 2012 and is currently a Resident Director and Producer at Nelke Planning: a leading Japanese producer of “2.5 Dimensional Musicals” (theatre based on Japanese animation, comics and video games). Her most notable work includes: Creative Director on Magia Record (Madoka Magica Franchise) starring idol group Keyakizaka46, and Director of the world’s first stage production of a Hayao Miyazaki film Princess Mononoke (with the kind permission of Studio Ghibli). Most recent credits include the postponed 2020 production of the world’s first stage adaptation of The Garden of Words, based on the Anime by Makoto Shinkai and CoMix Wave films.

 

Special thanks to the National Theatre and IGAWA Togo.

 

Please note that this will be an Online Event held on Zoom.

 

This online event is free to attend but places are limited and registration is essential. To reserve your space, please book your ticket here.

 


Date: 17 June 2021 from 6.30pm

For more information, please click here.

Back to Top

Artist Talk by Keiko Takemiya   org

 

Keiko Takemiya is arguably one of the most influential manga artists in Japan. Starting her career as an artist in late 1960 while still a teenager, her fame rapidly grew to stardom. This reached a new height in the 1970s when she became a seminal member of “the Fabulous Year 24 Group” – a new wave of female authors that revolutionised manga by developing new drawing techniques and introducing unconventional subject matters to the genre of girls’ manga, such as science fiction, fantasy, as well as boys’ love. Takemiya’s representative manga, The Poem of Wind and Trees (1976-84), which has sold nearly 5 million copies so far, is praised by critics and readers alike as a monumental work that laid the foundation for the rapidly growing genre of boys’ love within manga. In addition to her creative work, Takemiya has been a great advocate of preserving this nation-specific graphic art form as a cultural asset and was the first manga artist in Japan to be elected as President of an academic institution.

During this very special talk and in a rare appearance Takemiya, in conversation with comics historian Paul Gravett, will discuss her extensive career as one of Japan’s leading manga artists, and her inspirations behind iconic works such as To Terra… (1977-80) which shaped the precedent for female manga artists to create stories for a young male readership. Reflecting on the development of the narrative art form in Japan, she will also review what manga has meant to her and the society at large.


Date: 25 August 2019 from 2.30pm
Venue:

Foyles Bookstore, 107 Charing Cross Road, WC2H 0DT London


For more information, please click here.

This event is held in collaboration with Foyles.

And in Partnership with:

Celebrating:

 

Image Credit: ©To Terra…, KeikoTAKEMIYA

Back to Top

Born Into A Noh Family: How the New Generation is Keeping the Tradition Alive   org

 

Noh is a traditional Japanese performing art with a history of almost 600 years. Comprising both music and dance, the extremely sophisticated and stylised body movements of the performers and the wearing of elegant masks to identify the characters make Noh distinctive. Alongside Kyogen, which developed in parallel, the significance of Noh performance to global performing arts was recognised by UNESCO in 2008, when it was designated as Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Compared to Kabuki, there are comparatively fewer obstacles on the path towards becoming a Noh performer. Anybody who wishes to learn the Noh art form can do so, regardless of their gender or origin. Nonetheless, becoming a professional is a long process of perfecting the skill over the course of many years, and those who are born into a Noh lineage often have their future predetermined in order to keep this very intricate tradition alive.

How do these new generations settle into their fated roles? How much dedication is necessary to carry on creating an enduring legacy?

In this special online talk, the Japan Foundation has invited Noh performer TAKEDA Takafumi, a direct descendant of an established Noh family, to share his experience of being born into such specific circumstances. In conversation with Dr Ashley Thorpe (Royal Holloway, University of London) who specialises in Noh, Takeda will reveal the daily practices he has followed since childhood, his views on the pursuit of keeping the tradition alive, as well as how he and his family adapt to the changes and challenges of the present day.


TAKEDA Takafumi

Board member of Noh Shо̄ Kai.

Born in Tokyo in 1989 as the second son of TAKEDA Naohiro, a Shite (main role) Noh actor of Kanze-Ryū School. Since his debut at the age 3, Takafumi has studied and been trained under his father. He has taken part in about 100 performances every year in which he took on the intricate Shite role several times. In addition to this, he has been involved in projects run by Gyokuto no Kai, which support victims of the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake. He has also been active in the promotion of Noh performances through various workshops and other activities as part of the Ōryū no Kai projects which center on conveying the appeal of Noh. His Shite role repertoire includes his performance in Shyakkyo in 2018, and he is scheduled to perform as Shite once again in Midare in 2020.

Dr Ashley Thorpe

Ashley Thorpe is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Drama, Theatre & Dance at Royal Holloway. He has studied Noh in the Kita School for ten years and is a member of the theatre company Theatre Nohgaku. In 2011, he established the only annual intensive Noh training programme in Europe, Noh Training Project UK, with Richard Emmert and Matsui Akira. He has written and performed his own English Noh, Emily (London, 2019), and performed alongside the Ōshima family of Noh actors in the touring production of Janette Cheong’s Between The Stones (London, Ireland, Paris, 2020).


Please note that this online event will be hosted on Zoom.


Date: 2 July 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival Screenings and Special Talk Events   org

 

The Japan Foundation London and Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival have teamed up!

We've partnered with Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival, which is back this October to celebrate its 10th anniversary, on free, online and live screenings on their YouTube channel. Four screenings will be presented, with short film programmes featuring award winning film makers and emerging talents from various universities across Japan.

Date: 24 and 25 October, at various times

 

In addition to the free streaming of some of the most innovative and inspiring Japanese animation works, we offer you opportunities to virtually meet the creators behind them. From knitting to clay, you will see how versatile Japanese animation techniques can be. 

All events listed below are free and take place online via Zoom. Join us in this creative hub, wherever you may be!

 

Knitting into Animation

Online Talk with YATA Miho and YODA Takeshi

Who could have imagined that colourful wool threads could be transformed into a cute and fun animation with lots of sheep! YATA Miho, a Japanese animation creator, mesmerized viewers when her work was streamed as part of the Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival special in July.  Together with YODA Takeshi, composer and theremin player who performed the memorable music in The King of Amechau Country, they will talk about their creative processes and their sources of inspiration in this online talk. Their presentations will be followed by a conversation with Abigail Addison.

Saturday, 24 October from 13:00 (BST)

Book here.

 

 

Animation Workshop with ARAI Chie

Online Workshop

ARAI Chie is the creator behind the twinkling and friendly mascot of the Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival. She is also an animator who created the festival’s opening animations and other short films. Her drawings are quite often seen in the form of flip books, and bring to mind a similarity to manga. In this workshop, she will explain where the idea for the cute character came from, illustrating step-by-step the process of her creation. Participants will be invited to join a brief session in which they can try and test their skill on paper to check their potential for being a future animator! Moderated by Shangomola, a London based manga artist.

Sunday, 25 October from 12:00 (BST)

Book here.

 

 

Clay Metamorphosis

Online Talk with YUSAKI Fusako

Having lived and worked in Italy, YUSAKI Fusako is an award-wining female creator and a pioneer of Japanese clay animation. Metamorphosing clay into a lively animation rich in colours defines her work and her philosophy: nothing remains the same. In this very special talk, in conversation with Robin Lyons – a producer of animation works and the Managing Director of Calon – YUSAKI will explore her long-standing career and how her life and work has changed shape like the ever-malleable materials she loves.  This is a rare opportunity not to be missed.

Sunday, 25 October from 14:00 (BST)

Book here.


Date: 24 October 2020 - 25 October 2020

In partnership with:

Back to Top

Sayaka Murata Exclusive Recorded Interview at Cheltenham Literature Festival + LIVE Q&A   org

 

Online Events in partnership with the Japan Foundation

SAYAKA MURATA returns to Cheltenham Literature Festival
with an Exclusive Recorded Interview followed by a LIVE Q&A Session

One of the most celebrated of the new generation of Japanese writers, SAYAKA MURATA has won not only the prestigious Akutagawa Prize, but the Gunzo, Noma, and Mishima Yukio Prizes, been named a Freeman’s ‘Future of New Writing’ author, a Vogue Japan Woman of the Year and her novel Convenience Store Woman (trans. Ginny Tapley Takemori) became a global sensation. She returns with Earthlings (trans. Takemori), a shocking, wild and funny tale of a young woman who is convinced she is an alien and a powerful exploration of finding freedom from familial and societal expectations. In this special conversation she speaks with The New York Times Tokyo bureau chief Motoko Rich from her home in Tokyo and gives an insight into her literary life in the city.

 

Registration Information:

(Please note that the LIVE Q&A Session requires a separate booking)

Recorded Interview streaming at 10:00am (BST) - please click here

LIVE Q&A Session starting at 11:00am (BST) – please click here

 

Online Event in partnership with the Japan Foundation 

SAYAKA MURATA returns to Cheltenham Literature Festival  

with an Exclusive Recorded Interview followed by a LIVE Q&A Session

One of the most celebrated of the new generation of Japanese writers, SAYAKA MURATA has won not only the prestigious Akutagawa Prize, but the Gunzo, Noma, and Mishima Yukio Prizes, been named a Freeman’s ‘Future of New Writing’ author, a Vogue Japan Woman of the Year and her novel Convenience Store Woman (trans. Ginny Tapley Takemori) became a global sensation. She returns with Earthlings (trans. Takemori), a shocking, wild and funny tale of a young woman who is convinced she is an alien and a powerful exploration of finding freedom from familial and societal expectations. In this special conversation she speaks with The New York Times Tokyo bureau chief Motoko Rich from her home in Tokyo and gives an insight into her literary life in the city.


Date: 3 October 2020
Back to Top

The Art of the Pinch: A Lecture and Demonstration on Tsumami Zaiku   org

 

Tsumami zaiku is a traditional Japanese craft that enjoys a long history of some 200 years. By folding and pinching colourful pieces of cloth, the technique enables you to create day-to-day accessories, including ornamental combs and hairpins (kanzashi), with elaborate and intricate designs such as delicate flowers and birds. It is believed that the wife of a daimyo (lord) and her lady-in-waiting started tsumami zaiku as a hobby. Over the years, however, the craft has been adopted into the lives of society at large with many women matching a variety of these handmade accessories to their ceremonial kimono worn at annual festivals or on special occasions. Furthermore, in recently years, tsumami zaiku has become stylish in popular culture, appealing to followers of contemporary fashion in and outside Japan.

With this in mind, we have invited YAMASHITA Tomomi, an official instructor of the technique, to lead a lecture on brief history of the artistry, describing how this handmade technique can be applied to and is enjoyed in modern times. She will then demonstrate the tsumami-making method, introducing the range of tools, techniques, fabrics, and explain the basics of fixing and assembling the piece so that you can create your very own design at home.

Joining YAMASHITA is Cora Fung, a practitioner of tsumami zaiku based in the UK who has been fascinated by the craft. She will define her own attraction to the craft, displaying examples of her own work as a way to show you how inclusive this hobby is of creators outside of Japan.

If you wish to craft alongside with us in real-time, we suggest you prepare for the session with the necessary materials listed below.

Join us and bring your own tsumami zaiku idea to life, be it an ornamental hairpin or an early Christmas decoration! All ages and skill levels welcome.

 

Materials for a simple one petal demonstration:

  • Woodworking glue
  • 2-3 pieces of square cloth (about 4 cm). Fabric with bonds such as thin cotton is best.
  • If you have some, tapered long tweezers. If not, there may be alternative instructions on folding by hand.
  • Something flat to lay underneath the materials (for those who want to use starch glue). You can find out how to make starch glue by clicking here.

 

About the speakers

YAMASHITA Tomomi is a Certified Instructor of the Tsumami Zaiku Association. She has hosted workshops for some 500 visitors from over 30 countries around the world. In 2019, she has also launched the ‘Tsumami kanzashi’ website to pass on the traditions of and information on tsumami zaiku. So far, the website has been visited by people from over 50 countries and can be found here: tsumami-kanzashi.com/

Cora Fung is a self-taught tsumami zaiku artist based in Sheffield. She has been practising the craft for three and a half years and has created a wide range of accessories and artwork. Apart from traditional subjects such as chrysanthemum and crane, she also creates modern patterns and objects such as angel wings, ocean waves, and umbrellas. She trades under the trade name Takara Crafts and her crafts have been showcased in various craft fairs and exhibitions in the Yorkshire area and Manchester.

 

This talk has been made possible with the kind assistance of Kayoko Tezuka, Tuning for the Future (TFF) in Japan.

http://www.npo-tff.org

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please click here.


Date: 28 November 2020 from 11.00am

For more information, please click here.

Celebrating:

Back to Top

Free Japanese Film Streaming!   org

 

During this unprecedented situation we all find oursleves in, we believe it important to share the beauty of Japanese cinema through free streaming services. The below links will take you to two film sharing initiatives that the Japan Foundation has been involved in.

We hope you enjoy the complimentary access these films while they are available!

'Asian Three-Fold Mirror 2016: Reflections'

A great opportunity to watch three fantastic pieces of cinema produced by the Japan Foundation Asia Centre and Tokyo International Film Festival. A journey through space and time!

Available online until June 30, 2020


Moosic Lab X Japanese Film Festival

Thanks to Moosic Lab, our film festival in Asia has set up a free streaming service where you can watch both feature and short Japanese indie films.

No subscription needed!

Expires early June 2020


Date: 29 April 2020 - 30 June 2020
Back to Top

MANGA in a global society: the origins and development of a genre – Special Lecture with Fusanosuke Natsume, Manga Critic and Columnist   org

We are delighted to welcome Professor Fusanosuke Natsume to give a lecture on manga in global society.

The term manga originated in China; it was first employed in Japan in the Edo period (1608-1868). The most representative example of its use in Japan is Hokusai manga (fifteen volumes issued serially between 1814 and 1819 and then in 1830s and 1840s with the final volume appearing in 1878), however, the meaning of the word in the Edo period was not the same as the meaning of manga today. In the Meiji period (1868-1912), in response to the shock of western culture, the printing technologies, distribution and production processes were all modernized. Aware of its connections with Japan’s traditional culture, the word manga was redefined as a new genre. After that, under the influence of European and American caricatures and cartoons, manga, as a medium, came to include aspects of both. Today, when we use the word ‘manga’, in most of cases, we mean MANGA created after 1980s. Are the manga in Japan and manga read by a global audience the same? Or are they different?

Known in Japan as a manga critic and columnist, Professor Fusanosuke Natsume teaches critical studies on manga and animation at Gakushuin University. He was awarded the Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize in 1999. During the course of his career, he has engaged in debates surrounding manga as ‘anti-art’ seen many attempts to create exhibitions of manga, and explored the boundaries between manga in Japan and graphic novels, bande dessinée and comics from other parts of the world.

 

To reserve your place, please call the Japan Society office on 020 3075 1996, email events@japansociety.org.uk or submit the online booking form.


Date: 19 August 2019 from 6.45pm
Venue:

The Swedenborg Society, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way (Hall entrance on Barter St), London WC1A 2TH


For more information, please click here.

This event is planned by the Japan Society in association with the British Museum and the Japan Foundation.

 

Back to Top

Spirits of Action: Japanese Manga and Sports   org

 

Being an avid manga reader and a sport fanatic may seem to be mutually exclusive characteristics. In Japanese manga history, however, they have always been a good match and played well together in attracting manga fans as well as enthusiastic sports players. From tennis to judo, a huge variety of sports have been a source of inspiration for the ‘sports manga’ form of the graphic novel read by girls, boys, and young adults alike, and the genre has kept driving the market and readership forward. Certain works have gained huge momentum and have become a trend in Japanese society. The genre’s continuing popularity and influence is proven in the fact that many ‘sports manga’ titles have been adapted into other media such as film and animation.

In the lead up to TOKYO2020 (postponed to next year), the Japan Foundation has invited YOSHIMURA Kazuma of Kyoto Seika University to talk about the inseparable relationship between manga and sports. Succinctly tracing its history from post-war to today, YOSHIMURA will discuss the position of ‘sports manga’ in Japanese culture and how its contents have evolved to reflect the time, society and people’s spirits, and indeed how the genre has managed to keep attracting Japanese readers, as well as manga artists, even while changing its shape.

After YOSHIMURA’s presentation, there will be a brief conversation with Rayna Denison.

 

About the speakers

YOSHIMURA Kazuma completed coursework for a Ph.D. program at Ritsumeikan University. He currently serves as the head of the Faculty of Manga, as well as at the International Manga Research Center. His field of research is in the history of philosophy and manga studies. Yoshimura’s published work includes Manga’s Handling of Prejudice (2007), Manga Textbook (2008), Multiple Hiroshima (2012), ‘Chiran’ as a convenient manga experience – Media dynamics of ‘Authentic record on KAMIKAZE’ (printed in The Birth of Chiran, edited by Yoshiaki Fukuma, Makoto Yamazaki, 2015), and Osamu Tezuka – ‘the God of Manga’ fostered by unfavorable wind (printed in Intellectual History of Japanese People Vol.4 (2015, Iwanami Shoten).

Rayna Denison is a Senior Lecturer in and Head of Department for the Film, Television and Media Studies at the University of East Anglia. Her research and teaching interests centre on Japanese film and animation. She is the author of Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury 2015), and the editor of Princess Mononoke: Understanding Studio Ghibli’s Monster Princess (Bloomsbury 2018). Her scholarly articles can be found in many leading journals, including Cinema Journal, Velvet Light Trap, Japan Forum and the International Journal of Cultural Studies.

 

Image credit: 原作/恵本裕子、脚色・構成・作画/小林まこと『JJM 女子柔道部物語』第1巻(講談社、2016年) ©小林まこと/講談社

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please click here.


Date: 28 October 2020 from 12.00pm
Back to Top

A Story in Four Frames - Japanese Yonkoma Manga   org

 

Yonkoma manga is one of a range of manga formats produced in Japan. As the direct translation of the name suggests, it comprises of just 4 frames in which a story starts, develops and ends. Although it may be relatively unknown overseas, this manga style has a long-standing history. Primarily associated with daily printed newspapers for many years, the characters featured in specific yonkoma often could become household names while the storylines tend to develop while reflecting social and political trends. In recent years, there has been a rise in more variation of content but the simplicity and conciseness in telling a story, reminiscent of Japanese haiku, remains the same.

Following the yonkoma manga workshop we held in May 2020, the Japan Foundation has invited SAIKA Tadahiro of Kyoto Seika University to explain the characteristics of yonkoma manga and trace its history to date. SAIKA will also examine the way this classic format, which is embedded in Japanese culture, has evolved over time and in the context of changes in Japanese society, while introducing some of the new wave seen in the world of contemporary yonkoma manga.

A brief conversation with London-based writer, curator, critic and lecturer specialising in international comics, Paul Gravett, will follow SAIKA’s lecture.

 

About the speakers

SAIKA Tadahiro was born in Wakayama, Japan in 1980. He completed his PhD at the Graduate School of Cultural Studies, Kobe University. SAIKA is currently a research fellow at the International Manga Research Center, Kyoto Seika University. His research interests include the social context in which manga is produced and the way in which the gaze towards manga artists has shifted with time. In addition to carrying out his research, he translates and writes articles on manga and also teaches at various universities in Japan.

Paul Gravett, co-founder of Escape magazine and Comica Festival, is a London-based writer, curator, critic and lecturer specialising in international comics. His books include Manga: Sixty Years of Japanese Comics (2004), Great British Comics (2006), Incredibly Strange Comics (2008), Comics Art (2013), Mangasia: The Definitive Guide to Asian Comics (2017) and Posy Simmonds (2019). He also edited 1001 Comics You Must Read Before You Die (2011). He has curated retrospectives of several prominent creators and co-curated Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK for The British Library. In 2017, he curated Mangasia: Wonderlands of Asian Comics, which The Barbican Centre is touring worldwide.

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please click here.


Date: 26 November 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.

Celebrating:

Back to Top

“Course on the Application of ICT for Teachers - Learning ICT Literacy Through Practice”   org

Instructor: Dr. Tomohisa Yamada, Hokkaido University Associate Professor

Guidelines for Applicants

At the Japan Foundation, London, we create and offer quality professional development programmes for educators in Japanese language education.

This newly developed online course aims to help teachers to update and increase their ICT literacy skills. Participants will be invited to be a member of our safe and friendly online learning community to work on carefully selected tasks at their own pace. There will also be a plenty of opportunities to ask questions and to receive guidance and feedback.

Type: Online (using Zoom and Slack software)

Event period: End of November 2020 to March 2021

Applicant Criteria: Teachers of Japanese who are currently employed by an educational institution in the United Kingdom or Europe. (We will prioritise applications from teachers working in secondary education in the United Kingdom)

Participation Requirements: Participants must have no issues with online learning and be able to participate actively in topic discussions, as well as granting permission for the Japan Foundation, London to use images, recordings, surveys, interviews etc for activity reports, evaluations, and future publicity.

Course Language: The course will mainly be conducted in Japanese, but there will be English language support when necessary.

Number of Participants: 15

How to Apply: Please fill out the online form below.

https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/P0Z0E5/

Application Deadline: 16th November (Monday) 9:00AM (GMT)

Note: This course is designed to take place with a small number of participants. The Japan Foundation, London will evaluate applications to decide on who will participate. Please understand that we cannot answer questions regarding success or failure of application.

Please click here to download the Guidelines for Applicants

Schedule (planned):

-      16th November 2020 (Monday) – Application deadline

-      20th November 2020 (Friday) – Notification of application results

-      28th November 2020 (Saturday) – Course orientation

-      December 2020 – Distribution of Lecture Video 1

-      January 2021 – Distribution of Lecture Video 2

-      February 2021 – Distribution of Lecture Video 3

-      March 2021 – Reflection and evaluations

 

Instructor: Dr. Tomohisa Yamada

Associate Professor at Hokkaido University (Institute for the Advancement of Higher Education/ Graduate School of International Media-Communication and Tourism Studies)

Dr Yamada has an MA from the Institute of Education, University of London, and Ph.D. in Education  from Hokkaido University. After working with the University of London School of Oriental and African Studies Language Centre and Saga University Exchange Student Centre, he assumed his present post in 2012. His area of research is educational technology and teacher education. As well as his research activities, he is actively involved in giving lectures and professional development programmes aimed at increasing ICT literacy for teachers of Japanese. He was awarded the Hokkaido University Excellent Teachers award (2014 to 2019). Among his key publications are “Practical Use of ICT (Second Edition)” and “Active Learning for Teachers of Japanese” (Kuroshio Shuppan).

Message from the Instructor:

In 2020, due to Covid-19, our lives and our classroom classes have become limited, and we have been forced to move online. Teachers are now urgently required to be able to use ICT. Not only focusing on improving the efficiency of administration and teaching results, but also looking ahead to the future of education, this online course will be formed of the following three perspectives:

  1. Making and Organising: A lesson on the efficacy of the creation of teaching materials, managing student grades and data management.
  2. Presentation: A lesson on what ICT literacy is necessary to present teaching materials to learners.
  3. Linking: A lesson on how to create a space outside of the classroom for teachers and learners to make connections, and how to use that space effectively.

We aim to have participants in this course learn these points together, and for the participants a learning community which promote/value collaborative collegiality. I hope that through this network, the amount of colleagues to whom you can express your “how do I do this?” will increase, and this network that will begin in the United Kingdom will spread to Europe.

 

Course Coordinator: Yuko Fujimitsu (The Japan Foundation, London – Japanese Language Chief Advisor)


Date: 16 November 2020
Venue:

Online.

Back to Top

[Online Talk] Designs That Defined Modern Japan   org

 

The decades leading up to the turn of the 21st century have seen in Japan an unprecedented amount of growth and development, with the nation spearheading the way in pioneering technologies, art, and designs. While some cross-referenced existing global design movements, Japanese creators have focused on the needs and preferences of their society, creating many ground-breaking products with new conceptions that revolutionised not only the fields of design in Japan, but also provided key inspiration for future designs in the Western world. From fashion to ceramics, transportation devices to objects used in the daily lives of the average person, Japan offered new directions to explore original ideas.

But are there any tangible items in particular which can be said to stand out as the game changers in the history of Japanese design? To answer this question, we invite Professor KASHIWAGI Hiroshi, a prominent design historian and critic, who will draw on his long-standing career in the field to give his view as to the objects which deserve such an esteemed title. After introducing and providing a socio-historical background on his selection of objects, he will delve into where he believes the future of Japanese design is heading. Following KASHIWAGI's presentation, there will be a short discussion with Josephine Rout, Curator at the Victoria and Albert Museum

 

About the speakers

KASHIWAGI Hiroshi is a Professor Emeritus at Musashino Art University, Tokyo. Majored in History of Modern Design. He is a design critic and an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Art, London. Born in Kobe in 1946. Graduated with a design degree from Musashino Art University. He has been attempting to spell out modern thought aesthetic through his research in design. Selected Exhibitions: Curator for the exhibition; Tanaka Ikko Retrospective Exhibition, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, 2003. Curator for the exhibition; Fantaisies Cybernetiques, Maison de la culture du Japon a Paris, 2003-4. Selected Publication: Modan dezain hihan (Critique of the modern design) Iwanami Syoten, Tokyo, 02. “Shikiri” no Bunkaron (Cultural studies on “boundary”) Kodansya, Tokyo. 04. Tantei-syosetu no shitunai (Interior of Detective Story) Hakusuisya, Tokyo, 11. Dezain no Kyokasyo (The Textbook on Design) Kodansya, Tokyo, 11. Kaji no seijigaku (Studies on Domestic Science) Iwanami Syoten, Tokyo, 15. Shikaku no Seimeiryoku (The Life Force of Visual Culture) Iwanami Syoten, Tokyo. 17.

Josephine Rout is a Curator at the Victoria and Albert Museum where she looks after the Japanese collections of Meiji, Modern and Contemporary Fashion, Design and Metalwork. She is a graduate of the University of Canterbury, Aotearoa, New Zealand, and the Royal College of Art, London. At the V&A, she was Assistant Curator for the Toshiba Gallery of Japanese Art refurbishment, curated the Friday Late Neo Nipponica and was Project Curator of the exhibition Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk. Her first book, Japanese Dress in Detail (2020), is shortlisted for the 2021 Association of Dress Historians Book of the Year Award.

 

The Japan Foundation Game Changer Series: The World is Changing; What Changed Japan

 

Please note that this will be an Online Event held on Zoom.

 

This online event is free to attend but places are limited and registration is essential. To reserve your space, please book your ticket here.

 


Date: 23 June 2021 from 1.00pm

For more information, please click here.

Back to Top

All You May Want to Know About Shojo Manga
A Lecture by Tomoko Yamada
  org

Though it might not be widely recognised in the UK, shojo manga (girls’ manga) is an established genre within the Japanese manga world, for many decades having been primarily targeted at a female readership demographic. Constantly evolving in its narrative structures as well as the pictorial expression, it has inspired girls and young women through comic media suitable for different stages of their lives. Reflecting the demands of Japanese contemporary society, it often acts as a companion guide on which its readers can model their life styles.

So what is shojo manga and what actually defines the genre?

The Japan Foundation is delighted to welcome manga curator, critic, and shojo manga researcher at Meiji University, Tomoko Yamada, who will take you on a journey through the world of shojo manga with her insightful and informative illustrated talk. Having written extensively on the effects of the genre on visual pop culture, and interviewed many shojo manga artists including Keiko Takemiya, Yamada will delineate the origin of shojo manga as well as the characteristics and development of this unique narrative art with fresh perspective. Yamada will also elucidate how the readers have interacted with one another during the development of the genre throughout the years, while pointing out some of the pivotal moments in the history of shojo manga.

This talk will map out Japan’s arguably lesser known yet certainly one of the most expansive manga genres, as well as offer the opportunity to discover more about who’s who in shojo manga, complementing the City: Manga exhibition at the British Museum.


Date: 24 August 2019 from 2.30pm
Venue:

The Swedenborg Society | Swedenborg Hall | 20-21 Bloomsbury Way | London WC1A 2TH


For more information, please click here.

In Partnership with:

And Celebrating:

Back to Top

Seikatsu Kogei: Objects For Intentional Living Exhibition Organised by The Japan Foundation, Sydney   org

Organised by The Japan Foundation, Sydney, Seikatsu Kogei: Objects for Intentional Living explores the Japanese craft movement that began in the 1990s known as Seikatsu Kogei, or lifestyle crafts. See how the works of Seikatsu Kogei artists re-examine our relationship to the objects in our lives, presented together in Australia for the first time.

Included in this exhibition are some 50 works by 22 currently-active Seikatsu Kogei artists. The objects on display are made from a variety of materials, including wood, ceramics, lacquer, glass, metal, bamboo, paper and clay.

Due to the unexpected closure of The Japan Foundation Sydney gallery as a result of COVID-19, the Seikatsu Kogei: Objects for Intentional Living exhibition is now available to view online. We invite you to enjoy the exhibition virtually by clicking here.

Please note that the end date of the exhibition may be subject to change.


Date: 21 February 2020 - 31 July 2020
Back to Top

Carving Out Beauty - The Life and Work of Munakata Shiko   org

 

"Like the vastness of space, like a universe unlimited, untold, unattainable, and inscrutable- that is the woodcut."

– Shiko Munakata.
(Munakata: the “Way” of the Woodcut, Brooklyn, Pratt Adlib Press, 1961)

 

Best known for his earlier phase of black and white woodblock prints, MUNAKATA Shiko (1903-1975) is one of the greatest Japanese artists of the 20th century. His works are instantly recognisable by the expressive urgency with which he worked to bring out the vitality that is characteristic of his art. A self-taught artist, he continued to be inspired by the love of nature and folk traditions of his native Aomori. Perhaps the most indicative element of his work has been the Buddhist imagery created in Toyama (after the 1945 bombing of Tokyo forced him to escape the capital), which heavily featured in his prints and earned him a number of accolades from esteemed temples of Japan. He made his mark on an international scale, too, receiving first prize in exhibitions held in Lugano (1952), Sao Paulo (1955), Venice (1956), and Hayward Gallery in London (1991), as part of an exhibition which subsequently toured in the UK.

Ensuring the legacy of his name lives on in present day, independent curator and researcher, ISHII Yoriko, has been a key figure in lectures and publications aimed at revealing a hidden side of the folk art master. As MUNAKATA’s granddaughter, she is arguably best equipped to do so.

Commemorating the 45th anniversary of MUNAKATA’s death, The Japan Foundation is delighted to welcome her as she delivers an insightful online talk about the life and work of the artist, drawing on personal memories of him to paint a picture of the man behind the woodblock prints. Elaborating on the philosophy and techniques used by MUNAKATA in his work, as well as the different stages of this career as an artist, ISHII will explain the significance his prints continue to have – both in Japan and globally – and what is being done to preserve his memory.

After her presentation, ISHII will have a brief conversation with artist, educator and author, Elspeth Lamb.

 

About the speakers

ISHII Yoriko

Born in Tokyo in 1956, she is the granddaughter of MUNAKATA Shiko. After graduating from university, she began working as a curator at the Munakata Museum of Art (closed in 2011) in Kamakura City. In recent years, through exhibition supervision, writing, lectures, and similar activities, she has worked to convey the lesser known attributes of her grandfather. ISHII is also currently a special researcher at Nanto Shiritsu Fukumitsu Museum.

 

Elspeth Lamb

Elspeth Lamb is an artist, educator and author. Her book ‘Papermaking for Printmakers’ was published by A&C Black London in 2006 and sells worldwide. She has exhibited in New York, London, Tokyo, Kyoto and Toronto and she has been artist in residence in Japan several times since 2000 ,studying and researching with hanga masters and more recently with a Unesco Hosokawa-shi papermaking master in Ogawa, Japan.

 

This talk has been made possible with the kind assistance of Kayoko Tezuka, Tuning for the Future (TFF) in Japan.

http://www.npo-tff.org 

 

Image credit: In Praise of Flower Hunting, 1954 /「華狩頌(はなかりしょう)1954」, Shiko Munakata

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.


Date: 20 October 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

Postgraduate Workshop 2021   org

The Japan Foundation/BAJS Postgraduate Workshop is back! A lot has changed since the 2020 iteration, and this year’s online workshop will be tackling the effects of the global pandemic on academia head on. The workshop will take place online and will be spread over two mornings. The aim of this workshop will be to help postgraduate students develop their careers in JS navigating the 'new normal'.

 This year, participating students will also be able to present their latest research to academics and their peers, gaining important feedback at a time when presenting opportunities is low.

There will also be talks and discussions about key areas surrounding the rapidly changing world of Japanese Studies. Topics will include:

  • Funding opportunities available to PhD candidates and early career researchers.
  • The current state of academia in Japan and the effects of COVID-19
  • Job opportunities both inside and outside of academia 
  • Creating a social media research presence
  • And more…

Eligibility

Registration is open to postgraduate in any field of the humanities of social sciences with a focus on Japan (including comparative studies). Spaces are limited and priority will be given to PhD/Dphil students from the UK/Ireland. Master’s level students may apply at any time but their places will not be confirmed until closer to the event. Students must be able to attend both days.

Registration is free for all participants. To register, please fill in this form.


Date: 25 February 2021 - 26 February 2021
Venue:

Online

Back to Top

Naomi Kawase: In Focus
at the Open City Documentary Festival
  org

 

The Japan Foundation is proud to partner with Open City Documentary Festival on screenings of a selection of works by critically-acclaimed Japanese director, Naomi Kawase.

The director herself will be in attendance.

1:30pm - Embracing + Sky, Wind, Fire, Water, Earth + Q&A

In these two deeply personal films, Naomi Kawase reflects on her relationship with her father, absent throughout her childhood. Embracing (1992) revolves around Naomi’s search for her father despite her adoptive mother’s discouragement and her own doubts about what she might find. Combining nostalgic home movies and handheld Super 8mm footage of nature, Kawase weaves together an achingly beautiful search for identity and the true meaning of family. Sky, Wind, Fire, Water, Earth (2001) chronicles Naomi’s reaction to her father’s death a decade later, drawing lifelong connections between her original search, her childhood with her adoptive parents and her unfulfilled longing for a relationship with her birth parents.

Followed by a Q&A with director Naomi Kawase

 

4:00pm - Katatsumori + See Heaven + Chiri + Intro 

This triptych of moving tributes from Naomi Kawase creates an affectionate portrait of her bond with her great-aunt who adopted and raised her. Capturing her lovingly with close up Super 8mm photography, Katatsumori (1994) introduces us to Uno Kawase as she enters her eighties. A recurrent figure in all of Kawase’s personal documentaries, Uno remains kind, good-humoured and devoted to her adoptive daughter, and See Heaven (1995) offers an intimate, experimental collage of images dedicated to the playful but tender relationship between the two. In Chiri (2012), we witness Uno’s daily routine as she nears her final days and Kawase grapples with coming to terms with her great-aunt’s passing.

Director Naomi Kawase will be present to introduce the screening.

 

Monday, 9 September at Curzon Soho Cinema

6:30pm - Birth/Mother + Extended Conversation 

About to give birth to her own child, Naomi Kawase turns her camera back on to her adoptive mother and great-aunt in this riveting examination of family, motherhood and the female body. An intensely intimate and candid film, Birth/Mother (2006) captures images of her great-aunt’s ageing body while Kawase reflects on her own journey to becoming a mother. The film offers a more complex portrayal of the relationship between the two women than Kawase’s earlier shorts, but the connection between them remains undeniable.

Naomi Kawase will join us after the screening of the film for an extended in-conversation event


Date: 8 September 2019 - 9 September 2019
Venue:

The Regent Street Cinema, 307 Regent St, London W1B 2HW

and 

Curzon Soho Cinema, 99 Shaftesbury Ave, Soho, London W1D 5DY


For more information, please click here.

Presented by:

Celebrating:

 

Back to Top

UK-JAPAN Bridge Together Project   org

   

UK-JAPAN Bridge Together Project: Sakubei Yamamoto Coal Mining Paintings World Tour

As part of the Beyond 2020 programme, the Bridge Together Project is exhibiting the coal mining paintings of Sakubei Yamamoto which have been registered as a UNESCO Memory of the World – the first Japanese artefacts to receive the honour. The exhibition will tour cities around the world in the lead up to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympic Games.

 

Date: 4 October – 15 November 2019

Venue: Embassy of Japan, 101-104 Piccadilly, Mayfair, London W1J 7JT

 

Date: 14 September 2019 – 30 September 2020

Venue: Big Pit National Coal Museum, Pontypool NP4 9XP, Wales

Sakubei Yamamoto Coal Mining Paintings World Tour


Date: 4 October 2019 - 30 September 2020

For more information, please click here.

Celebrating:

 

Back to Top

Nihongo Cup 2020 - Finals Day   org

The UK’s talented young students of Japanese language will be competing at the Finals Day of the Nihongo Cup – the Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary Schools.

Students from all levels of Secondary education – Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5 – will showcase their amazing talent and hard work in their Japanese language studies while competing for some fantastic prizes.

Due to the current situation with Covid-19, the Finals Day will take place as an online event this year. We will be posting more details shortly, so please check back here for updates.

Please be aware that this event is closed to the public. Spectators will be limited to finalists, their families and their teachers, as well as Nihongo Cup organisers, sponsors and so on.

To read our report about last year’s finals day, click here.

Download the programme for Finals Day by clicking here!


Date: 27 June 2020 from 12.30pm
Venue:

Online event.


The Nihongo Cup is co-organised by the Japanese Language Committee of the Association for Language Learning (ALL) and the Japan Foundation London.

Back to Top

Author Talk with Kanako Nishi   org

 

Since her debut in 2004 with a collection of short stories Blue (Aoi), Kanako Nishi’s star has risen rapidly in the Japanese literary world. Born in Tehran, and raised in Cairo and Osaka, Nishi has been praised by critics for her unorthodox style and the use of language in her books which are often written using the distinctive Kansai dialect. The praise has also materialised into awards she has garnered, among them the Oda Sakunosuke Prize in 2006, the Kawai Hayao Literary Prize in 2012, and the prestigious Naoki Prize in 2015 for her novel Saraba! (2014). Notably, she is also an accomplished author of children’s books with one of her representative works, Entaku (Entaku: Kokko Hitonatsu no Imagine, 2011), having been adapted into film by Isao Yukisada in 2014. Her other novels have inspired many filmmakers as well as enthusiastic readers from different generations.

In conjunction with her much anticipated appearance at this year's Times and Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival, Nishi, in conversation with literary translator Polly Barton, will talk about her work aimed at both adult and younger readerships, reflecting on the inspiration behind her stories and her writing style, including how she draws on her own international upbringing to shape her narratives. They will also discuss some of the major themes explored in Nishi’s novels such as individualism, society, power, and what the author wishes to express through her literature.

Though many of Nishi’s books are yet to be translated, this talk will provide a first insight into the creative process of one of Japan’s best-loved novelists, whose debut on a global stage has been eagerly anticipated.

A small selection of Nishi’s works translated into English:

Merry Christmas, English trans. Allison Markin Powell, fiftystorms.org https://fiftystorms.org/merry-christmas-by-kanako-nishi

Burn, English trans. Allison Markin Powell, Freeman's: Power, Fall 2018 issue https://www.amazon.com/dp/0802128203

This event is free to attend, but booking is essential. To book via Eventbrite, please click here.


このイベントは無料ですが、事前予約が必要です。お申し込みはこちらからお願いいたします。


Date: 11 October 2019 from 6.30pm
Venue:

Royal Society of Arts (RSA), Durham Auditorium, Durham House Street — off The Strand, London WC2N 6HG


This event is organised in partnership with The Times and The Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival. Nishi will be appearing at the Cheltenham Literature Festival on Saturday, 12 October in the morning and afternoon. For more information about the Festival, please visit their website here.


 

Celebrating:

     

Back to Top

The Japan Foundation Touring Exhibition:
The Superlative Artistry of Japan
  org

 

This exhibition captures Japan’s creative culture and monozukuri spirit through the theme of “superlative artistry,” which refers to the exceptional methods and techniques used. Starting with the craft works from the Meiji era, the exhibition features 38 items across a wide range of genres, including contemporary art, craft works, food samples, and shokugan (small toys sold with candy).  

This is the only chance to see this popular exhibition in the UK, don't miss it!

Update: The official exhibition catalogue is now available for viewing online completely free of charge. Simply click on the PDF icon below and enjoy the exhibition from home!


Date: 18 January 2020 - 19 April 2020
Venue:

Salford Museum and Art Gallery, Crescent, Salford M5 4WU

Download Exhibition Catalogue

Celebrating:

   

Back to Top

Game + Culture: Co-evolution of Japanese Video Games and Society   org

 

From the likes of the Super Mario series to the more recent Animal Crossing and e-sports, Japanese video games have been widely acknowledged as some of the best in business, attracting evangelical fans all over the world. Though ostensibly created with borderless content and universal characters, it is argued by some that Japanese video games are deeply embedded in and reflective of Japanese society. Their palpable spirit and philosophies may be understood as being sourced from Japan’s old traditions, even from well-known art forms such as haiku and the practice of tea ceremony. However, it is difficult to perceive at a glance how these seemingly unrelated pretechnological art forms and culture have influenced 21st century digital content.

Inviting HIRABAYASHI Hisakazu, a video game journalist and analyst, this special talk aims to identify ‘Japaneseness’ in digital game content, analysing to what degree it has rooted from Japanese cultural as well as social history and to what extent it is indebted to old Japanese traditions. While illustrating some characteristics of leading game companies such as Nintendo, HIRABAYASHI also explains the future visions of these companies and game creators against a background of the recent evidence of a decline in the global share of Japanese games. 

A brief conversation with Culture Director of the BGI, Iain Simons, will follow HIRABAYASHI’s lecture.

 

About the speakers

HIRABAYASHI Hisakazu (Interact Co., Ltd. CEO / Game analyst) In 1985, after graduating from Aoyama Gakuin University, he joined the publishing company Takarajima where he worked as editor of a game specialty magazine. In 1991, he established Interact Co., Ltd., a consulting company specializing in the game industry, and started supporting companies entering the game industry. He currently works as a consultant of the game industry, a journalist, and a commentator on television and radio programs. HIRABAYASHI’s works include the book Gemū no daigaku (The University of Gaming) and Gemū no jiji mondai (Current Issues in Gaming). He is an editorial board member of Digital content white paper of Japan, as well as a board member of the Japan Game Culture Foundation.

Iain Simons makes, writes and talks about videogames and culture across many popular and specialist media. He has written numerous books and papers and regularly contributes to conferences and events around the world. In 2005 he curated the first videogame festival at London’s SouthBank Centre, after which he founded GameCity in 2006. In 2008, this project led to co-founding the first National Videogame Archive, with the National Media Museum. In 2015 he co-founded the National Videogame Arcade, the acclaimed cultural centre for games, which following a merger with the BGI relaunched as the National Videogame Museum. He has worked as a creative consultant with many organisations including the BBC, ArtsDepot, British Film Institute, Barbican Centre, NHS and sits on the heritage advisory board of BAFTA.

Image credit: Partial photo of retro Nintendo games by Nick Hamze on Unsplash

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please click here.


Date: 12 November 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

Nihongo Cup 2021 - Applications Open!   org

Nihongo Cup is the Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary School students across three categories: Key Stage 3, Pre-GCSE Key Stage 4 and 5, and Post GCSE Key Stage 4 and 5.

Finalists will be invited to perform their speeches as part of an online Finals Day. Their speeches will be watched by a panel of judges and VIPs from the field of Japanese language education and Japan-UK relations. They will also have a chance to win some fantastic prizes!

Finals day will take place on 10th July 2021 (Saturday). 

You can also find articles about previous Nihongo Cup finals on our News Page.

To find out more and to download application forms, please download the "Application Pack" zip file at the bottom of this event listing.

The Application Pack contains an application form, information and rules and a flier/poster.

Please read the information carefully before applying.

The closing date for applications is: 23rd April 2021 (extended!)


Date: 16 December 2020 - 23 April 2021
Download Nihongo Cup Application Pack 26-02

Nihongo Cup is organised by the Association for Language Learning (ALL) and the Japan Foundation London.

Back to Top

[Online Talk] Art In Motion - Creatives Who Have Transitioned to Video Artistry   org

 

Since its emergence in the late 1960s, video artistry has been gaining an increasingly prominent position in the visual arts sphere, forming a key element in many independent and large-scale exhibitions worldwide. Setting itself apart from conventional filmmaking, its unique way of conveying a particular vision or message has been adopted by many artists, including those who do not necessarily begin their career with motion image.

So, what is the attraction of video art from the artists’ perspective? Is it easier to create in its infinite variety and in the current times which heavily rely on digital alternatives? Perhaps it provides a greater medium for expression?

In conjunction with the Japan Foundation’s online exhibition, 11 Stories on Distanced Relationships - Contemporary Art from Japan (which ran 30 March - 5 May 2021), we have invited three of the exhibited artists,  who are either based in or closely connected to the UK, and who began their careers with other media of expression but later adopted moving image.

The three artists are NOGUCHI Rika whose main medium is photography but who recently started incorporating video art, YANAI Shino who produces performances and installations mostly in video, and SAWA Hiraki who studied sculpture but is known for his videos which capture his subject’s full psychological territory. Together they will talk us through their individual relationships with video art and what inspired them to select this medium in their conceptualisations, while introducing some of their representative works. The conversation will be led by Stuart Tulloch, curator and Head of Programme at Firstsite.

 

About the speakers

Stuart Tulloch is Head of Programme at Firstsite, Colchester (www.firstsite.uk). Previously Curator at Ikon Gallery, Birmingham (2012 – 2014) and Curator Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool (2003 – 2012). Between 1999 – 2003, Stuart was an Assistant Exhibition Organiser at Hayward Gallery, London.  At Hayward he was part of the team that organised the major exhibition of contemporary Japanese art entitled Facts of Life, in 2001. He has since led solo exhibition presentations and projects by Shimabuku (Ikon, 2013) and Makoto Nomura (Grundy, 2004). He is currently leading a mayor project of new work by celebrated artist Michael Landy for Firstsite opening June 2021 - Welcome to Essex.

NOGUCHI Rika, born in 1971, lives and works in Okinawa Prefecture. NOGUCHI has been using the media of the photograph as a means to visualize “What is there, but invisible.” Recently she has also been working on video art focusing on subjects such as insects and plants. Major recent solo exhibitions include At the Bottom of the Sea (Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo, 2017) and To the Night Planet (Loock Gallery, Berlin, 2016). Group exhibitions include Twinkling Skin, Emission of Light by Life and Death (Ashikaga Museum of Art, Tochigi, 2020), and 21st Sydney Biennale SUPERPOSITION: Art of Equilibrium and Engagement (Sydney, Australia, 2018).

YANAI Shino lives and works in London. YANAI has produced performances and installations mostly in video and sound that explore through fieldwork the brutality inherent in beauty and socially or historically disguised violence. Recently, she has been interested in pathways and relics. Major recent solo exhibitions include The Deep End (Sagacho Archives, Tokyo, 2019) and Blue Passages (White Conduit Projects, London, 2016). Group exhibitions include 'de-sport: The Deconstruction and Reconstruction of Sports through Art (21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, 2020) and What We See (The National Museum of Art, Osaka, 2013).

SAWA Hiraki is based in London and the Ishikawa Prefecture. SAWA creates videos that capture his subject’s full psychological territory, including mental landscapes and memories. In recent years, he has worked on installations that combine an axis of video with three- and two-dimensional works. Major exhibitions include Overlapping Circles: 5 Artists Collaborate with the Collection (Kawamura Memorial DIC Museum of Art, Chiba, 2020), KAAT Exhibition 2018: Hiraki Sawa (solo exhibition–Kanagawa Arts Theatre, Kanagawa, 2018), Under the Box, Beyond the Bounds (solo exhibition–Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery, Tokyo, 2014) and the 17th Sydney Biennale (Sydney, Australia, 2010).

 

Please note that this will be an Online Event held on Zoom.

 

This online event is free to attend but places are limited and registration is essential. To reserve your space, please book your ticket here: 

https://bit.ly/3dFBoKb


Date: 25 May 2021 from 1.00pm

For more information, please click here.

Back to Top

A Reading Performance of Pearl and Dagger at The Other Palace   org

 

The Japan Foundation is proud to partner with Thèatre Lapis on this special reading performance.

Pearl and Dagger is a new musical inspired by the Japanese folktale, A Story of Oki Island, which can originally be found in Ancient Tales and Folklore of Japan, written in 1906 by Richard Gordon Smith, a British naturalist.

It is the story of Tokoyo, a young woman dealing with the grief over her deceased mother. When her father, the former samurai Oribe, is wrongly imprisoned on a mysterious island, she sets out on a journey to find him and must discover the secrets of the island, her family, and the meaning of real bravery.

Originally conceived by composer/lyricist Eden Tredwell, directed by Yojiro Ichikawa and co-written by Nozomi Abe, this is the first trial show of the unique production devised from the collaboration between British and Japanese artists, combining both Western musical theatre and Japanese tradition. As part of Thèatre Lapis five-year project ‘Brilliance 2016-2020’, which retells Japanese stories in unique theatre setting, the team behind this production aims to raise and increase awareness of Japan and Japanese culture, as well as hopes that this theatrical experience becomes an invitation to the world of Japanese aesthetics.

Thèatre Lapis is planning to expand this production and tour it to various locations in the UK towards 2020.


Date: 29 November 2019 from 2.00pm
Venue:

The Other Palace, Studio, 12 Palace Street, London SW1E 5JA


For more information, please click here.

Presented by:

 

Celebrating:

 

Back to Top

[Online Talk] The Pursuit for New Aesthetics - An Architectural Talk with HIRANO Toshiki   org

 

HIRANO Toshiki is an architectural designer based in Tokyo, Japan. Having studied under the globally acclaimed architect TAKAMATSU Shin, his talent began to be recognised abroad when he was awarded the Suzanne Kolarik Underwood Prize upon receiving his Master of Architecture degree from Princeton University in 2012. HIRANO aims to lend his distinct style to landmarks on an international scale as, in addition to his design work in Japan, he has been a pivotal creative voice involved in project proposals and design competitions such as for the Abu Dhabi Flamingo Visitor Center and the Aalto Museum Extension in Jyvaskyla, Finland. His work is frequently featured in public exhibitions such as his Malformed Objects at the Yamamoto Gendai, Tokyo in 2017. He teaches at the University of Tokyo and currently serves as a co-director of SEKISUI HOUSE - KUMA LAB by KUMA Kengo.

Ahead of the London Design Biennale 2021 in June, in which HIRANO will be representing Japan with his latest installation project Reinventing Texture supported by the Japan Foundation, we are proud to welcome him at an online talk event where he will discuss his defining projects including the work he will be presenting at the Biennale. HIRANO will also explore what he considers to be the new architectural aesthetic, as well as how his creative philosophy has and does determine his architectural activities. His presentation will be followed by fellow architect and co-founder of Pareid, Déborah Lopez, and will be moderated by Sarah Mineko Ichioka, director of Desire Lines (Singapore).

 

About the guest speakers

HIRANO Toshiki is an architectural designer based in Tokyo, Japan. He teaches at the University of Tokyo and currently serves as a co-director of SEKISUI HOUSE - KUMA LAB. His research and work investigate the new aesthetics in architecture drawing inspirations from digital technology, art and philosophy. His latest installation project "Reinventing Texture”, curated by Clare Farrow Studio, will be exhibited at Somerset House for the London Design Biennale 2021.

Website: toshiki-hirano.com

 

Sarah Mineko Ichioka, Hon FRIBA, leads Desire Lines, a strategic consultancy for environmental, cultural and social-impact organisations and initiatives. She has been recognised as a World Cities Summit Young Leader, one of the Global Public Interest Design 100, and a British Council / Clore Foundation Cultural Leadership International Fellow. She has advised initiatives including the European Prize for Urban Public Space, Aga Khan Award for Architecture, and Milan Triennale. Ichioka is a co-curator of the Singapore Pavilion at the 2021 Venice Biennale of Architecture, and co-author, with Michael Pawlyn, of 'Flourish: Design Paradigms for Our Planetary Emergency' (forthcoming 2021).

Déborah Lopez is a licensed architect in Spain and co-founder of Pareid; an interdisciplinary design and research studio currently located in London. Her work adopts approaches from various fields and contexts, addressing topics related to climate, ecology, human perception, machine sentience, and their capacity for altering current modes of existence through imminent fictions (if). Currently, she is a Lecturer (Teaching) at the Bartlett, UCL in London where she co-leads Research Cluster 1 and 20  under the title of ‘Monumental Wastelands’. She has been recently awarded the Arquia Innova Award by Fundación Arquia and her work has been featured in different international institutions and exhibitions such as the Royal Academy of Arts, Centre Pompidou, the Seoul Biennale and the Venice Biennale.

 

Reinventing Texture by Toshiki Hirano in collaboration with MA Interior Design at the Royal College of Art and MSCTY Studio.

Curated by Clare Farrow, Interdisciplinary Curator and Writer, Clare Farrow Studio.

Sponsored by KP Acoustics and supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, by the Japan Foundation and by Arts Council Tokyo.

The Biennale will run from 1-27 June and can be experienced in person and also digitally through the London Design Biennale website.

 

Please note that this will be an Online Event held on Zoom.

 

This online event is free to attend but places are limited and registration is essential. To reserve your space, please book your ticket here

 


Date: 3 June 2021 from 1.00pm

For more information, please click here.

         

Back to Top

Yonkoma manga: A workshop led by Shango   org

How have you been managing your life under the lockdown? Would you like to learn how to express and share a slice of your life in a manga panel? Follow as author and manga artist Shango gives you tips on drawing yonkoma manga online!

Yonkoma manga is a Japanese comic strip format which utilises four panels generally of equal size to tell a brief story or illustrate a scene – often with humorous undertones. Originating in early 20th century Japan, the format has proliferated in many other Asian countries, and indeed the West, since.

This workshop is open to all abilities and you do not have to have any prior knowledge of manga drawing, or yonkoma manga. Whether you just want to spend an hour creatively and ease any stresses, or are an aspiring illustrator, the pace will be right for everyone.

Following the workshop, participants are welcome to share their creations with us at Japan Foundation, as well as with Shango, by tagging our social media accounts or using the hashtag #YonkomaChallenge.

Author/Artist Shangomola Edunjobi began his comics career in 2014 when his One Page Comic ‘Scarlet’ took first prize in the London Graphic Novel Network A3 comic competition 2014. Since then he has won a series of awards and also contributed to the 2019 Citi MANGA exhibition at the British Museum as its Curator of tone. He will start the session by introducing his work, explaining his methods and motivations, such as the passion for creating ethnic diversity in comics. Then, he will take the participants through a step by step tutorial, teaching you structure, technique, and style so that you can add your individual story to the project.


Date: 29 May 2020 from 12.00pm
Venue:

Online Zoom Seminar


For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

[Online Event] Delving Into ' Grave of the Fireflies' with Alex Dudok de Wit   org

 

It is probably not an overstatement to say that many view the films produced by Studio Ghibli to be the gateway for the Japanese animation craze gaining traction across the globe. Easily accessible in foreign countries and boasting universally engaging and uplifting storylines, works like Spirited Away or My Neighbour Totoro directed by Hayao MIYAZAKI have become household names worldwide. However, the contributions of the other creative giant for Studio Ghibli, Isao TAKAHATA, have sometimes slipped under the radar; in particular those works with storylines which cannot necessarily be classed as fantasy or family friendly. One such film is Grave of the Fireflies, directed by TAKAHATA and based on an autobiographical story by NOSAKA Akiyuki. The film follows two Japanese children orphaned by a catastrophic air raid in Kobe, portraying their struggle to survive the last days of the Second World War with an unflinching realism rarely seen in animation. But why has this film been left out of the frenzied consumption of Studio Ghibli’s works?

In conjunction with the release of the first book-length study of the film in English, Grave of the Fireflies (BFI Film Classics) in May, we invite the author, Alex Dudok de Wit, a journalist with expertise on Japanese anime, to explore his findings and the significance of this title. With critical analysis contextualised by the film’s production background, he will focus on Isao TAKAHATA’s contribution to the animation genre, moving away from the more common spotlight on Hayao MIYAZAKI’s work. His presentation, which will include live reading of short passages from the book, will be followed by a conversation with Dr YOSHIOKA Shiro, lecturer in Japanese Studies at Newcastle University, who specialises in MIYAZAKI and Studio Ghibli’s animation.

 

‘Grave of the Fireflies’ by Alex Dudok de Wit will be published by Bloomsbury on 6 May (ISBN 9781838719241) as part of the BFI Film Classics series. 

 

We are pleased to share an exclusive discount code for our subscribers and event attendees which can be applied when purchasing your own copy from bloomsbury.com

To take advantage of this offer, please visit the official purchase site here, and enter code ‘GOTFJF’ at check out for 25% off and free shipping. Expires 25 June 2021.

Please note that any transactions carried out on bloomsbury.com fall under the merchant’s responsibility and any questions or issues related to a purchase should be directed to them.

 

About the guest speakers

Alex Dudok de Wit is a journalist who writes chiefly about the art and business of animation. He is the Associate Editor at Cartoon Brew, the most widely read animation news site, and an animation correspondent for Sight & Sound, the magazine of the British Film Institute. His writing has also appeared on the BBC and in Vulture, Little White Lies, The Telegraph, The i, The Independent, Time Out, and Index on Censorship. His first book, Grave of the Fireflies (BFI Film Classics), was published by Bloomsbury on May 6.

YOSHIOKA Shiro is lecturer in Japanese Studies of Newcastle University. His main research interest is Japanese popular culture, especially anime. He has published articles and book chapters on Ghibli, Miyazaki and Takahata in English and Japanese, and is currently working on a monograph on Miyazaki, which overviews his life and career focusing on how he came to be seen as an auteur and quasi-intellectual. Besides Miyazaki and Ghibli, recently he is interested in how fans experience anime beyond the texts in various ways such as ‘pilgrimage’ to the locales.

 

 

Please note that this will be an Online Event held on Zoom.

 

This online event is free to attend but registration is essential.

To reserve your space, please book your ticket here.

 


Date: 26 May 2021 from 6.30pm

For more information, please click here.

Celebrating:

 

Ghibli Double Bill!

If you’re interested in this event, you might enjoy the below event

hosted by our New York office:

Exporting Studio Ghibli: The Road to Worldwide Recognition

Date: 27 May, 7:00pm (BST)

Online Zoom event. Book here.

Back to Top

March 2020 – BATJ and JF Spring Seminar: Using Drama as a Method of Education   org

The upcoming seminar "Using Drama as a Method of Education", based on the seminar in April 2019 “Participatory Approaches and Drama for Learning”, aims to further explore of the possibility of the drama method for Japanese Language Education. Inviting Professor Michiharu Miyazaki (Hirosaki University, Society for Acquisition-Oriented Learning Board Member) as a keynote speaker, this seminar will introduce the knowledge gained from the latest practical education research. We hope that the participants will be able to use the seminar as an opportunity to learn from exchanging ideas and conversing with each other.

Speaker: Professor Michiharu Miyazaki

Professor Miyazaki worked for 30 years as a teacher at the Toho Gakuen Elementary School and began work at Hirosaki University in April 2018. His specialities are drama education, education methods and teacher education. In 1995, he met Dr. Watanabe Jun at an invitation programme of the global education advocate Dr. David Selby. Professor Miyazaki has been an active member in the Society for Acquisition Oriented Learning since its foundation in 2006, taking a central role in the development of learning activities and has co-published many works on practical studies with Dr. Watanabe. He also writes scripts for children’s plays and is involved in staging them. Selected publications: Watanabe Jun, Society for Acquisition Oriented Learning. (2018) “Introduction to Participatory Activities” (Gakuji-shuppan); Watanabe Jun et al. (2019) “Methods of Education and Skill Theory” (Kobundo)

 

This seminar will take place entirely online, enabling participation from teachers all over the world.

 

Please note that this seminar will take place entirely in Japanese.

 

To find out more and to apply to attend, please go to the BATJ website by clicking this link.

 

Cost: £10 (BATJ members), £20 (non-BATJ members)


Date: 14 March 2020 from 9.00am - 4.30pm
Venue:

Online seminar


All times displayed are Greenwich Mean Time. Please be mindful of the time difference between GMT and your region.

Organised by:

 

In collaboraton with:

 

Back to Top

Applications for the Japanese Local Project Support Programme 2021-2022 are open!   org

Institutions can apply for up to £3000 for non-profit-making projects or activities which promote Japanese language education in the UK. Please check out our website for information on the type of projects we support, such as newly introducing Japanese into the curriculum or funding Japanese clubs.

 

We prioritise projects that fit into the following four categories:

 

1. Newly introducing Japanese into the curriculum

 

Up to £3,000 for projects that promote the introduction of Japanese into the curriculum (or onto the main school timetable) at primary and secondary schools. This grant covers staff costs and the cost of Japanese language books. Projects may take place online or offline.

 

2. Supporting GCSE or A-level courses

 

Up to £3,000 for projects that support GCSE or A-level courses. Particularly, if schools/organisations require support to ensure a large number of candidates are able to take formal qualifications in Japanese, they will be able to maintain their project by re-applying the following year. This means organisations will be able to apply for up to a total of £6,000 over two years. (Please note that we do not supplement the salary of teacher(s) already hired by the applying organisation.)  Covers staff costs and costs of Japanese language books. Projects may take place online or offline.

 

3. Japanese clubs

 

Up to £2,000 for organisations that newly introduce Japanese as an extracurricular activity or enrichment subject. In the case of schools, this is even if this is not within the school timetable. Covers staff cost, Japanese language book cost, origami cost and calligraphy cost. Clubs may take place online or offline.

 

4. Projects that enable links between primary/secondary institutions and institutions of higher education

 

Up to £3,000 for projects that strengthen connections between secondary institutions and institutions of higher education and create and/or strengthen networks among pupils, students, and teachers for the purpose of helping to promote Japanese language education in the UK. These projects can be aimed at both potential learners of Japanese and people who already are learning Japanese. This is a recently added category, so please contact us if you have any questions or would like to apply but are unsure as to whether your project is suitable. These projects may take place online or offline.

 

The application deadline for the 2021-22 programme is 28th May.

 

This year’s first funding deadline is 28th May – so please get your applications in by that date!

 

Download the following three documents by clicking on the “attachment” links at the end of this article:

 

-       - The General Information document.

 

-       -  The Application Form.

 

-        -  The Grant Flowchart

 


Date: 4 May 2021 - 28 May 2021
Download 2021-22 Flowchart
Download 2021-22 Application Form
Download 2021-22 General Information

We will also be holding a seminar on 14th May (Friday) providing application guidance. Find out more here: https://jpf.org.uk/whatson.php#1175 

Back to Top

Local Project Support Programme 2021-2022 Online Seminar and Q&A Session – Applications Open!   org

Are you considering applying for funding but aren’t sure about how to go about it? Do you have a project in mind but aren’t sure if it’s eligible? We would strongly recommend that you sign up to take part in our Online Seminar and Q&A session.

During this one-hour session, a member of our staff will talk participants through the application process, and then open the floor to questions and answers. We want to make sure the application process is as easy-to-understand as possible.

This session will be held twice on 14th May 2021 (Friday).

1. First Session: 13:00 to 14:00

2. Second Session: 18:00 to 19:00

We will be using Zoom software. Once you have applied we will send you information on how to join the session.

If you would like to take part, please sign up 12th May (Wednesday).

o   Apply for a place for Session 1 by filling out our Eventbrite Form here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/152709005747

o   Apply for a place for Session 2 by filling out our Eventbrite Form here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/152710070933

If you are unable to attend either session but are still interested in applying, please do not worry! We will be making a recording of the first part of the seminar (explanation of application process) and uploading it to our Youtube channel.

 


Date: 14 May 2021

You can find information on the programme as well as links to download an application form here: https://jpf.org.uk/whatson.php#1174

Back to Top

Ninja: Their Philosophies and Duties - A Talk by Prof Yuji Yamada   org

 

Telework Ninja – it’s the new term invented in response to the Covid 19 pandemic in Japan. The ‘ninja’ terminology is used here to, rather sarcastically, refer to those who have vanished from the working scene as the work from home system was introduced, but keep up the pretence of carrying out their job. This negative use of the term ‘ninja’ would likely not have been appreciated by those whose profession traditionally focused on the principle of keeping out of sight.

So, what were the true ninja’s secretive endeavours, roles and duties? What philosophy and mindset did they embrace in working as a ninja?

Based on his new research, leading expert in the field of ninja, Prof Yuji Yamada from Mie University in Japan, will explain the historical work done by real ninja while examining if any of their spirit and skills can be transferred to us in the modern age.

About Prof. Yuji Yamada

Prof. Yuji Yamada is a specialist in medieval Japanese cultural history and serves on the Faculty of Humanities, Law and Economics at Mie University, Japan. He earned his Ph.D. in history from Tsukuba University. His research focuses on the history of ‘vengeful spirits’, strange phenomena, Ise shrine, and ninja studies. His most recent publications include The Spirit of Ninja (2019).

Please note that this online event will be hosted on Zoom.


Date: 16 June 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

11 Stories on Distanced Relationships: Contemporary Art From Japan - An Online Exhibition   org

 

The Japan Foundation is pleased to present an online exhibition 11 Stories on Distanced Relationships: Contemporary Art from Japan as an endeavour to build a new framework for art exchange adapted to our reality with the coronavirus.

The spread of the pandemic has meant that since last year it has been difficult for people and goods to move around the globe, and as a result many international cultural exchange projects planned by the Foundation were cancelled. In this age of uncertainty, online forums have rapidly developed as places for communication, and everyone is having to reappraise their “distance” from their surrounds. This exhibition emerged from the question of how, in this context, we might go about building connections with the world. It is first ever exhibition of contemporary art to be held solely online by the Japan Foundation.

The exhibition introduces the work of 11 Japanese and Japan-based contemporary artists, centred on new pieces commissioned on the theme of “translating distance.” Psychological or physical distances have never been easy to reach across, or reduce. Nowadays distance has emerged as something we must learn to live with. This exhibition has been created to deliver works that earnestly address this kind of distance – from Japan to people everywhere in the world. We hope that everyone, wherever they may be, will enjoy it.

 

The Artists:

 

ARAKI Yu, HAN Ishu, IIYAMA Yuki, KOIZUMI Meiro, MOHRI Yuko, NOGUCHI Rika, OKUMURA Yuki, SATO Masaharu, SAWA Hiraki, YANAI Shino, YOSHIDA Shinya

 

For detailed information and to view the exhibition, please visit:

https://11stories.jpf.go.jp/en/ 


Date: 30 March 2021 - 5 May 2021

For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

Dartford Grammar School and Japan Foundation GCSE and IB Meeting   org

There will be a Japanese GCSE and IB Meeting at King’s College London on Friday 8th February 2019. This will be an opportunity for teachers teaching GCSE Japanese and/or IB Japanese to share and discuss schemes of work and resources; conduct moderation and share good practice in preparation for upcoming changes to the GCSE and IB syllabus.

The day will be divided with GCSE sessions taking place in the morning and IB sessions taking place in the afternoon.

  • Event: Dartford Grammar School and Japan Foundation GCSE and IB Meeting
  • Date: 8th February 2019 (Friday)
  • Schedule: 9:30 - 12:50 GCSE meeting, 13:30 - 16:30 IB meeting
  • Cost: Delegates will need to pay a contribution fee - Please refer to the booking form for details.
  • What to Bring on the Day: Delegates attending this event will need to bring a copy of:

- Their Scheme of work
 - Resources (for ideas/resource sharing)

To download a booking form to register for this event, please click here


Date: 8 February 2019
Venue:

Room FWB2.40, Franklin-Wilkins Building, King's College, London SE1 9NH


Back to Top

Japanese Online Course for Teachers   org

A unique opportunity for teachers to learn Japanese language & about Japanese culture!

Why don’t you teach your pupils Japanese language & culture at your school? We think your pupils will love it!

Please share this information with any colleagues who may be interested!

The Marugoto A1-1 (Katsudoo & Rikai) Tutor Support Course gives a comprehensive introduction to Japanese language and culture. This course will combine online self-study with submission of assignments to a real-life tutor, in addition to live lessons (1 live lesson covers 1 Topic) with the tutor.

You will get a certificate when you finish the course!

  • Application period: Deadline extended: 9th – 27th December 2019 (17:59 Japan time)
  • Course period: 15th January – 10th April 2020
  • Course fee: £80

For more information on the teaching materials and to try out Marugoto, please visit this website, which introduces the Marugoto Nihongo Online Course:

https://www.marugoto-online.jp/info/

Please note that we can only accept a maximum of 12 people on this course. Your suitability for this course will be assessed by the Japan Foundation London after we have received your application.

 

If you have any questions, please contact us at: info.language@jpf.org.uk

 

Click here for full details and to apply


Date: 9 December 2019 - 27 December 2019
Back to Top

[CANCELLED] Manga Workshop Masterclass with Shango Part of The Superlative Artistry of Japan touring exhibition   org

Due to unforeseen circumstances related to the ongoing public health concerns, we have sadly been forced to cancel this event.

Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience this last resort causes.

We hope to see you at our future events, once public event regulations have returned to normal.


Date: 21 March 2020 from 12.00pm
Venue:

Salford Museum & Art Gallery, Peel Park, The Crescent, Salford, M5 4WU


For more information, please click here.

Co-organised with:

Celebrating:

   

Back to Top

Sake Symposium: Understanding the Unique Aspects of Sake   org

The Japan Foundation and SOAS are hosting a special symposium looking at the Japanese phenomenon that is sake. Widely seen as the national drink of Japan, sake exports have been booming in recent years, with its unique taste and wide range of flavours, it has been appearing more and more on UK menus. This seminar will bring together experts to discuss sake from various perspectives: historically, culturally, commercially and diplomatically. 

The symposium will be followed by a sake tasting session, with experts on hand to guide you through the different types of sake available. 
We are delighted to be joined by five eminent speakers, each bringing a unique set of personal expertise. 

Heritage of Sake Making and Future 
Mr Koichi Saura ( 13th Generation of Kuramoto, Owner Urakasumi Sake Brewery, Vice President of Japan Sake and Shochu Makers Assosiation, Founding Chairman of Sake Samurai Association) 

Internationalisation of Sake
Mr Yusaku Shimizu (Minister of Finance at the Embassy of Japan in the UK) 

Sake Export from Japan and Overview of the UK Sake Market
Mr Hirohisa Ichihashi (Food Division Director of JETRO London) 

International Sake Promotion through the IWC Wine Platform
Mr Chris Ashton (Director of International Wine Challenge IWC) 

Promoting Sake Globally from London
Ms Rie Yoshitake (Sake Promoter, Sake Samurai UK, Rep of Japan Sake & Shochu Makers Association)

For more information and to see the speakers' full biographies, please visit the SOAS website.


Date: 20 February 2019 from 5.00pm
Venue:

Khalili Lecture Theatre, SOAS, London WC1H OXG


This event is free to attend, though booking is essential and spaces are limited. This is event is now fully booked. If you would like to be the first to hear about our events, please sign up to our e-bulletin here

Sponsored by:

A offical event of

Back to Top

THE鍵KEY performance   org

‘20 years of marriage yet I can’t speak with my wife’

But the husband is desperate to communicate with his wife about one subject in particular – their mutually unfulfilling sex life. Inspired by the novella of the same name by renowned Japanese author Junichiro Tanizaki, THE鍵KEY peers in on a secretive family and newcomer Kimura, as their lives take a dramatic turn following the husband’s new year resolution.

Fresh from its sell-out Tokyo run, this site-specific, Anglo-Japanese work invites audiences to become voyeurs as they move freely around a private residence to eavesdrop on small ensembles of singers, a dancer, and Japanese and Western instruments as this intimate drama unfolds… 

Produced by The Kagi Project in partnership with Japan Foundation. 

Supported by Arts Council Tokyo (Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture)

Music: Francesca Le Lohé

Words: Francesca Le Lohé with excerpts from Junichiro Tanizaki's 'The Key’ in the original Japanese.

 

Please note: Capacity for this show is very small, however tickets may be released nearer the time when the rehearsal process takes place. If you wish to go on a waiting list please email info@tete-a-tete.org.uk with the date and time of the performance you would like to be on the waiting list for.


Date: 3 August 2019 - 4 August 2019
Venue:

10 Tollgate Drive, London, SE21 7LS


For more information, please click here.

Back to Top

Japanese Avant-garde and Experimental Film Festival 2019   org

 

The Japan Foundation is proud to partner with the Japanese Avant-garde and Experimental Film Festival as they bring yet another exciting line-up of Japanese film titles to the UK.

2019: NATION | 国家 

This year's edition of the festival examines national identity, cultural memory and perceptions of history in Japan with a programme of classic avant-garde cinema and contemporary experimental short form film. This weekend festival of screenings will be complemented by introductions from experts, Q&As, a free panel discussion and a filmmaker’s workshop for aspiring video artists.


Date: 20 September 2019 - 22 September 2019
Venue:

Various, please follow the link below for more information on individual screenings.


For more information, please click here.

Presented by:

Celebrating:

 

Back to Top

Nara: Faith and Renewal – An International Symposium   org

Celebrating the opening of two special displays at the British Museum of loaned Buddhist and Shinto treasures, Nara: sacred images from early Japan (3 October – 23 November 2019), this international symposium with prominent scholars will provide an important historical and cultural background to three key periods in Nara in the past.


Date: 4 October 2019 - 5 October 2019
Venue:

BP Lecture Theatre, the British Museum, Great Russell St, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 3DG


For more information, please click here.

Organised by:

 

Celebrating:

   

Back to Top

Every Day A Good Day Screening
Preview Event for JFTFP20
  org

 

As a preview for the Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2020, the Japan Foundation is delighted to present a special screening of the film Every Day A Good Day (2018), directed by OMORI Tatsushi.

 

About the film

From the director of The Ravine of Goodbye (2013) and starring KIRIN Kiki (Shoplifters, 2018).

At the recommendation of her mother, 20-year-old Noriko (KUROKI Haru) and her cousin Michiko (TABE Mikako) start taking tea ceremony lessons with Takeda (KIRIN), who has a reputation for being an extraordinary teacher. At first, Noriko is confused by the intricate rules, but after two years she comes to realize the profundity of tea ceremony.

 

To reserve your space, please submit your interest here.

If you have not yet purchased a ticket to any of the programme screenings, you may add your name to the waitlist at the above link; please be advised that spaces cannot be guaranteed to those on the waitlist but will be released as they become available.


Date: 27 January 2020 from 6.30pm
Venue:

Screen 1, Soho Hotel, 4 Richmond Mews, London W1D 3DH


Image credit: ©2018 “Every Day a Good Day” Production Committee

For the nationwide lineup of screenings as part of the Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2020, please visit: www.jpf-film.org.uk

Celebrating:

   

Back to Top

Artist Talk by Iwasaki Takahiro   org

 

Iwasaki Takahiro is one of Japan’s most respected contemporary artists. Using everyday materials, Iwasaki is known for creating series of works that convey a fine sense of handiwork and technique of figurative representation. Exploring the relationship among art, space and nature, his iconic series, Out of Disorder (2006) is a sculptural installation of beautiful architectural miniatures made out of readily available materials such as towels, toothbrushes and rolls of duct tape. This series cemented his standing in the international contemporary art scene. His extraordinary skill of transforming ordinary materials into mesmerizing works is admirable and always challenges the perception of viewers.

 

His works have been taken up by many international exhibitions including Yokohama Triennale (2011) and the 2013 Asian Art Biennale in Taiwan. More recently he was also the representative artist for the Japan Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale.

 

Celebrating the Japan Foundation’s exhibition, The Superlative Artistry of Japan at the Salford Museum and Art Gallery (until 19 April 2020) where Iwasaki’s work is exhibited, Iwasaki will explain his work to date and the creation process of his sometimes painstakingly elaborate works, discussing the meaning of tangibility in contemporary art as well as why the labour intensive creative process is still important to him.

 

London:

Date: Tuesday, 10 March 2020, from 6:45pm

Venue: Royal Society of Arts (RSA), Durham House Street — off The Strand, London, WC2N 6HG

 

Salford:

Date: Wednesday, 11 March 2020, from 6:00pm

Venue: Salford Museum & Art Gallery, Peel Park The Crescent, Salford, M5 4WU


Date: 10 March 2020 - 11 March 2020

For more information, please click here.

Celebrating:

   

Back to Top

[CANCELLED] Guided Tour and Talk The Superlative Artistry of Japan touring exhibition   org

Due to unforeseen circumstances related to the ongoing public health concerns, we have sadly been forced to cancel this event.

Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience this last resort causes.

We hope to see you at our future events, once public event regulations have returned to normal.


Date: 29 March 2020 from 2.30pm
Venue:

Salford Museum & Art Gallery, Peel Park, The Crescent, Salford, M5 4WU


For more information, please click here.

Co-organised with:

Celebrating:

   

Back to Top

A Talk by Yukiko Mishima (Director of Dear Etranger)   org

Female director and screenwriter Yukiko Mishima's career spans nearly three decades, having started by writing and directing human documentaries for television. Her first feature film, The Tattoer, was released in 2009 and is based on Junichiro Tanizaki’s literary classic. Since then, Mishima had directed a further seven feature films, Bread of Happiness (2012) and A Drop of the Grapevine (2014) as well as A Stich of Life (2015) which was screened as part of the Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2017. Dear Etranger (2017), also one of the feature films in this year’s Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme, is Mishima’s sixth film which won the Special Grand Prix of the Jury Award at the 2017 Montreal World Film Festival. 

Following the UK premiere of Dear Etranger in early February, Mishima will join us in conversation with Dr Irene González-López of Kingston University, revealing the behind the scenes production of a poignant human drama which deliberates on the meaning of "family". Exploring the development of Mishima’s career up until now, she will also discuss her inspiration and creative style as well as what she cherishes in the process of filmmaking.


Date: 28 March 2019 from 6.30pm - 8.30pm
Venue:

The Soho Hotel, 4 Richmond Mews, London, W1D 3DH


This event is free to attend, but booking is essential. To book your place via Eventbrite please click here

Organised as part of the Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme jpf-film.org.uk

 

Back to Top

Japanese Education Workshop - Sharing Teaching Ideas for Creative Japanese Language Activities in Classrooms   org

(Japanese is below / 日本語は英語の下にあります)

English / 英語

The aim of this workshop is to increase the repertoire of teaching activities for teachers by using artwork and picture books in order to cultivate art appreciation, power of observation, thinking ability, language ability and creativity. This workshop will use the works of the artist Anno Mitsumasa as a resource. While experiencing the rich world of the artworks, through dialogue and collaboration we will explore the possibilities of creating classroom activities that value deep learning through the activation of imagination and creativity. This is a place where participants will be able to discuss and learn in small groups. We welcome teachers and also anyone who has an interest in educational activities using picture books.

-        Participation is free, but booking is essential.

Date/time: This workshop will be repeated twice. Please select the workshop on the date you can attend.

  1. First workshop: 19th October 2019 (Saturday) 14:00 to 17:00 (ten participants) – Book your place for the First Workshop
  2. Second workshop: 26th October 2019 (Saturday) 14:00 to 17:00 (ten participants) – Book your place for the Second Workshop

Third workshop added: Due to popular demand, we have added an extra workshop:

3. Third workshop: 23rd October 2019 (Wednesday) 14:00 to 17:00 (ten participants) - Book your place for the Third Workshop

Venue: The Japan Foundation, London (map) /101-111 Kensington High Street, London, W8 5SA

Workshop schedule

  •         13:45 – Meet at the entrance of the Japan House London gallery (basement)
  •         14:00 – 14:15 Self-introductions
  •         14:15 – 15:00 Introducing the concept of educational activities using art
  •         15:00 – 15:40 Creating ideas for activities
  •         15:40 – 16:00 Break
  •         16:00 – 16:40 Ideas sharing and group presentations
  •         16:40 – 17:00 Summary and reflections

 

Japanese  / 日本語

ワークショップでは、教師として活動のレパートリーを広げることを目的として、美術作品や絵本を活用し、鑑賞力、観察力、思考力、言語能力と創造性を育てるためのアクティビティを考えます。今回のリソースは安野光雅 の作品です。豊かな作品世界を味わいながら、個人の想像力と創造性の活性化、他者との協力や対話による学びの深まりを重視した教室活動の可能性を探ります。少人数でじっくり語り合い、学び合う場です。現職教師の方はもちろん、絵本を活用した教育活動に関心がある方のご参加を歓迎します。

 

  • 事前予約制(参加費無料) ※ご都合の良い日程でお申込みください
  • 日時:
  • ①10月19日(土)14:00-17:00(定員:10名)お申込みはコチラ
  • ②10月26日(土)14:00-17:00(定員:10名)お申込みはコチラ
  • 日時:追加日程:10月23日(水)14:00-17:00(定員:10名)お申込みはコチラ
  • 場所:国際交流基金 ロンドン日本文化センター (マップ)101-111 Kensington High Street, London, W8 5SA

 スケジュール

 

  • 13:45                Japan House London展示会場入り口(地下1階) 集合
  • 14:00-14:15      自己紹介&交流
  • 14:15-15:00      美術作品を活用した教室活動の紹介
  • 15:00-15:40      オリジナル活動案作成
  • 15:40-16:00      休憩
  • 16:00-16:40      発表
  • 16:40-17:00      まとめ&振り返り

Date: 19 October 2019 - 26 October 2019 from 2.00pm - 5.00pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London (map) /101-111 Kensington High Street, London, W8 5SA


Back to Top

New A-Level Workshop!『Motto Yomu CHIKARA』Workshop Part2 - Material Development   org

Lecturers: Shoko Middleton, Michiyo Kato and Sachiko Yamaguchi

Language of workshop: Japanese (parts of the workshop will be in English)

Workshop content: This will be a hands-on workshop including the following activities:

  • Brief introduction of the new A-Level.
  • Introduction of activities using “Motto Yomu CHIKARA (the old AS resource)” for your A-Level classrooms.
  • Group work divided by units: Learning from each other by showing your materials and exchanging ideas.
  • Sharing the posters you will make with all participants.

Fee: Free (Registration is essential. Participants will receive a certificate of attendance for CPD.)

Requirements: Participants must bring examples of A-Level teaching materials that they use. They do not need to make new materials/resources. A small amount of material is fine, such as:

  • Handout or homework (single sheet will be fine),
  • Activity/vocabulary cards you use in your lessons,
  • Some work made by your pupils,
  • Some data such as PPT or Quizlet (please bring your own laptop or ask to print out in advance),
  • Others

NOTE: Please be prepare to share your materials/resources and explain usage methods, any good points, any points to be improved, etc.

Registration: https://forms.gle/EUuoaobkPiifSnQFA

The deadline for registration is 10th Feb (at 17:00).

Limit of the participants: up to 30 teachers
Registration may close before the deadline if the number of participants reaches maximum capacity.

Contact: Hiroko Tanaka            hiroko.tanaka@jpf.org.uk


Date: 22 February 2020 from 1.00pm - 5.00pm
Venue:

Venue: Monticello House, Anglo Educational Services

45 Russell Square,
London, WC1B 4JP
(Nearest stations: Russell Square, Euston, Holborn etc.)


Back to Top

[CANCELLED] Director Talk with Maeda Tetsu   org

Due to unforeseen circumstances related to the ongoing public health concerns, we have sadly been forced to cancel this free event.

Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience this last resort causes.

We hope to see you at our future events, once public event regulations have returned to normal.

In the meantime, however, the screenings of A Banana? At This Time of Night are still scheduled to play at a selection of our regional partner cinemas – for more information on this, please click the link below.

A Banana? At This Time of Night


Date: 23 March 2020

As part of:

Celebrating:

   

Back to Top

What is Manga?   org

Manga has boomed in popularity in recent years. Whilst it is enjoyed globally by a varied audience, there remains a lack of understanding about its breadth and depth, and its relationship with Japan and the rest of the world. This symposium aims to redefine manga by suggesting ways of looking at it as a cultural activity and an expression of historical activities.

Although manga has become a major global art form, East and West remain relatively isolated from each other in the field of comic studies. By bringing together scholars, manga artists and manga industry members from Japan, Europe and beyond, the symposium creates a dialogue on the definition, reaches, and impact of manga in a global context, seeking to find and answer the questions that need to be answered about this global, cultural phenomenon.

Click here to view the day's programme.

Presented by the Japan Foundation and SISJAC, in collaboration with British Library.


Date: 23 August 2019 from 10.00am - 5.30pm
Venue:

Knowledge Centre
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London
NW1 2DB


Booking is available through the British Library's Website.
Full price £15
Students/Under 18's/Concessions £8

The programme was created with support form the British Museum

Back to Top

Japan Foundation at the Language Show London 2019   org

Come and see the Japan Foundation at the Language Show London 2019!

The Language Show London is a language event for those who offer products and services ot language teachers, learners, translators, linguists, language professionals and businesses.

This year, the Japan Foundation is once again giving visitors a chance to learn about Japanese language and culture. We will be running Japanese language tasters, talks and an information stand!

Our attractions include:

  • The Japan Foundation Information Stand

When: 15-17 November (Fri-Sun) 2019

Where: Olympia London, Hammersmith Road, London W14 8UX

Packed full of information about studying and teaching Japanese in the UK, staff members from the Japan Foundation London would be delighted to give you advice on learning Japanese or teaching Japanese. We can also write your name in Japanese for you, and teach you how to write it yourself!

  • Talk: Cross curricular learning: Japanese through maths

When: 17 November (Sunday), 3:30pm to 4:15pm

As student take-up of languages decreases and languages are squeezed out of the curriculum, Clare Kuroishi, an experienced Japanese classroom teacher, talks about the techniques and outcomes of incorporating languages with other subjects based on her experience of incorporating Japanese with the teaching of mathematics.

  • Japanese Language Tasters

When: 15 November (Friday), 2:15pm to 2:45pm / 16 November (Saturday), 4:30pm to 5:00pm

Ever wanted to try learning Japanese? Experience Japanese language first hand with our taster sessions! Beginners welcome. There will be two tasters, one on Friday and a repeat on Saturday.


Date: 15 November 2019 - 17 November 2019
Venue:

Olympia London, Hammersmith Road, London W14 8UX


For more information, please click here.

Back to Top

The Fifteenth Japanese Speech Contest for University Students   org

Come along and listen to what university students studying Japanese in the UK and Ireland have to say! The finalists will give their speeches and presentations in Japanese to an audience consisting of members of the public, fellow students, teachers, families, key figures from the UK-Japan community and a panel of judges.

This event is FREE to attend, but prior registration is required.

To register to attend, please click here.

(The deadline to register is 25th February, Tuesday)

The Fifteenth Japanese Speech Contest for University Students is organised by the British Association for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language (BATJ) and the Japan Foundation London in joint partnership. The event provides an opportunity for students from the UK and Ireland to demonstrate their Japanese speaking skills.

Download our event poster!


Date: 29 February 2020 from 1.00pm - 6.00pm
Venue:

Great Hall, King's College London

Strand Campus, Strand, London WC2R 2LS


There will be areception form 6:00pm to 7:00pm.

The 15th Japanese Speech Cont4est is generously supported by:

 

 

Back to Top

Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) July 2020   org

Due to Covid-19, the JLPT July examination has been cancelled in the United Kingdom. Applicants will be contacted by the Test Centre they registered with. Please wait for them to get in contact. 

 

The next JLPT will take place on Sunday, 5th July 2020 at two locations in the UK, London (SOAS University of London) and Edinburgh (The University of Edinburgh). The registration at each test centre will start in early- mid March.

 

Please see each university’s website for the application opening date and further details for registrations.

 

 

Please note that the registration at each test centre may close earlier when the test centre has reached its maximum capacity.

 

The Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) is designed to evaluate and certify the Japanese-language proficiency of non-native speakers of Japanese. The test is conducted twice a year, in July and December, in Japan and various locations around the world.

 

For more information about the JLPT exam and where to take the test, please visit the Official JLPT website


Date: 5 July 2020
Back to Top

Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) December 2019   org

The Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) is a test which evaluates and certifies the Japanese-language proficiency of non-native speakers of Japanese.The test is conducted twice a year, in July and December, in Japan and various locations around the world.

The next JLPT will take place on Sunday 1st December 2019, at three locations in the UK: London (SOAS University of London), Edinburgh (the University of Edinburgh) and Cardiff (Cardiff University). 

Registration will open at each test centre as follows:

Please note that the registration at each test centre will close when the test centre has reached its maximum capacity.

For more information about the test, please visit the JLPT website.

 


Date: 1 December 2019
Back to Top

Still Walking + Q&A with Hirokazu Kore-eda   org

The Japan Foundation is incredibly pleased to be associated with BFI’s special screening of Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Still Walking, followed by a Q&A session with the director himself. Do not miss this rare opportunity to interact with the most critically acclaimed and among the most widely distributed of contemporary Japanese live-action directors. 

Still Walking (2008, Japan)

Forty-year-old Ryota, with his wife and stepson, visits his elderly parents to commemorate his older brother, who died saving a boy from drowning. Kore-eda’s subtle, moving account of the tensions within a family is his most Ozu-like film, a study of the different assumptions and value systems of different generations. This was the director’s first film to feature veteran actress Kirin Kiki, who would become his regular collaborator.

 

Screening details

Date: Tuesday 16th April 2019, 18:30

Venue: NFT1, BFI Southbank, Belvedere Rd, Lambeth, London SE1 8XT

 

Tickets open for sale to the general public on 11 April at 4pm. To book, please visit the BFI website here.


Date: 16 April 2019

                                              

Back to Top

An Introduction to Japanese Kagura by Professor Terence Lancashire   org

Join us for a lecture on kagura, given by Professor Terence Lancashire of Osaka Ohtani University.

From ancient times, various traditional entertainments have been created and evolved in Japan’s long history. These range from the court ensemble of gagaku to the theatre of noh, kabuki and puppetry and various instrumental ensembles including the three stringed shamisen and 13 stringed koto. In contrast to these urban forms there are a wide variety of folk performing arts which includes the shrine ritual entertainment of kagura.

Kagura, a ritual entertainment performed primarily in Shinto shrines, is one of the five main categories of Japanese folk performing arts as defined by the Agency for Cultural Affairs. Having its origins in the mythical dance of the goddess Ame no Uzume no Mikoto before a cave in which the sun goddess, Amaterasu Omikami, has hidden herself, kagura has been realised in various forms of entertainment over its long history. The oldest is the dance of miko, shrine maidens. But through the course of its history, it has also developed into theatrical representations of ancient Japanese myths and historical episodes.

Through this special talk, which will provide an overview of Japanese folk performing arts, you will discover the historical background and characteristics of this time-honoured traditional art, as well as learn how the custom has stood the test of time leading up to present day.


Date: 27 September 2019 - 28 September 2019
Venue:

Ystafell Augustus a Gwen John Room, National Museum Cardiff, Cathays Park, Cardiff CF10 3NP

and

Eliot Room, The British Library, 96 Euston Road, London NW1 2DB (Sold out, return tickets only)


In collaboration with:

                

 

Celebrating:

 

Back to Top

Fabula Collective - Ley Line   org

 

“Four striking works align, taking the audience on an exploration of reflection, purification, self and identity. Together we navigate an energetic path that illuminates the significance of our connection as human beings through unspoken word.

The Japan Foundation is delighted to partner with Fabula Collective on a contemporary dance production presented at Sadler’s Wells this October. A mixed bill performance choreographed by James Pett, Travis Clausen-Knight, and Japanese contemporary dance artist Kahiko Narisawa, the project emphasises the collaboration between Japanese and British dancers, bridging the cultures of the two countries and facilitating a meeting of minds to exchange skills, knowledge, technique and creative ideas.

The performance will be followed by a conversation between the dance artists and Sanjoy Roy, dance writer and critic for the Guardian.


Date: 8 October 2019 from 7.15pm
Venue:

Sadler’s Wells Theatre, Lilian Baylis Studio, Roseberry Avenue, London EC1R 4TN


For more information, please click here.

In Partnership with:

Celebrating:

 

Back to Top

Screening of Singing Lovebirds (1939)   org

 

The Japan Foundation is delighted to partner with the British Film Institute and Independent Cinema Office in presenting Singing Lovebirds (1939) directed by Masahiro Makino, as part of the Musicals! The Greatest Show on Screen season.

Director Makino was considered the Busby Berkeley of Japan and in this warm-hearted musical about the tangled love lives of the samurai, the influences of Hollywood are clear. Fusing jazz numbers with traditional Japanese joruri provides a very hummable mix of east and west. Fans of Kurosawa might be surprised to see Shimura, star of Seven Samurai, in a singing role.

Screening at the following dates and venues across the UK:

Arts Picturehouse, Cambridge

BFI Southbank, London

Cultureplex, Manchester

BFI Southbank, London

QUAD, Derby

Depot, Lewes

GFT, Glasgow

Queen’s Film Theatre, Belfast

Showroom Workstation, Sheffield

Eden Court, Inverness

Tyneside, Newcastle

 

Saturday, 19 October 2019 at 20:00

Sunday, 20 October 2019 at 15:50

Saturday, 2 November 2019, at 20:00

Friday, 8 November 2019 at 18:40

Saturday, 9 November 2019 at 15:00

Wednesday, 20 November 2019 at 21:00

Tuesday, 26 November 2019 at 18:30

Sunday, 8 December 2019 at 15:30

Sunday, 8 December 2019 at 15:15

Monday, 16 December 2019 at 20:00

Tuesday, 7 January 2020 at 18:30

 

..with more dates and venues to follow!


Date: 19 October 2019 - 7 January 2020

Presented in Partnership with:

 

Celebrating:

   

Back to Top

Japan Foundation/BAJS Japanese Studies Postgraduate Workshop 2020: Publishing Your Research   org

The Japan Foundation/BAJS Postgraduate Japanese Studies Workshop is returning for its 8th year and will be held at SOAS, University of London.

The theme for this year is ‘Publishing Your Research’ and will focus on helping participants navigate the world of academic publishing. Throughout the student-focused workshop, participants will be guided both leading scholars and those with insider knowledge of the academic publishing industry. The workshop also provides an excellent opportunity for networking among PhD students and academics, as well as a forum to discuss future collaborations. Organisations will also be presenting their funding programmes and giving details of how they can help.

Student Submissions:

Once registered, we ask students to send in a piece of work that they will be submitting for publication in the future. The work will be shared ahead of the event and feedback on submitted work will be provided by other students and academics throughout the morning session in small groups. If you are unable to submit a piece of work you can still participate in the event and provide feedback to other students. If you have any questions about this, please contact Mara Patessio at mp78@soas.ac.uk

Travel Grants:

The Japan Foundation is able to offer a partial travel grant of £70 per attendee after attendees have covered the first £20 of their fare. The British Association for Japanese Studies is able to offer £50 per attendee towards the cost of accommodation.

Registration:

Registration for this event has now closed. 

Registration is free and the workshop is open to UK based PhD students who are undertaking research about Japan (including comparative) in humanities and social science subjects.

Should places still be available, registration will be extended to masters students on January 13th.

The final deadline for registration is January 21st.


Date: 13 February 2020 from 10.00am
Venue:

SOAS, University of London
London, WC1H 0XG


Back to Top

Love and Desire Between Women in Girls' manga   org

Date: 25 May 2019 from 2.30pm
Venue:

The Swedenborg Society | Swedenborg Hall | 20-21 Bloomsbury Way | WC1A 2TH London | United Kingdom


For more information, please click here.

This event is held in association with Japan Society.

  

Back to Top

Japan Youth Challenge 2019   org

Hosted at UCL (University College London), the UCL-Japan Youth Challenge (UJYC) brings together pre-university students from the UK and Japan in a 10-day summer school programme, as well as hosting various public events. 

Students from both countries will engage in a series of topic-focused activities including workshops, lectures and a symposium. Our highlight is the Grand Challenge Workshop where “Accessibility for All: AI and Robotics”, a topic important in our society today.

You can find more information by downloading the programme brochure here

Eligibility

Non-Japanese sixth-form students residing in the UK, aged 15, 16, 17 and 18 years (Parental consent will be required prior to the event. All students are supervised by UCL staff during the event.) Students will be joined by a group of Japanese students from Japan

Application Deadline

There is no application deadline, though early applications are encouraged as places are limited. 

Applications

To apply please visit https://www.ucl-japan-youth-challenge.com/ 
For enquiries, please email programme conductor Hideyuki Miyahara

Public Events:

The Japan Youth Challenge are proud to present a public screening of the short documentary Imphal 1944.

This documentary tells the story of Japanese veteran Masao Hirokubo and the Battle of Imphal, a key turning point of the East-Asian Theatre in World War Two. Hirokubo devoted a great deal of his life to reconciliation work with his former adversaries. This heart-warming documentary looks at his early reconciliation work and reflects on the interconnectedness of the three countries involved and on the futility of war.  

The screening will be followed by a talk and a Q&A by the director Junichi Kajioka

Date: 23 July 2019, Doors open at 17:00 - Screening begins at 17:40

Venue: UCL Medical Sciences 131 AV Hill LT
            Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT

This screening is free to attend, but registration is required.

The UCL Japan Youth Challenge will culminate in the UCL-Japan Youth Challenge Symposium

This event will bring together industry profressionals, academics, and athletes to discuss the importance of AI and robotics in the field of accessibility. Part one of the symposium will focus on the current state of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant and Part two will focus on accessibility in other areas. 

The symposium will be followed by a reception. 

Date: 26 July 2019, from 13:00. 

Venue: University College London,
            Christopher Ingold Building, XLG2 Auditorium
            WC1H 0AJ 

This symposium is free to attend, but registration is required. 

 

Students from both countries will engage in
a series of topic-focused activities including
workshops, lectures and a symposium.
Our highlight is the Grand Challenge Workshop
where you will discuss “Accessibility for All”,
a topic important in our society today.Students from both countries will engage ina series of topic-focused activities includingworkshops, lectures and a symposium.Our highlight is the Grand Challenge Workshopwhere you will discuss “Accessibility for All”,a topic important in our society today.

Date: 20 July 2019 - 27 July 2019

 

Volunteers

We are currently seeking volunteers to help at this event. Please click here for more details (in Japanese).

Back to Top

Iwami Kagura Dance Performances come to the UK!   org

 

We are delighted to welcome the Otsu Kagura Troupe who will perform special shows of the Iwami Kagura dance tradition in the UK. Come and join us at the places and dates below – fun for the whole family! No booking required.

What is Iwami Kagura? 

Kagura is a Shinto theatrical dance and music dedicated to the deities of Japanese mythology. It originated from a mythical event recorded in the Kojiki, a 1,300-year-old historical record of Japan, in which the female deity of dance and the arts dances to coax the female deity of the sun out of hiding in a cave so that her light would grace the world again. The older and ritualistic form is still performed at the Imperial Court, and the more theatrical forms are staple in local communities in regions of Japan.

Iwami Kagura is a form of kagura native to Iwami region of western Shimane Prefecture. It has about 300 years of history and is performed mostly during the annual celebrations of shrines in the autumn to dedicate it to the deities in gratitude and to pray for an abundant harvest throughout the year. The repertoire includes ritual dances and narrative plays based on myths. The magnificent dance, up-tempo music, and flamboyant costumes are captivating, and although being a traditional performing art, it continues to evolve over times.

 

Who are the Otsu Kagura troupe?

The troupe was founded in 1999 as the new generation to carry on the tradition of Iwami Kagura. The troupe works on preserving and developing the tradition by making new plays as well as devoting itself to preserve the classic plays to convey the appeal of the indigenous and traditional kagura. The troupe performs 41 plays and presents around 50 performances annually, performing also at many events in other cities as well as in urban areas and overseas.

The troupe also operates Mai-no-za, the first dedicated theatre for Iwami Kagura opened in April 2019, with the aims of developing new fans and making the facility as the base of promoting the kagura not only for locals but also domestic and international visitors.


Date: 27 September 2019 - 29 September 2019
Venue:

 

Main Hall, National Museum Cardiff, Cathays Park, Cardiff CF10 3NP

and 

Entrance Hall, The British Library, 96 Euston Road, London NW1 2DB

and

Japan Matsuri 2019, Trafalgar Square, London


In collaboration with:

                  

 

Celebrating:

 

Back to Top

The 15th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students   org

We are delighted to announce that the 15th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students is open for applications!

This contest gives students the chance to make their voices heard in Japanese, and win some fantastic prizes! Finalists will all perform their speeches on Saturday 29th February 2020 in the Great Hall, King’s College London.

:: Contest Aims
The main purpose of the event is to improve the speaking and presentation skills of students studying Japanese as a foreign language. Through this event, we hope to promote Japanese language learning at higher education level in the UK and Ireland.

:: Who can apply?
The contest is aimed at undergraduate students who are currently studying Japanese as a foreign language at a university in the UK or Ireland.

 

There are three different categories:

1. Speech Category:  For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard C1 or C2 at a university the UK or Ireland including as an elective, optional or other university-based language course. Five finalists will be selected.

Application Deadline: 11th November 2019 

 

2. Individual Presentation Category: For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard B1 or B2. Participants will give a PowerPoint presentation using Japanese. The aim of the presentation is to introduce a particular theme to the audience, for example a region, event, custom, etc. from the UK or another country outside Japan. Five finalists will be selected.

Application Deadline: 9th December 2019 

 

3. Group Presentation Category: For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard A1 or A2. Participants will take part in groups of two to four students and give a PowerPoint presentation using Japanese. The aim of the presentation is to introduce a particular theme to the audience, for example a region, event, custom, etc. from the UK or another country outside Japan. Five groups which are selected to present during the finals day will be given a special award.

Application Deadline: 16th December 2019

*Details of JF Standard can be found here:

http://jfstandard.jp/pdf/jfs2015_pamphlet_eng.pd

 

Videos from the 14th Contest Finals Day can be viewed here - Coming soon!

Please see the files below for contest poster, FAQ and application forms for each category.

Frequently Asked Questions

Contest Poster

Attention: poster revised on 04/10/2019

Speech Category Application Form

Speech Category Rules and Guidance

Individual Presentation Category Application Form

Group Presentation Category Application Form



Date: 27 August 2019 - 16 December 2019

Back to Top

Animator Talk with Takeshi Yashiro   org

 

Takeshi Yashiro is a Japanese animator and television commercial director. Having graduated from Tokyo University of the Arts in 1993, he helmed numerous commercials produced by Taiyo Kikaku Co. Ltd. before focusing on finessing his stop-motion animation techniques and beginning to make his own animated films. His short film Moon of a Sleepless Night (2015) was a Jury Selection at the 20th Japan Media Arts Festival and a sample of his most recent work, Gon, The Little Fox (2019) has been exhibited at the Content Tokyo 2019 as well as participating in Marché International du Film d'Animation in Annecy.

On the rare occasion of his appearance at the Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival in Cardiff, the Japan Foundation is delighted to welcome Takeshi Yashiro for a special talk event this October. In this illustrative talk, Yashiro will divulge his professional transition from directing large-scale commercials to creating stop-motion films where his role varied from writer and animator to designer of sets and puppets. He will also discuss his dedication to the painstaking work of hand crafted stop-motion animation and talk us through the stages of producing an animation, from storyboard to screen.


Date: 7 October 2019 from 6.30pm
Venue:

Courthouse Hotel Cinema, 19 - 21 Great Marlborough Street, London W1F 7HL


For more information, please click here.

In Celebration of:

   

Back to Top

Nihongo Cup 2020   org

Nihongo Cup is the Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary School students across three categories: Key Stage 3, Pre-GCSE Key Stage 4/5, and Post GCSE Key Stage 4 and 5.

Finalists will be invited to perform their speech at the Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies, University of Oxford in front of a panel of judges and VIPs from the field of Japanese language education and Japan-UK relations, for the chance to win some fantastic prizes – including a trip to Japan!

Finals day will take place on 27th June 2020 (Saturday). Due to the ongoing situation regarding Covid-19, this year the Finals Day will be an online event. This event will have limited spectators. We will update our website with more information soon. We thank you for your understanding.

You can also find articles about previous Nihongo Cup finals on our News Page.

To find out more and for application forms, please download this "Application Pack" zip file by clicking here.

The Application Pack contains an application form, information and rules and a flier/poster.

The closing date for applications is: 20th March 2020

Applications for the 2020 Nihongo Cup are now CLOSED. 



Date: 27 June 2020

Nihongo Cup is organised by the Association for Language Learning (ALL) and the Japan Foundation London.

Back to Top

Events at the Flatpack Festival 2019   org

In partnership with the Flatpack Festival, the Japan Foundation is delighted to be bringing a series of satellite events to the festival's programme. 

Bento Workshop:

Showing two of her short stop motion animations films, Konigiri-kun Music Box and Konigiri-kun ShoppingMari Miyazawa will be giving two Kyara-ben workshops. Mari will be demonstrating how to mark incredible looking, edible characters using food. 

Date: May 5th 2019, 12:30-13:50 (Intended for younger participants)
                                16:30-17:50 (Intended for adult participants) 

Venue:  Kanteen,
             The Custard Factory,
             Gibb Street,
             Birmingham, B9 4AA

Booking: To book your tickets, please visit the Flatpack Festival Website

 

Japanese Language Taster Session:

If you have ever wanted to try your hand at speaking some Japanese, this is the perfect opportunity. Staff from the Japan Foundation will be offering a free and fun Japanese Language Taster Session. 

Date: 5th May 2019, 14:45 - 15:30

Venue:  Kanteen,
             The Custard Factory,
             Gibb Street,
             Birmingham, B9 4AA

Booking: This event is free to attend, but book is essential. Please book here to claim your place.

 

Origami Workshop

There will also be a drop in workshop enabling you to take a look into the world of Origami. Come and learn how to fold beautiful objects with the Japan Foundation Staff and impress your friends with your paper folding prowess.

Date: 5th May, 12:00 - 15:00 (Come and go as you please) 

Venue: The Framers (Opposite Kanteen)
            The Custard Factory
            Gibb Street
            Birmingham, B9 4AA

Booking: There is no need to book this session, feel free to drop in at any time. 


Date: 5 May 2019

Back to Top

Unite Wales and Japan: Experience Japan and the Rugby World Cup   org

We are working with the Old Penarthians Rugby Club and Cardiff University to run an upcoming event on 6th October celebrating the Rugby World Cup.

There will be two identical sessions taking place on the day and participants choose which one to take part in. The event is open to participants aged eight to fourteen along with their parents or guardians.

  • Session One: 2:00pm to 3:30pm
  • Session Two: 4:00pm to 5:30pm

The maximum number of participants per session is 40.

Activities planned:

-        Warm-up exercises while learning some Japanese.

-        Rugby-themed Japanese language activity.

-        Japanese culture session learning about the Welsh rugby team’s training camp in Japan, origami, and Japanese tea.

Please note: This event is open only to members of the Old Penarthians Rugby Club

Organised with:

 


Date: 6 October 2019
Venue:

Old Penarthians Rugby Club,  St Mark’s Road, Penarth, CF64 3PF 


 

  

Back to Top

Nihongo Cup 2019 - Finals Day   org

Come and see the UK's talented young students of Japanese language at the Finals Day of the Nihongo Cup - the Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary Schools!

Students from all levels of secondary education – Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5 – will showcase their amazing talent and hard work in their Japanese language studies while competing for some fantastic prizes – including a trip to Japan!

Entry is free – No booking required.

To read our report about last year's finals day, click here.

Schedule

  • 12:00 – 12:30  Arrival and registration
  • 12:30 – 12:35  Welcome Speeches:
  •   Eiji Taguchi, Director  General, Japan   Foundation London
  •   Professor Sho Konishi, Director of the Nissan   Institute of Japanese Studies
  • 12:35 – 12:40  Introduction to Programme: Anne Rajakumar,   JLC, Master of Ceremonies
  • 12:40 – 13:00  Speeches from Key Stage 3 Finalists
  • 13:00 – 13:15  Interval (Holbrook Primary School   performance)
  • 13:15 – 13:40  Speeches from Key Stage 4&5 pre-GCSE   finalists
  • 13:40 – 14:00  Interval
  • 14:00 – 14:05  Presentation on the Japanese  Speech   Awards:
  •   Kei See (former pupil of Hockerill Anglo-  European College)
  • 14:05 – 14:55  Speeches from Key Stage 4&5 post-GCSE   finalists
  • 14:55 – 15:15  Interval
  • 15:15 – 15:20  Comments by Chair of Judges
  • 15:20 – 15:40  Prize giving ceremony
  • 15:40 – 15:45   Closing Speech: Toshinori Sano,
  •   Embassy of Japan
  • 15:45 – 16:30  Refreshments
  • 16:30  Close

To download a poster for this year's Finals Day, click here


Date: 22 June 2019 from 12.30pm - 4.30pm
Venue:

Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies, University of Oxford

27 Winchester Road, Oxford, OX 2 6NA


For more information, please click here.

The Nihongo Cup is co-organised by the Japanese Language Committee of the Association for Language Learning (ALL) and the Japan Foundation London.

 

In collaboration with the Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies, University of Oxford

Supported by:

    

Back to Top

Call For Applications: Europe-Japan Intellectual Exchange Session 2019   org

The Japan Foundation and the Centre Européen d'Études Japonaises d'Alsace (CEEJA) are now accepting applications for the Europe-Japan Intellectual Exchange Session 2019 in Alsace, scheduled for September 30th - October 1st 2019. The Japan Foundation and CEEJA have carried out a series of seminars since 2007, with an aim to encourage networking among young researchers on Japan in Europe and further promote Japanese studies in Europe.

The title of this year's study seminar is "Representations of Japanese Culture and Arts in Europe: from 'Japonism' to 'Cool Japan'. (ヨーロッパにおける日本の文化・芸術のイメージ -「ジャポン二スム」から「クールジャパン」へ)Please note that the language of this event will be Japanese with no interpretation. 

Applicants from Europe are being sought from a wide range of fields including Sociology, Arts, Literature, History, Language, Philosophy, Political Science, Economics etc. 
Applicants must currently be on a graduate or post-graduate scheme or hold a junior teaching/research position at an academic institution in Europe. 

For more details and applications, please click here. (Japanese version). 

The deadline for applications is July 12th 2019. 


Date: 30 September 2019 - 1 October 2019
Venue:

Centre Européen d'Études Japonaises d'Alsace
Kientzhein
France

Back to Top

MODE 2019 - Performances by Yosuke Fujita and ASUNA   org

 

As part of an annual series of artist-curated sonic and interdisciplinary events in extraordinary spaces, MODE 2019 (produced by Thirty Three Thirty Three), the Japan Foundation is delighted to partner on welcoming artists Yosuke Fujita and ASUNA as they create distinct live sonic performances.

Yosuke Fujita presents NOISEEM

Yosuke Fujita creates distinct live sonic performances that are inspired by traditional Japanese Gagaku music; incorporating flowing water, the human voice and analogue reel tapes to create spatial and sonic compositions that are designed to stimulate and embrace the eye and the ear. For the European premiere of NOISEEM, he will employ synthesised water tanks interconnected with a unique pipe organ fabricated by Fujita to construct an immersive environment that aims to elicit embodied multi-sensory experiences.

In conjunction with his performance work, Fujita has featured in numerous exhibitions including INVISIBLE LAKE (2015), presenting a sound installation that focused on underwater sounds, and CELL (2017) at the Sapporo International Art Festival, which comprised of a sonic work that amplified the sounds of black soldier fly larvae buried in the soil.

ASUNA: 100 KEYBOARDS

Japanese sound artist ASUNA has been creating experimental music and installation work since the late 1990s. He is a pioneer in the experimental ambient/drone/ improvisation scene in Japan and has collaborated with both Japanese and international electronic musicians.

ASUNA will be using 100 battery-powered analogue keyboards to create waves of overlapping sound in the Clore Studio.

The instruments sit in concentric circles, each one playing a single note to produce an electronic chorus in this site-specific listening experience.


Date: 19 September 2019 - 2 October 2019
Venue:

Camden Arts Centre at Cork Street, 5-6 Cork Street, London W1S 3NY

and

South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Road, London SE5 8UH


Celebrating:

 

Back to Top

Author Talk: Kyoko Nakajima   org

Kyoko Nakajima is a Japanese fiction writer and essayist, who started her career as a novelist with “FUTON” in 2003. Nakajima’s highly acclaimed novels have won multiple prestigious literary prizes in Japan including the Izumi Kyoka Prize for “When My Wife Was a Shiitake” (Tsuma ga Shiitake data koro), the Naoki Prize for “The Little House” (Chiisai Ouchi), the Shibata Renzaburo Literature Prize for “One-Horn!” (Katazuno), and the Chuo Koron Literary Prize for “The Long Goodbye” (Nagai Owakare). 

This event has been organised in conjunction with Japan Now 2019 and will celebrate the publication of the first English translation of Nakajima’s “The Little House”, a novel for which Nakajima tactfully took in huge volumes of research materials in order to vividly depict the life of a middle-class family in prewar Japan.

Nakajima will discuss her view of the world and Japanese society, and her sources of inspiration which make her novels versatile and unique, yet which also make them resonate in our lives regardless of the space and time she sets her stories in.

Kyoko Nakajima will be accompanied by Ginny Tapley Takemori, the translator of “The Little House” and many other Japanese contemporary novels, and the evening will be moderated by Megan Bradshaw, the former UK editor of the Asymptote Journal.

The English translation of “The Little House” is out on 31 January. Japan Foundation is supporting the publication through the Japan Foundation Translation and Publication Support Programme.


Date: 22 February 2019 from 7.00pm
Venue:

London Review Bookshop. 


For more information, please click here.

  

Back to Top

Dance Beyond Movement: Talk with Saburo Teshigawara & Rihoko Sato (KARAS)   org

Saburo Teshigwara is one of the most influential Japanese performers and choreographers to date and highly acclaimed for his innovative forms of physical expression that break away from conventional stylistic techniques. Starting his creative career in 1981 after studying plastic arts and classic ballet, he soon went on to form his performance company KARAS. Since then, Teshigawara and KARAS have enjoyed the international fame and accreditation, regular performances at prominent venues such as Sadler’s Wells and Southbank Centre. They have also collaborated with principal dance companies including Frankfurt Ballet and Nederlands Dans Theatre, to name only a few. Teshigawara’s keenly honed sculptural sensibilities, powerful sense of composition, command of space and decisive dance movements all come together to create his unique world. He is also a keen advocate of the potential that dance can hold outside established techniques, engaging in people of all kind of life and abilities and facilitating journeys of self-discovery through the medium of dance.

 

Celebrating his and Karas’s 2019 European tour of their new work “The Idiot” and the performance at the Print Room at The Coronet, London, this special talk, inviting Teshigawara and Karas‘s leading dancer, Rihoko Sato will discuss the development of their movement style as well as their creative vision while revealing the working process for “The Idiot” and others.

 

Saburo and Rihoko will be joined in conversation by Sanjoy Roy, the dance writer for the Guardian.


Date: 29 March 2019 from 9.00pm - 10.00pm
Venue:

The Print Room at The Coronet, 103 Notting Hill Gate, Kensington, London W11 3LB


The price of the ticket for the talk is £5, you can book the following ways:

By Phone     Box Office: 020 3642 6606

Online          www.the-print-room.org

In person     Box Office Opening Hours Monday – Saturday: 10.00 am – 6.00 pm

 

UK Premiere of Teshigawara’s ‘The Idiot’ is performed at the Print Room at The Coronet between 20th – 30th March, 2019

To book visit https://www.the-print-room.org/

 

This event is co-orgainised in conjunction with Print Room at The Coronet

Back to Top

Anime's Human Machines   org

In 1963 Osamu Tezuka’s TV series Astro Boy brought a new kind of robot to Japan. The robot child with a loving heart began a line of compelling, conflicted cyborgs whose existence challenges humanity.

Japanese animation has embraced robotics, cybernetics and artificial intelligence as major themes. More interestingly, it uses these themes to explore complex moral and social questions: humanity’s responsibility for its actions, response to the other, greed, short-termism, failure to care for the ecosystem that sustains us.

The Japan Foundation is delighted to be associated with Barbican's season which examines the challenge of the man-machine interface through eight films on various aspects of humanity’s response to technological change. One interesting factor to emerge from these films is how our own view of technology has changed since the earliest was released. Another is how humanity still refuses responsibility for the impact of our actions. These films give no answers, but suggest responses.


Date: 12 September 2019 - 30 September 2019
Venue:

Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London, EC2Y 8DS


For more information, please click here.

    

Back to Top

Artist Talk by Kohei Nawa   org

Award-winning artist, Kohei Nawa, is currently one of the most prominent names in the world of contemporary art. His iconic PixCell series – sculptural installations in which objects such as deer are overlaid with transparent glass beads – stormed the world at the beginning of the century, with Nawa becoming a well-known name among prestigious exhibitions, in either solo or group shows. His work entitled Foam was presented at the Aichi Triennale 2016 in Japan, featured in the FUKAMI exhibition held at Hôtel Salomon de Rothschild, Paris in 2018, while his monumental Throne was housed at the Musée du Louvre, Paris, until last February, to list only a few prominent projects. 

After graduating from Kyoto City University of Art, he attended a sculpture course at the Royal College of Art in London where he was exposed to stimulating contemporary influences such as Antony Gormley. Ever since, Nawa has been a forerunner of his generation of creators, not only due to his mind-bending sculptures but also through his constant experimentations as an artist pushing the boundaries of his own comfort zones. This may be witnessed in his collaborations with like-minded and cutting edge artists, in the spheres of design, architecture, fashion, and performing arts.

Celebrating his involvement in the expressive dance piece VESSEL at Sadler’s Wells on 16th and 17th April, the Japan Foundation is proud to host a very special artist talk where Kohei Nawa will introduce his most representative concepts to date, his inspiration, as well as some pioneering works inspiring a new generation of Japanese creative minds. Divulging his aims in rejecting popular stereotypes linked to Japanese contemporary arts such as manga and anime, he will also explain his method of transforming lifeless industrial materials into dynamic, aesthetically pleasing works of art, sometimes offering delightful sensory experiences.


Date: 18 April 2019 from 6.45pm
Venue:

Royal Society of Arts (RSA) | Durham House Street - off The Strand | WC2N 6HG London


For more information, please click here.

This event celebrates Kohei Nawa's VESSEL show at Saddler's Well on April 16th and 17th, supported by the Japan Foundation's Performing Arts Japan for Europe Grant Programme. For more information and tickets to VESSEL please click here

 

Back to Top

Japan Information Day 2019   org

The Japan Foundation are proud to be a co-organiser of Japan Information day 2019. Along with other Japan related organisations and universities, we will be introducing our programmes, grants, and the work that we do in the fields of Japanese Language and Japanese Studies. 

With an increasing number of tourists as well as international students choosing Japan as their destination, British interest in Japan, including its higher education and research institutions, has been growing. The day aims to provide relevant professionals with information about various opportunities for graduates in teaching, studying and conducting research in Japan. This is the only annual event in the UK where attendees can learn about the diverse programmes in these fields.

For more information including the event timetable, please click here
(Please note that this event is not suitable for students)


Date: 17 May 2019 from 12.15pm - 4.30pm
Venue:

The Embassy of Japan in the UK, 
101-104 Picadilly
London
W1J 7TJ


Registration for this event has now closed. For any equiries please contact scholarship@ld.mofa.go.jp





Back to Top

Manga Speaks Japanese!   org

Do you like manga? Are you interested in language? If so, why not come join our free interactive session on Japanese used in manga on 27th July!

We’ll be talking about the linguistic features of manga, such as the varied and ubiquitous onomatopoeia that appear in manga and how a character’s region, gender, age and more, influences their speaking style.

Taking inspiration from the “Seto and Utsumi” film screening on the same day, we will also invite participants to explore the world of Kansai dialect as spoken in the film and its source manga. The Kansai dialect of Western Japan is very different from standard Japanese and is famous as the dialect of Japanese comedians and straight-talking, sardonic manga characters. This is a chance to learn about an aspect of Japanese that you won’t find in a traditional text-book and to get a glimpse of the regional diversity of the Japanese language.

 As global interest in manga boomed, the genre has served as a window into Japanese life and culture.  This presentation will help people to better appreciate manga through deeper understanding of  the words used in manga and their cultural meanings. They say that manga is 50% images and 50% words, and we want to give everyone, from absolute beginners to fluent speakers,  a chance to dive deeper into the language used by manga artists and what it means.

This is a relaxed, fun event and we welcome those with no Japanese ability all the way up to people fluent in the language: all you need to bring is an interest in Japan. For manga fanatics who are interested in the Japanese used in the medium, this is a definite must-attend. And if you are planning a trip to Western Japan in the future, why not brush up on your knowledge of the unique speaking style, values and sense of humour of the region?

We look forward to seeing you at our event!

Advanced booking is required - please book using the links below:

We will be running the same session twice:


Date: 27 July 2019
Venue:

Knowledge Centre, The British Library, 26 Euston Road, London, NW1 2DB


For more information, please click here.
Back to Top

Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) December 2018   org

The Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) is a test which evaluates and certifies the Japanese-Language proficiency of non-native speakers of Japanese. The test is conducted twice a year in Japan and various locations around the world. More than one million people in eighty-one countries and areas worldwide registered for the JLPT exam in 2017. Please visit the JLPT website for more information about the test. You can try sample questions here.

The next JLPT will take place on Sunday, 2 December 2018 at the three locations in the UK: SOAS, the University of London, the University of Edinburgh, and Cardiff University.

- Applications to take the JLPT have now closed at all test sites.


Date: 2 December 2018

Application deadlines: - Applications to take the JLPT have now closed at all test sites.

Back to Top

Japan Now 2019   org

Japan Now returns this February with a series of events around the UK celebrating the most exciting Japanese literature and culture.

​On 23rd February there will be a day of keynote talks at the British Library in London; novelist Yu Miri and filmmaker Hikaru Toda will discuss how Japan confronts taboo subjects, Kyoko Nakajima, David Peace, Sayaka Murata and Yuya Sato will discuss their novels, and photographer Tomoko Yoneda will relate her global perspective to her home country of Japan.

In parallel with Japan Now, Japan Now North once again will be held in Sheffield for a week of exhibitions, talks and readings from artists and authors including Yurie Nagashima, Risa Tsunegi, Louise Rouse, Rie Iwatake, David Peace and Yu Miri. 

Regional events will also take place in BathNottinghamManchesterCambridgeNorwich and Cardiff from 19-21 February and will feature many authors for Japan Now.

There is also a dedicated Translation Day at the Free Word Centre on the 22nd February. Japanese literature is now the fourth most translated into English, and the new generation of Japanese translators will discuss the challenges and rewards they face in their work.


Date: 19 February 2019 - 23 February 2019
Venue:

Venues around the UK. 


For more information, please click here.

Back to Top

A Timeless Pallette:
The Story of wa no iro - Japanese Colours
  org

Over centuries, Japan has developed a colour palette unique to its nation and with deep connection to its inimitable nature. Owing to the very subtle distinctions in the shades and grades of these colour schemes, 450 hues of wa no iro have been catalogued. These have been developed within and cherished by, not only Japanese art spheres such as textiles, pottery and even literature, but also by the Japanese people’s values and lifestyles, underlining their rich sense of beauty.

In conjunction with the Living Colours: Kasane – the Language of Japanese Colour Combinations exhibition at Japan House, the Japan Foundation has invited Sachio Yoshioka, a master dyer, colour historian and author of many books on the topic of Japanese colours – including Nihon no Iro Jiten (Dictionary of Japanese Colours) – to define what the term ‘Japanese colours’ means to him. Focusing on several colours which signify the indigenous character, Yoshioka will explain their derivations as well as the way they have been utilised, adapted and, in some cases, even forgotten throughout the passage of time. He will also discuss the application of Japanese colours to contemporary society, demonstrating the method of achieving the mesmerising blends.


Date: 8 April 2019 from 6.45pm
Venue:

Royal Society of Arts (RSA) | Great Room | 8 John Adam Street | WC2N 6EZ London | United Kingdom


In association with IndigoRose Project.

This talk event is supported by Japan House.

More information on the Living Colours: Kasane – the Language of Japanese Colour Combinations exhibition can be found here.

 

Back to Top

Japanese Children's Day in Orkney   org

The Japan Foundation, London is proud to be co-organising the Japanese Children's Day family event at King Street Halls in Orkney.

The event is organised by Orkney Islands Council, Orkney Japan Association, The Consulate-General of Japan in Edinburgh, The Japan Society of Scotland and blue earth works.

There will be many fun activities, including origami, traditional dance and calligraphy, as well as delicious snacks to eat.

Plus! There will be an ikebana demonstration and flower workshop for children from 11:00am to 12:00pm for primary school children aged seven and older. You can download a flyer with more information by clicking here.

Please note that prior registration is required to take part in the ikebana workshop. Please contact OJAinfo@btinternet.com by close of day Tuesday 30 April 2019. 

The Japanese Children's Day is FREE to take part in.


Date: 4 May 2019 from 11.00am - 4.00pm
Venue:

King Street Halls, Kirkwall East Church, King Street, Kirkwall, KW15 1JF


Back to Top

Japanese Photography Revisited:
Talk by Dr Lena Fritsch and Miho Kajioka
  org

Japanese photography is without doubt one of the most admired art forms from Japan and has established its name as a respectable artistic genre from its introduction into the country. It has constantly evolved in technique, subject matter and even perception, both from the side of its creators as well as viewers. Photography in Japan today is extremely diverse, open to interpretation, and in constant flux, raising multiple questions about its definition.

In celebration of Photo London 2019, Dr Lena Fritsch – Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Ashmolean, specialist in 20th and 21st-century Japanese art and photography, and author of the book Ravens & Red Lipstick: Japanese Photography since 1945 (published in 2018) – will talk about notable moments in the history of Japanese photography and the diversity of the medium. She will present her most recent research and reflect on her encounters with photographers in Japan.

She will be joined by Miho Kajioka, a Japanese artist dealing in the medium of photography whose works are fast becoming well-recognised in the European market. Explaining her definition of the art form in question, she will divulge why she chose to utilise the camera in her creations, as well as trace the journey that this particular medium will take in Japan going into the future.


Date: 17 May 2019 from 6.45pm
Venue:

Royal Society of Arts (RSA) | Durham House Street - off the Strand | WC2N 6HG London


For more information, please click here.

Back to Top

Kansai Yamamoto: More is more   org

 

One of the most renowned fashion designers of our time joins us for an exclusive talk.

Best known for era-defining designs for David Bowie on the 1972 Ziggy Stardust and 1973 Aladdin Sane tours, Kansai Yamamoto’s collections developed a following among the most iconic names in pop culture.


In this special talk, for which the Japan Foundation is proud to partner with V&A Dundee, the seminal designer will discuss his notable career, his motto of ‘more is more’, and the concept of costumes as a medium for liberated expression of identity. Yamamoto will reveal the inspirations behind his design philosophy and how he draws on the art history of Japan to produce his elaborate creations.


Rejecting the visual stereotype of Japanese minimalism (wabi-sabi), and embracing the aesthetics of basara, a love of colour and stylish extravagance, Yamamoto’s avant-garde, theatrically decorative and abstract designs are instantly recognisable for their recurring features such as Asiatic prints and sculptural forms. His influence continues to inspire today’s most cutting edge designers and leading fashion houses, from Nicholas Ghesquiere to Gucci and Valentino.


Date: 3 July 2019 from 1.00pm
Venue:

V&A Dundee  |  Juniper Auditorium  |  1 Riverside Esplanade  |  Dundee DD1 4EZ


For more information, please click here.

Co-presented with V&A Dundee:

 

Part of:

Back to Top

Nihongo Cup 2018 - Finals Day   org

Nihongo Cup 2018 - Finals Day

Come and see the UK's most talented young students of Japanese language at the Finals Day of the Nihongo Cup - the Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary Schools!

Students from all levels of secondary education – Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5 – will showcase their amazing talent and hard work in their Japanese language studies while competing for some fantastic prizes – including a trip to Japan!

Entry is free – No booking required.

To download a poster for this event, click here

To read our report about last year's finals day, click here.


Date: 16 June 2018 from 12.30pm - 4.30pm
Venue:

Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL




The Nihongo Cup is co-organised by the Japanese Language Committee of the Association for Language Learning (ALL) and the Japan Foundation London.

Supported by:Nihongo Cup 2018 Sponsors

Back to Top

Wakan: The Colourful Life of Japanese Herbs
From Organic Dyeing to Bath Salts
  org

Japanese herbalism, or wakan, has an intricate origin and development story. Extracted from organic flora, the natural benefits of plants and roots native to Japan have long been applied to medicine, food as well as fragrance. More recently, as contemporary interest in harnessing the power of nature is on the up rise, herbs have also started to be utilised in spheres ranging from cosmetics and bath salts to fashion, revitalising people’s life in Japan. Another fact that is not as well-acknowledged, however, is that such contemporary applications share their indigenous herbal ingredients with the Japanese tradition of textile dyeing which had contributed to the aesthetic beauty of the country’s culture for many centuries.

Following the event focused on native colours of Japan on 8 April, in this special talk, Kakuro Sugimoto, a dyer as well as a third generation chemist of the Sugimoto wakan pharmacy, will delineate the development and philosophy of Japanese herbs, referring to some of the most representative plants – in particular those of which use is shared by the health and dyeing cultures. He will also illustrate the great versatility of Japanese herbs and their potential effect on our body and life.

This talk provides a rare opportunity to obtain a first-hand glimpse into the hidden world of Japan’s rich and colourful health culture from one of Japan’s most progressive herbalists. Together with Tetsuo Sugimoto, he will also hold a small demonstration to showcase the close relationship between dyeing and Japanese herbs.


Date: 10 April 2019 from 6.45pm
Venue:

Royal Society of Arts (RSA) | Durham House Street - off The Strand | WC2N 6HG London


 

                                        

Back to Top

Japan Foundation and British Association for Teachers of Japanese Spring Seminar   org

The JF/BATJ Spring Seminar, Participatory Approaches and Drama for Learning, will take place on Saturday 27th April.

This will be a hybrid seminar – participants may join in either in-person or online.

  • Workshop Leader: Kumiko Uehara (The Japanese-German Centre Berlin)
  • Facilitator: Yuko Fujimitsu (Japan Foundation, London, BATJ Member)

Presenters:   The 2017 and 2018 cohort of the Training Programme for Japanese Language Education in Europe (voluntary speakers)

  • Hiroko Tanaka (Japan Foundation, London, BATJ Member)
  • Miho Tokimoto (Sapienza Universita di Roma)
  • Kaori Nishizawa (University of Oxford, BATJ member)
  • Sawako Nemoto (L’Association Franco-Japonaise Paris-Sud, Cours de Japonaise)
  • Nozomi Yamaguchi (University of Manchester, BATJ member)

To see the provisional programme and to book your place, please click here 

Discounted fee applies until 10th April.


Date: 27 April 2019 from 10.30am - 5.30pm
Venue:

Room G3, SOAS, University of London 10 Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London WC1H 0XG


For all enquiries, please contact Ms Kaori Nishizawa: seminar@batj.org.uk

Back to Top

Summer Explorers 2019! Manga based film mini season   org

 

Our annual Summer Explorers season is back – this time taking place at the British Library!

From over the top, offbeat narratives of psychic teenagers and upstart political wrangling in a high school environment, to spectacular battles between good and evil, and stories of tender friendships Summer Explorers 2019 : Manga Comes To Life – Live Action Japanese Film Based on Manga showcases the range of plotlines that manga has provided film creatives over the years.

Come and see the versatility of the influence that manga has had on Japanese cinema!

Click on the individual titles of the films in this year's lineup for screening details and ticket booking:

Saturday, 27 July

Sunday, 28 July

TEIICHI: Battle of Supreme High


Date: 27 July 2019 - 28 July 2019
Venue:

British Library  |  Knowledge Centre Theatre  |  96 Euston Road  |  St Pancras  |  London NW1


For more information, please click here.

Presented and Curated by the Japan Foundation, in collaboration with the British Library:

 

Part of:

Back to Top

Nihongo Cup 2019   org

Nihongo Cup is the Japanese Speech Contest for Secondary School students across three categories: Key Stage 3, Pre-GCSE Key Stage 4/5, and Post GCSE Key Stage 4 and 5.

Finalists will be invited to perform their speech at the Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies, University of Oxford in front of a panel of judges and VIPs from the field of Japanese language education and Japan-UK relations, for the chance to win some fantastic prizes – including a trip to Japan!

Finals day will take place on 22nd June 2019 (Saturday). Finals will take place at the Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies, University of Oxford.

You can also find articles about previous Nihongo Cup finals on our News Page.

To find out more and for application forms, you can download the Zip file linked below.
Please note that the application deadline has now passed


Date: 22 June 2019
Download NC2019 Application Pack

Nihongo Cup is organised by the Association for Language Learning (ALL) and the Japan Foundation London.

          

Back to Top

Artist Talk: Mari Katayama   org

In the photographic self-portraits of Mari Katayama, the artist’s body features prominently, surrounded by painstakingly arranged objects, both in intimate settings or set against vast landscapes. The recipient of the Grand Prize at Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi 2012, Katayama was born with various developmental challenges, and had both legs amputated at age nine and has since lived with prosthetics. Using her body as a living sculpture, Katayama photographs herself among intricately embroidered objects, hand-sewn mannequins and her prosthetic legs. Katayama’s photography has been exhibited at museums such as the Gallery J, Arts Maebashi and the Museum of Modern Art in Gunma, Traumaris Gallery in Tokyo and Kitchen Gallery in Paris, and has also featured in group exhibitions at the Metropolitan Art Museum and the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo and La Criée in Marseille, amongst others.

In conjunction with her solo exhibition at the White Rainbow Gallery, Katayama will be delivering a talk on her artistic process, touching on how her physical difficulty has informed her work and influenced her body images, along with having a conversation with Simon Baker, director of the Maison Européenne de la Photographie in Paris.


Date: 24 January 2019 from 6.45pm
Venue:

Royal Society of Arts


For more information, please click here.

This event has been organised in collaboration with White Rainbow Gallery, where Mari Katayama's solo exhibition will run from 24 January 2019 to 2 March 2019, and it is celebrating the Embassy of Japan's Season of Culture. 

Back to Top

Japanese Youth Conference in Scotland   org

There will be a Japanese Youth Conference in Fife on 6th March. 82 P6 and P7 pupils will enjoy activities such as Japanese language lessons, karate, calligraphy, origami and radio exercises.

Co-organised by:

  • The Japan Foundation, London
  • Japanese Language and Culture Group for Scottish Schools
  • Crossgates Primary School
  • Hill of Beath Primary School

Supported by: The Consulate General of Japan in Edinburgh


Date: 6 March 2019 from 10.30am - 12.30pm
Venue:

Crossgates Primary School


   

Back to Top

A Visual Feast - The Culinary Microcosm of the Japanese Lunch Box   org

The traditional Japanese lunch box, or bento, has undergone a number of metamorphoses over the long course of its history, becoming a staple and a unique point of pride in Japanese cuisine. Depending on the occasion, bento can range from a mass-produced lunch container available from railway stations, to lovingly hand-crafted compartmentalised meals set in equally stylish lacquerware. However, the most notable transformation may be perceived in the category of home-made lunch, the ingredients of which not only form an appetising meal but also, with increasing intricacy, a visually engaging one. This is known as kyara-ben (character bento) and it is particularly enjoyed by children, who will often receive bento bearing the likeness of famous manga and anime characters. 

In collaboration with the Flatpack Festival, we are happy to welcome Mari Miyazawa — a leading bento arranger and animation filmmaker whose work includes short films such as Twins in Bakery (2013) — to talk about the development of vibrant bento creations in Japan. Herself having invented a similarly illustrative genre of oekaki-ben (picture bento) in which food is arranged to resemble an intricately decorated scene or landscape, Miyazawa will also provide an introduction to turning ingredients into edible characters, revealing how her ideas attain the balance between nutrition and visual appeal. 

This event is aimed at showing our audience that creating an edible work of art is something enjoyable everyone can do and be proud of!


Date: 3 May 2019 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Royal Society | Dining Room 6-9 Carlton House Terrace | SW1Y 5AG London


For more information, please click here.

This event is run in partnership with the Flatpack Film Festival as part of which two of Miyazawa's film shorts will be screened in the Trailblazers collection in Birmingham, and where she will run two workshops demonstrating how to create Character Bento.

 

Back to Top

Leicestershire Young Ambassador Japan Conference   org

On Wednesday 3rd of July, Year 5 pupils from various schools in Leicestershire will take part in a day of sports and Japanese culture to celebrate the run-up to the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games. As part of the Leicestershire Young Ambassador Japan Conference, the children will enjoy Japanese radio exercises, taiko drumming, Japanese lessons, origami, haiku, dancing and MORE!

The children will also get a chance to meet a real-life Paralympian: Great Britain Wheelchair Rugby team member, Nick Cummins, and his coach Rob Tarr.

  

 

It promises to be a fantastic day highlighting the links between sports and culture. Stay tuned for our report from the event!


Date: 3 July 2019 from 9.00am - 2.30am
Venue:

Fraser Noble Building (Education Department) of the University of Leicester


Organisers:

Supported by:

Back to Top

The 14th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students   org

We are delighted to announce that the 14th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students is open for applications!

This contest gives students the chance to make their voices heard in Japanese, and win some fantastic prizes! Finalists will all perform their speeches on Saturday 2nd March 2019 at King’s College London.

:: Contest Aims
The main purpose of the event is to improve the speaking and presentation skills of students studying Japanese as a foreign language. Through this event, we hope to promote Japanese language learning at higher education level in the UK and Ireland.

:: Who can apply?
The contest is aimed at undergraduate students who are currently studying Japanese as a foreign language at a university in the UK or Ireland.

 

There are three different categories:

1. Speech Category:  For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard C1 or C2 at a university the UK or Ireland including as an elective, optional or other university-based language course. Six finalists will be selected.

Application Deadline: 22nd November 2018 (applications for this category have now closed)

 

2. Individual Presentation Category: For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard B1 or B2. Participants will give a PowerPoint presentation using Japanese. The aim of the presentation is to introduce a particular theme to the audience, for example a region, event, custom, etc. from the UK or another country outside Japan. Five finalists will be selected.

Application Deadline: 10th December 2018 (applications for this category have now closed)

 

3. Group Presentation Category: For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard A1 or A2. Participants will take part in groups of two to four students and give a PowerPoint presentation using Japanese. The aim of the presentation is to introduce a particular theme to the audience, for example a region, event, custom, etc. from the UK or another country outside Japan. Five groups which are selected to present during the finals day will be given a special award.

Application Deadline: 17th December 2018 (applications for this category have now closed)

*Details of JF Standard can be found here:

http://jfstandard.jp/pdf/jfs2015_pamphlet_eng.pd

 

Videos from the 13th Contest Finals Day can be viewed here

Please see the files below for contest poster, FAQ and application forms for each category.

- Frequently Asked Questions

- Contest Poster

- Speech Category Application Form

- Speech Category Rules and Guidance

- Individual Presentation Category Application Form

- Group Presentation Category Application Form



Date: 24 August 2018 - 17 December 2018

The 14th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students is generously supported by:

 

     

Back to Top

Composing for Ninagawa: A Talk by Yasuhiro Kasamatsu   org

Yasuhiro Kasamatsu is Japan’s acclaimed composer who has a wide-ranging repertoire from chamber music, to opera, to musicals. However what has made him stand out the most is his involvement in theatre productions, in particular the staging of the works by Yukio Ninagawa who sadly passed away in 2016. Keeping close contact with the theatre giant, Kasamatsu composed music pieces for Ninagawa’s “Hamlet”, “Pericles” and “The Twelfth Night” among many others, which played a significant role towards their stage success. His credits also extend to film and TV dramas such as Hirokazu Kore-eda’s 1998 film “After Life”.

In this special talk, Kasamatsu will share his insights into his creative process when composing music, as well as reflecting on the prolific partnership between him and Ninagawa. With representative pieces on board, he will also discuss the way his music attuned to Ninagawa’s spellbinding stages, helping convey the narratives and how it complimented the mood and flow.

This will provide a rare opportunity to uncover the hidden stories of the Ninagawa production process from a musical perspective which you might have never witnessed before.


Date: 21 January 2019 from 6.30pm
Venue:

Kings Place, London N1 9AG


For more information, please click here.

Yasuhiro Kasamatsu has been sent to the UK by the Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan as a cultural envoy. There will be a special concert on Yasuhiro Kasamatsu's music pieces including the second movement from String quartet No.4, “Sone-zaki” for string quartet, based on Bunraku (Japanese traditional puppet theater), at The Grosvenor Chapel on 27 January from 17:30.

Back to Top

Japan Foundation and British Association for Teachers of Japanese Seminar   org

The Japan Foundation and British Association for Teachers of Japanese Seminar will take place on 23rd February 2019 at Manchester University.

The theme of the seminar is: "Theory and Practice to Connect Japanese Language Education”

The speaker will be Chihiro Kinoshita Thomson, a Professor of Japanese Studies at New South Wales University.

The seminar is open to both BATJ members and non-members.

Please note the seminar will be held in Japanese.

 

Participation fee: £5 (flat fee for both BATJ members and non-members; pay at the door)

Online participation: This seminar will also be available online as a partial live-streaming test for BATJ members ONLY.  There is no fee for those wishing to participate online.

 

To see the abstract and to book your place, please click here (Japanese) or here (English)

(Currently online registration is open only for in-person participation. The registration for online participation will be opened shortly).


Date: 23 February 2019 from 2.00pm - 5.00pm
Venue:

University of Manchester Student Union, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PR


Enquiries: seminar@batj.org.uk

Back to Top

Hand in Hand   org

Hand In Hand is choreographed by Chisato Minamimura and is produced by Nicole Vivien Watson of Surface Area Dance Theatre and Paul Miller of Rory Studio and supported by Moving Art Management.

Join Dance City for a sharing of work by international deaf dance choreographer Chisato Minamimura, presented in Dance City’s Theatre, in collaboration with visual artist Graham Patterson and musician Tom White. The sharing is the finale of a week-long project led by Chisato with 20 extraordinary deaf and hearing dancers, who are inspired to respond to Chisato’s unique creative practice. 

Post Show Social: Join Dance City in the 'Dance City’s Café' for an informal post-show discussion and social gathering from 7pm. 

Hand In Hand is supported by Arts Council England, Dance City, Surface Area Dance Theatre, Rory Studio, Moving Art Management and The Japan Foundation.


Date: 22 March 2019 from 6.00pm
Venue:

Dance City
Temple Street
Newcastle Upon Tyne
NE1 4BR


Tickets cost £6 and are available through Dance City's website.

Back to Top

Artist Talk by Nobuko Tsuchiya   org

Date: 28 June 2019 from 6.30pm
Venue:

Impact Hub King's Cross, 34b York Way, King's Cross, N1 9AB London


For more information, please click here.

This event is held in collaboration with Yorkshire Sculpture International 2019 and the Leeds Art Gallery where Nobuko Tsuchiya’s work will be exhibited.

 

                                                

Back to Top

Music & Manga: A Vision of Sound   org

 

Shinichi Ishizuka is an award-winning manga artist who uses his personal experiences and pursuits to inspire the subject matter of his works. Together with his editor, Katsuki Dai (who has edited a number of manga magazines and worked with top manga artists), Ishizuka has created a wildly popular graphic series BLUE GIANT and BLUE GIANT SUPREME.  The series centers around a young saxophonist and his passion for jazz, as modelled on Ishizuka’s own familiarity with the instrument.

In celebration of the Citi exhibition Manga at the British Museum (23 May – 26 August 2019), the Japan Foundation is proud to partner with Asia House for their event welcoming Ishizuka and Dai who will discuss the challenges and pleasures in creating a story manga and explore how integral the depiction of sound is in the series. The discussion will include insights into the collaborative processes and relationship of the artist and editor in the creation of story manga. The moderator for the evening will be Professor Nicole Coolidge Rousmaniere, IFAC Handa Curator in Japanese Arts at the British Museum and lead curator of the Manga exhibition.

This event is held in collaboration with the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures, The British Museum, and supported by the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation.


Date: 11 July 2019 from 6.45pm
Venue:

Asia House, 63 New Cavendish Street, W1G 7LP London


For more information, please click here.

In collaboration with:

         

And Supported by:

 

Back to Top

Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2019   org

 

Love, in all its semblances and dimensions, is a state so universally experienced by humankind that it has provided a perpetual source of inspiration in the long history of global cinema. Japanese cinema is no different. Love and the associated feelings of passion, affection, and destruction, in equal measure have all been channelled into a pivotal driving force behind the rise of many Japanese filmmakers, crystallising in timeless works which form part of the nation’s artistic repertoire.

The Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2019 features thoughtfully selected works, all focusing on this theme in one way or another. As the conventional binaries defining what it means to love continually give way to new understandings of this sweeping emotion, so too does this year’s curation aim to provide insights into a wider context of love in Japanese society.

Embracing other complicated emotions that go hand in hand with love, the programme aims to provide a more comprehensive picture of Japanese relationships, ranging from conventional love stories, LGBT issues, familial devotion, compassion for the fellow man, transgressive attractions, to profound renderings of the devastation felt with the loss of love


Date: 2 February 2019 - 28 March 2019
Venue:

Cinemas across the UK. 


For more information, please click here.

For all information on the selected films and participating venues, please visit our dedicated website by following the link above.

 

Back to Top

Born in Okinawa   org

Celebrating the UK premier screening of Born Bone Born as part of the Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2019, join us for an evening dedicated to Okinawa, Japan’s tropical southern paradise. Dating back to the time of the Ryukyu Kingdom, Okinawa developed a beautiful and colourful history and fascinating cultures, including unique food, music and language.

The evening will be led by Dr Vicky Young (University of Cambridge), who will give an overview of Okinawa, its history, culture and language. The evening will also feature live performances from the London Okinawa Sanshinkai, showcasing traditional Okinawan music and dance.

This is a free event but spaces are limited and book is essential, to book your place please click here.

Born Bone Born directed by Toshiyuki Teruya (Gori) will be screened at Institute of Contemporary Arts in London on 10 February and further 6 UK venues between February and March 2019. For more information and other screenings, please visit the special website Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme.

©2018 "Senkotsu" Production Committee


Date: 25 January 2019 from 6.30pm - 7.30pm
Venue:

Japan House, London
101-111 Kensington High Street
London
W8 5SA


With thanks to the London Okinawa Sanshinkai and Okinawa Kenjinkai of UK for their co-operation and special thanks to Japan House London.

 

Back to Top

The 14th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students - Finals Day   org

Come along and listen to what university students studying Japanese in the UK and Ireland have to say! The finalists will give their speeches and presentations in Japanese to an audience consisting of members of the public, fellow students, teachers, families, key figures from the UK-Japan community and a panel of judges.

This event is FREE to attend, but prior registration is required.

To register to attend, please click here.

(The deadline to register is 27th February, Wednesday)

The Fourteenth Japanese Speech Contest for University Students is organised by the British Association for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language (BATJ) and the Japan Foundation London in joint partnership. The event provides an opportunity for students from the UK and Ireland to demonstrate their Japanese speaking skills.

Download our event poster!


Date: 2 March 2019 from 1.00pm - 6.00pm
Venue:

Great Hall, King's College London, Strand Campus, Strand, London WC2R 2LS


There will be a reception from 6:00pm to 7:00pm.

The 14th Japanese Speech contest is generously supported by:

 

 

Back to Top

Pre-Summer Explorers! 2019   org

26 June

29 June

30 June


Date: 26 June 2019 - 30 June 2019
Venue:

Screen 1, The Soho Hotel, 4 Richmond Mews, W1D 3DH London

and

Prince Charles Cinema, 7 Leicester Place, WC2H 7BY London


Back to Top

Noh Reimagined 2018: Sublime Illusions   org

After the success of Noh Reimagined in 2016, we're pleased to accounce its return for 2018 - Noh Reimagined: Sublime Illusions.

This year's edition will showcase Mugen ("phantasmal") Noh - a genre of Noh in which the main actor appears as a ghost in the dream of a travelling monk, who is played by the supporting actor. The ghost then tells the tragic story of its past life, expressing deep regret and lamentations, hoping to find peace through the monk's prayers for it.

Bringing together top Noh performers from Japan with British artists and neuroscientists, join us for this two-day festival, with its interdisciplinary performances, workshops, and talks, to explore time, space, and symbolism in Noh theatre.


Date: 29 June 2018 - 30 June 2018
Venue:

Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, N1 9AG


For more information, please click here.

Curated and produced by mu:arts and International Noh Project Committee, Tokyo, in partnership with Kings Place, Japan Foundation, and the Noh Theatre Research Institute, Hosei University

Back to Top

Japan Foundation/BAJS Japanese Studies Postgraduate Workshop 2019: Career Progression   org

We are delighted to announce that the 2019 Japan Foundation and British Association for Japanese Studies (BAJS) Postgraduate Workshop will be held at Cardiff University. 

This workshop aims to assist the development of the next generation of Japanese Studies researchers and academics currently studying in the UK. Every year it provides a great opportunity for students to receive practical advice on their own research from senior colleagues, and to get to know fellow postgraduate students and members of the Japanese Studies Community. 

This year's interactive workshop will centre on career development in academia/research in the UK, Japan and abroad. It will include several sessions by senior academics addressing concerns and challenges faced by at the early stages of an academic career and how to take full advantage of the opportunities available. There will be a chance for students to present their research and receive feedback from both peers and senior colleagues. There will also be an opportunity to hear from organisations and the funding they can offer for current and future research. 

Eligibility: Registration is open to postgraduate students in Japanese Studies as well as those undertaking Japan related research in other disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Priority will be given to Ph.D candidates. 

This year the Japan Foundation are able to provide partial travel grants: please e-mail the below address for more details.

BAJS are also offering a grant to help cover the cost of accommodation please click here for details.

Registration for this workshop has now closed. If you would like to be the first to hear about all of our events in the future, please sign up for mailing list


Date: 8 March 2019 from 10.30am - 5.45pm
Venue:

Cardiff University, Wales


*Doors will open from 10:00AM.

To register, or if you have any questions, please e-mail Programme Office Michael Salter at michael.salter@jpf.org.uk 

Back to Top

Art that Speaks: Meiro Koizumi   org

Meiro Koizumi (1976, Gunma, Japan) investigates the boundaries between the private and the public, a domain of specific importance to his native Japanese culture. His videos are often based on performances and constructed scenarios. He places characters, played by himself or others, in awkward situations. Often starting harmoniously he gradually heightens the tension manipulating the situation from humorous to painful. His performances focus and enlarge the moment when a situation gets out of control, becomes embarrassing or breaks social rules. His distinguished approach is demonstrated in his video work Confessions (2014), in which he interviews a Japanese man that had left for Paris to join the French Foreign Legion in hopes of experiencing battle. Through his variety of media from film to sculptures and collages, he often centres on the uneasy and awkward interactions that question socially acceptable stereotypes of behaviour. 

In conjunction with his solo show and White Rainbow Gallery, Meiro Koizumi will, in this special talk, introduce his representative works to date and his challenging attitude towards the subject. He will also discuss to what degree art should speak and what it should speak about. 

Koizumi's works have been exhibited worldwide including Mexico City, Texas, Amsterdam, London, New York, Burgos (Spain), Ho Chi Minh (Vietnam),Sydney and Tokyo. His works are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Kadist Art Foundation, Paris, and the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam.   


Date: 22 November 2018 from 6.45pm
Venue:

Royal Society of Arts (Durham Street Auditorium), Durham House Street (off The Strand), London, WC2N 6HG


This event is free to attend, however booking is essential. To book your free place via eventbrite, please click here  

Back to Top

Inclusive Bodies - Creation in dance with different physicality   org

According to the European Youth Portal 'Dance is a universal human activity'. In spite of this all-encompassing notion, it is only in recent years that all body types have been given access to similar levels of training for performance (although these opportunities are still not widespread). While words such as 'diversity' and 'inclusivity' have been the key to opening the doors of performing arts in the 21st century, there are still questions as to how these buzz words are applied in the creative process to all physicality - disabled and non-disabled, Asian and European, in order to both embrace and celebrate their differences.

According to the European Youth Portal 'Dance is a universal human activity'. In spite of this all-encompassing notion, it is only in recent years that all body types have been given access to similar levels of training for performance (although these opportunities are still not widespread). While words such as 'diversity' and 'inclusivity' have been the key to opening the doors of performing arts in the 21st century, there are still questions as to how these buzz words are applied in the creative process to all physicality - disabled and non-disabled, Asian and European, in order to both embrace and celebrate their differences.
In this special seminar, the Japan Foundation has invited Stopgap Dance Company, a UK-based company of disabled and non-disabled dancers, to deliver a short presentation of research undertaken with internationally acclaimed Japanese choreographer and dancer, Yukio Suzuki, and Japanese disabled dancer, Kenta Kambara. The research sought a way for the disabled and non-disabled dancers involved (from Europe, UK and Japan) to use their bodies to portray what is in their minds during their performances, exploring similarities of approach between Stopgap's inclusive creative processes and that of Butoh. Joined by UK-based choreographer Adam Benjamin, they will explore in discussion the way they understand physical and cultural differences, and how these differences contribute to creativity in dance making. 

In this special seminar, the Japan Foundation has invited Stopgap Dance Company, a UK-based company of disabled and non-disabled dancers, to deliver a short presentation of research undertaken with internationally acclaimed Japanese choreographer and dancer, Yukio Suzuki, and Japanese disabled dancer, Kenta Kambara. The research sought a way for the disabled and non-disabled dancers involved (from Europe, UK and Japan) to use their bodies to portray what is in their minds during their performances, exploring similarities of approach between Stopgap's inclusive creative processes and that of Butoh. Joined by UK-based choreographer Adam Benjamin, they will explore in discussion the way they understand physical and cultural differences, and how these differences contribute to creativity in dance making. 


Date: 11 June 2018 from 7.00pm
Venue:

Sunley Pavilion, Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London, SE1 8XX 

Photo Credit: Chris Parkes
The research project between Stopgap Dance Company and the Japanese artists, Yukio Suzuki and Kenta Kambara is supported by the Japan Foundation through the Performing Arts Japan for Europe grant programme.
This event is free to attend but booking is essential (places are limited). To book your place via Eventbrite, please click here. If you have any accessibility requirements please let us know when booking by contacting info@jpf.org.uk. Unfortunately we are unable to provide sign language interpreting.

Photo Credit: Chris Parkes

Photo Credit: Chris Parkes
 
The research project between Stopgap Dance Company and the Japanese artists, Yukio Suzuki and Kenta Kambara is supported by the Japan Foundation through the Performing Arts Japan for Europe grant programme. Photo Credit: Chris Parkes

The research project between Stopgap Dance Company and the Japanese artists, Yukio Suzuki and Kenta Kambara is supported by the Japan Foundation through the Performing Arts Japan for Europe grant programme. 

Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To book your place via Eventbrite, please click here. If you have any accessibility requirements please let us know when booking by contacting info@jpf.org.uk. Unfortunately we are unable to provide sign language interpreting.

Back to Top

Author's Talk: Satoshi Kitamura   org

One of the UK's most admired children's authors, Satoshi Kitamura has been winning the hearts of children (and adults) for over three decades with his lovingly drawn animations and wonderfully imaginative books. Despite no formal training, Kitamura's first book, Angry Arthur, published in the UK by Andersen Press and with words by Hiawyn Oram, earned him the prestigious Mother Goose Award. His quirky characters, bewildering beasts, and lovingly-detailed landscapes have made Kitamura's style iconic and beloved by many. As an author and translator, Kitamura has been behind many famous books such as, Millies Marvellous Hats, Me and My Cat, and David Mckee's Elmer. His new book, Hat Tricks (ScallywagPress), will be released next year. 

In partnership with The Children's Bookshow, the Japan Foundation will welcome Kitamura back to the UK to talk about his career as both an author and an illustrator, as well as his unique writing and artistic style. He will also discuss the world of children's books in the UK and Japan and what inspires both young readers and himself. 

He will be introducing his lively and fascinating characters through live painting and Kamishibai, a traditional Japanese storytelling theatre style which uses illustrated paper for visual aids. 


Date: 11 October 2018 from 6.30pm
Venue:

House of Illustration, 2 Granary Square, London, N1C 4BH


This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To book your place via Eventbrite please click here

In adition his London talk, Kitamura will also be making other UK appearances:

8 October Warwick Art Centre (Visit their website for details)

12 October The Lake International Comic Art Festival  (Visit their website for details)

This Event is organised with The Children's Bookshow

In Partnership with The Lake International Comic Art Festival

Back to Top

Van Gogh & Japan: The Provence Years   org

For Van Gogh, Japan held great appeal, particularly its woodblock prints. In 1888 he left Paris and headed south, to the city of Arles in Provence. In its clear light, he developed as a landscape artist under the inspiration of Japanese artists. On his arrival, he wrote that “I feel I’m in Japan”.

Join Van Gogh specialist, Martin Bailey, author of Starry Night: Van Gogh in the Asylum and co-curator of Tate’s forthcoming Van Gogh exhibition (27 March-11 August 2019), will talk about his discoveries about the artist’s period in Provence—with a particular emphasis on his love for Japanese prints.


Date: 30 January 2019 from 6.45pm
Venue:

Asia House

63 New Cavendish Street

London

W1G 7LP


For more information, please click here.

The event is organised in collaboration with The Courtauld Institute of Art and Japan Foundation.

Back to Top

The Expression of Youth: Japanese Street Fashion in Post-War Culture   org

Thanks to its uniqueness, Japanese street fashion has made a name for itself in the couture world and has enjoyed global attention. Subcultures such as Cosplay, Lolita, and Gothic Lolita have been capturing imagination of people not only in Japan, but across America, Europe and the rest of Asia since the end of the 20th century and into the 21st century. Under what conditions, however, was such a unique fashion born and nurtured in Japan? How has fashion reflected the demands of the consumers, especially the young, trend setting generation?

In this special talk, Hiroshi Narumi, Professor of Kyoto University of Arts and Design, and the author of numerous books on contemporary fashion including Feel and Think: A New Era of Tokyo Fashion, will trace the fashion that emerged on the streets of Tokyo from 1945 up to the present day and examine how the desires of young people to express themselves have evolved over time. He will also discuss the role these trend setters have played in the creation of a unique and sometimes rather idiosyncratic mode, questioning what the heart of Japanese Post-War culture was. 


Date: 7 November 2018 from 6.45pm
Venue:

Royal Society of Arts, Durham House Street, London, WC2N 6HG


This event is free to attend but booking is essential. This is event is currently waiting list only, please click here to joing the waiting list.

Back to Top

Artist Talk: Aida Makoto   org

Aida Makoto is a Japanese contemporary artist known for his provocative work. From mountains of dead salarymen, a blender full of young women, and harakiri (ritual suicide), his highly skilled workmanship shared with Japanese traditional paintings appear grotesque at first, but they tend to carry a scathing message towards contemporary culture and society. 

Controversial though they may be, his works have been taken up by many prestigious exhibitions including his solo show at Mori Art Museum, Tokyo and have proved to be food for thought for its viewers. In addition to being an artist, he has also received respect for his novels and manga work as well as being involved in a number of art projects in Japan. 

For this special talk, Makoto Aida will talk about his long standing career as an artist, introducing his remarkable body of work. Together with Lena Fritsch, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Ashmolean Museum (University of Oxford), they will discuss what it is that Aida wishes to deliver through the various media he uses and what art means to him, reflecting on the state of Japan as well as global art. 

This is a rare opportunity to meet and hear from one of the leader artists from Japan who will stir your mind with his bold yet deeply profound art. 


Date: 19 October 2018 from 6.30pm
Venue:

Banqueting Suite (Chelsea College of Arts), 16 John Islip Street, London, SW1P 4JU


This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To book your place via Eventbrite please click here 

 

Header Image Left:
Picture of Waterfall 2007-2010.
Photo: Fukunaga Kazuo
Collection of National Museum of Art, Osaka
© Aida Makoto, Courtesy Mizuma Art Gallery

Header Image Bottom Right:
A Picture of an Air Raid on New York City (War Picture Returns) 1996.
photo: Nagatsuka Hideto. 
Takahashi Collection
© Aida Makoto, Courtesy Mizuma Art Gallery

Back to Top

Tanaka Kinuyo: Nation, Stardom and Female Subjectivity   org

Join the Japan Foundation for a series of events celebrating the publication of "Tanaka Kinuyo: Nation, Stardom, and Female Subjectivity" a look at the legendary actor and of the first prominent female film directors in Japan. 

A Screening of two of her films, The Wandering Princess and The Ballad or Narayama will be shown in London will accompany a book presentation event. For this book presentation and discussion, Dr Irene González-López and Dr Michael Smith as well as Dr Alexander Jacoby, Alejandra Armendáiz-Hernández and Prof. Ayako Saito (From Japan) will explore the life and achievements of Kinuyo Tanaka, one of the most celebrated stars in the history of Japanese cinema and as a female film maker.

There will be an opportunity to purchase the book, "Tanaka Kinuyo: Nation, Stardom and Female Subjectivity" after the event. Payment by cash only

 

The Wandering Princess:
Date:
29 November 2018 from 6:30pm
Venue: Prince Charles Cinema, 7 Leicester Pl, London, WC2N 6EZ

Book Presentation and Discussion:
Date: 30 November 2018 from 7:00pm (Doors from 6:30pm)