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セカンダリー日本語教師のためのワークショップ - Online Workshop for Secondary School Teachers: How do we equip our students with 21st century skills new
[Online Talk] Art In Motion - Creatives Who Have Transitioned to Video Artistry new
[Online Talk] The Pursuit for New Aesthetics - An Architectural Talk with HIRANO Toshiki new
[Online Event] Delving Into ' Grave of the Fireflies' with Alex Dudok de Wit new
Applications for the Japanese Local Project Support Programme 2021-2022 are open! new
Local Project Support Programme 2021-2022 Online Seminar and Q&A Session – Applications Open! new
11 Stories on Distanced Relationships: Contemporary Art From Japan - An Online Exhibition new

セカンダリー日本語教師のためのワークショップ - Online Workshop for Secondary School Teachers: How do we equip our students with 21st century skills   org

Calling all secondary school teachers of Japanese! We will be holding an online workshop led by two of the authors of a popular textbook series for secondary pupils.

This workshop introduces the pedagogical benefits of using 'iiTomo' series (2nd edition) (https://www.pearson.com.au/educator/secondary/browse-resources-online/resources-for-languages/japanese/iitomo/) which aims to equip students with 21st century skills in a variety of ways. Participants will experience intercultural language learning through the eyes of students and teachers. The workshop includes group work to share ideas of assessment tasks and new online tools for formative assessment.

- Date: 26th June 2021 (Saturday), 9:00-11:00 (BST)

- Location: Online seminar using Zoom software

- To apply, please click here: https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/3PPPWL/

- Participation fee: Free (Registration in advance is required.)

- Registration deadline: 10th June

- Languages used: Japanese/English

- Speaker: Ms Yoko Nishimura-Parke and Ms Yoshie Burrows

- Target audience: Secondary school teachers of Japanese (Private tutors are also welcome).

- Maximum number of participants: 50

In case that we receive more applications than we have spaces, we will prioritise applicants who are currently teaching GCSE Japanese in the United Kingdom and we might close the applications earlier than the deadline if capacity is reached.

- Planned schedule: Following the workshop, there will be an optional social gathering from 10:30.

Speakers’ Profiles:

Ms Yoko Nishimura-Parke

As a senior education officer at the NSW Department of Education, Australia, Yoko Nishimura-Parke developed numerous language learning resources for language education during the period 1998-2015. Yoko also co-authored the Japanese language textbook series Mirai (1995‐2006) and iiTomo (2008‐2019), published by Pearson Education Australia. Yoko is actively involved in creating language learning resources to foster ethical and intercultural understanding and cultivate global views focusing on sustainability.   

Ms Yoshie Burrows

Yoshie Burrows, lead author of the iiTomo series, has been actively involved in Japanese education in Victoria for more than twenty-five years. This includes a long career at Loreto College as a Year 7-12 teacher and language department coordinator. Since 2015, she has been the Languages Professional Learning Community Leader for the Catholic Education Office at Ballarat Diocese. She has written VCE teaching materials including the Leading Edge VCE Japanese textbook, as well as practice exams for the Melbourne Centre for Japanese Language Education.


Date: 26 June 2021 from 9.00am to 11.00am

Online event.

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[Online Talk] Art In Motion - Creatives Who Have Transitioned to Video Artistry   org

 

Since its emergence in the late 1960s, video artistry has been gaining an increasingly prominent position in the visual arts sphere, forming a key element in many independent and large-scale exhibitions worldwide. Setting itself apart from conventional filmmaking, its unique way of conveying a particular vision or message has been adopted by many artists, including those who do not necessarily begin their career with motion image.

So, what is the attraction of video art from the artists’ perspective? Is it easier to create in its infinite variety and in the current times which heavily rely on digital alternatives? Perhaps it provides a greater medium for expression?

In conjunction with the Japan Foundation’s online exhibition, 11 Stories on Distanced Relationships - Contemporary Art from Japan (which ran 30 March - 5 May 2021), we have invited three of the exhibited artists,  who are either based in or closely connected to the UK, and who began their careers with other media of expression but later adopted moving image.

The three artists are NOGUCHI Rika whose main medium is photography but who recently started incorporating video art, YANAI Shino who produces performances and installations mostly in video, and SAWA Hiraki who studied sculpture but is known for his videos which capture his subject’s full psychological territory. Together they will talk us through their individual relationships with video art and what inspired them to select this medium in their conceptualisations, while introducing some of their representative works. The conversation will be led by Stuart Tulloch, curator and Head of Programme at Firstsite.

 

About the speakers

Stuart Tulloch is Head of Programme at Firstsite, Colchester (www.firstsite.uk). Previously Curator at Ikon Gallery, Birmingham (2012 – 2014) and Curator Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool (2003 – 2012). Between 1999 – 2003, Stuart was an Assistant Exhibition Organiser at Hayward Gallery, London.  At Hayward he was part of the team that organised the major exhibition of contemporary Japanese art entitled Facts of Life, in 2001. He has since led solo exhibition presentations and projects by Shimabuku (Ikon, 2013) and Makoto Nomura (Grundy, 2004). He is currently leading a mayor project of new work by celebrated artist Michael Landy for Firstsite opening June 2021 - Welcome to Essex.

NOGUCHI Rika, born in 1971, lives and works in Okinawa Prefecture. NOGUCHI has been using the media of the photograph as a means to visualize “What is there, but invisible.” Recently she has also been working on video art focusing on subjects such as insects and plants. Major recent solo exhibitions include At the Bottom of the Sea (Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo, 2017) and To the Night Planet (Loock Gallery, Berlin, 2016). Group exhibitions include Twinkling Skin, Emission of Light by Life and Death (Ashikaga Museum of Art, Tochigi, 2020), and 21st Sydney Biennale SUPERPOSITION: Art of Equilibrium and Engagement (Sydney, Australia, 2018).

YANAI Shino lives and works in London. YANAI has produced performances and installations mostly in video and sound that explore through fieldwork the brutality inherent in beauty and socially or historically disguised violence. Recently, she has been interested in pathways and relics. Major recent solo exhibitions include The Deep End (Sagacho Archives, Tokyo, 2019) and Blue Passages (White Conduit Projects, London, 2016). Group exhibitions include 'de-sport: The Deconstruction and Reconstruction of Sports through Art (21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, 2020) and What We See (The National Museum of Art, Osaka, 2013).

SAWA Hiraki is based in London and the Ishikawa Prefecture. SAWA creates videos that capture his subject’s full psychological territory, including mental landscapes and memories. In recent years, he has worked on installations that combine an axis of video with three- and two-dimensional works. Major exhibitions include Overlapping Circles: 5 Artists Collaborate with the Collection (Kawamura Memorial DIC Museum of Art, Chiba, 2020), KAAT Exhibition 2018: Hiraki Sawa (solo exhibition–Kanagawa Arts Theatre, Kanagawa, 2018), Under the Box, Beyond the Bounds (solo exhibition–Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery, Tokyo, 2014) and the 17th Sydney Biennale (Sydney, Australia, 2010).

 

Please note that this will be an Online Event held on Zoom.

 

This online event is free to attend but places are limited and registration is essential. To reserve your space, please book your ticket here: 

https://bit.ly/3dFBoKb


Date: 25 May 2021 from 1.00pm

For more information, please click here.

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[Online Talk] The Pursuit for New Aesthetics - An Architectural Talk with HIRANO Toshiki   org

 

HIRANO Toshiki is an architectural designer based in Tokyo, Japan. Having studied under the globally acclaimed architect TAKAMATSU Shin, his talent began to be recognised abroad when he was awarded the Suzanne Kolarik Underwood Prize upon receiving his Master of Architecture degree from Princeton University in 2012. HIRANO aims to lend his distinct style to landmarks on an international scale as, in addition to his design work in Japan, he has been a pivotal creative voice involved in project proposals and design competitions such as for the Abu Dhabi Flamingo Visitor Center and the Aalto Museum Extension in Jyvaskyla, Finland. His work is frequently featured in public exhibitions such as his Malformed Objects at the Yamamoto Gendai, Tokyo in 2017. He teaches at the University of Tokyo and currently serves as a co-director of SEKISUI HOUSE - KUMA LAB by KUMA Kengo.

Ahead of the London Design Biennale 2021 in June, in which HIRANO will be representing Japan with his latest installation project Reinventing Texture supported by the Japan Foundation, we are proud to welcome him at an online talk event where he will discuss his defining projects including the work he will be presenting at the Biennale. HIRANO will also explore what he considers to be the new architectural aesthetic, as well as how his creative philosophy has and does determine his architectural activities. His presentation will be followed by fellow architect and co-founder of Pareid, Déborah Lopez, and will be moderated by Sarah Mineko Ichioka, director of Desire Lines (Singapore).

 

About the guest speakers

HIRANO Toshiki is an architectural designer based in Tokyo, Japan. He teaches at the University of Tokyo and currently serves as a co-director of SEKISUI HOUSE - KUMA LAB. His research and work investigate the new aesthetics in architecture drawing inspirations from digital technology, art and philosophy. His latest installation project "Reinventing Texture”, curated by Clare Farrow Studio, will be exhibited at Somerset House for the London Design Biennale 2021.

Website: toshiki-hirano.com

 

Sarah Mineko Ichioka, Hon FRIBA, leads Desire Lines, a strategic consultancy for environmental, cultural and social-impact organisations and initiatives. She has been recognised as a World Cities Summit Young Leader, one of the Global Public Interest Design 100, and a British Council / Clore Foundation Cultural Leadership International Fellow. She has advised initiatives including the European Prize for Urban Public Space, Aga Khan Award for Architecture, and Milan Triennale. Ichioka is a co-curator of the Singapore Pavilion at the 2021 Venice Biennale of Architecture, and co-author, with Michael Pawlyn, of 'Flourish: Design Paradigms for Our Planetary Emergency' (forthcoming 2021).

Déborah Lopez is a licensed architect in Spain and co-founder of Pareid; an interdisciplinary design and research studio currently located in London. Her work adopts approaches from various fields and contexts, addressing topics related to climate, ecology, human perception, machine sentience, and their capacity for altering current modes of existence through imminent fictions (if). Currently, she is a Lecturer (Teaching) at the Bartlett, UCL in London where she co-leads Research Cluster 1 and 20  under the title of ‘Monumental Wastelands’. She has been recently awarded the Arquia Innova Award by Fundación Arquia and her work has been featured in different international institutions and exhibitions such as the Royal Academy of Arts, Centre Pompidou, the Seoul Biennale and the Venice Biennale.

 

Reinventing Texture by Toshiki Hirano in collaboration with MA Interior Design at the Royal College of Art and MSCTY Studio.

Curated by Clare Farrow, Interdisciplinary Curator and Writer, Clare Farrow Studio.

Sponsored by KP Acoustics and supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, by the Japan Foundation and by Arts Council Tokyo.

The Biennale will run from 1-27 June and can be experienced in person and also digitally through the London Design Biennale website.

 

Please note that this will be an Online Event held on Zoom.

 

This online event is free to attend but places are limited and registration is essential. To reserve your space, please book your ticket here

 


Date: 3 June 2021 from 1.00pm

For more information, please click here.

         

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[Online Event] Delving Into ' Grave of the Fireflies' with Alex Dudok de Wit   org

 

It is probably not an overstatement to say that many view the films produced by Studio Ghibli to be the gateway for the Japanese animation craze gaining traction across the globe. Easily accessible in foreign countries and boasting universally engaging and uplifting storylines, works like Spirited Away or My Neighbour Totoro directed by Hayao MIYAZAKI have become household names worldwide. However, the contributions of the other creative giant for Studio Ghibli, Isao TAKAHATA, have sometimes slipped under the radar; in particular those works with storylines which cannot necessarily be classed as fantasy or family friendly. One such film is Grave of the Fireflies, directed by TAKAHATA and based on an autobiographical story by NOSAKA Akiyuki. The film follows two Japanese children orphaned by a catastrophic air raid in Kobe, portraying their struggle to survive the last days of the Second World War with an unflinching realism rarely seen in animation. But why has this film been left out of the frenzied consumption of Studio Ghibli’s works?

In conjunction with the release of the first book-length study of the film in English, Grave of the Fireflies (BFI Film Classics) in May, we invite the author, Alex Dudok de Wit, a journalist with expertise on Japanese anime, to explore his findings and the significance of this title. With critical analysis contextualised by the film’s production background, he will focus on Isao TAKAHATA’s contribution to the animation genre, moving away from the more common spotlight on Hayao MIYAZAKI’s work. His presentation, which will include live reading of short passages from the book, will be followed by a conversation with Dr YOSHIOKA Shiro, lecturer in Japanese Studies at Newcastle University, who specialises in MIYAZAKI and Studio Ghibli’s animation.

 

‘Grave of the Fireflies’ by Alex Dudok de Wit will be published by Bloomsbury on 6 May (ISBN 9781838719241) as part of the BFI Film Classics series. 

 

We are pleased to share an exclusive discount code for our subscribers and event attendees which can be applied when purchasing your own copy from bloomsbury.com

To take advantage of this offer, please visit the official purchase site here, and enter code ‘GOTFJF’ at check out for 25% off and free shipping. Expires 25 June 2021.

Please note that any transactions carried out on bloomsbury.com fall under the merchant’s responsibility and any questions or issues related to a purchase should be directed to them.

 

About the guest speakers

Alex Dudok de Wit is a journalist who writes chiefly about the art and business of animation. He is the Associate Editor at Cartoon Brew, the most widely read animation news site, and an animation correspondent for Sight & Sound, the magazine of the British Film Institute. His writing has also appeared on the BBC and in Vulture, Little White Lies, The Telegraph, The i, The Independent, Time Out, and Index on Censorship. His first book, Grave of the Fireflies (BFI Film Classics), was published by Bloomsbury on May 6.

YOSHIOKA Shiro is lecturer in Japanese Studies of Newcastle University. His main research interest is Japanese popular culture, especially anime. He has published articles and book chapters on Ghibli, Miyazaki and Takahata in English and Japanese, and is currently working on a monograph on Miyazaki, which overviews his life and career focusing on how he came to be seen as an auteur and quasi-intellectual. Besides Miyazaki and Ghibli, recently he is interested in how fans experience anime beyond the texts in various ways such as ‘pilgrimage’ to the locales.

 

 

Please note that this will be an Online Event held on Zoom.

 

This online event is free to attend but registration is essential.

To reserve your space, please book your ticket here.

 


Date: 26 May 2021 from 6.30pm

For more information, please click here.

Celebrating:

 

Ghibli Double Bill!

If you’re interested in this event, you might enjoy the below event

hosted by our New York office:

Exporting Studio Ghibli: The Road to Worldwide Recognition

Date: 27 May, 7:00pm (BST)

Online Zoom event. Book here.

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Applications for the Japanese Local Project Support Programme 2021-2022 are open!   org

Institutions can apply for up to £3000 for non-profit-making projects or activities which promote Japanese language education in the UK. Please check out our website for information on the type of projects we support, such as newly introducing Japanese into the curriculum or funding Japanese clubs.

 

We prioritise projects that fit into the following four categories:

 

1. Newly introducing Japanese into the curriculum

 

Up to £3,000 for projects that promote the introduction of Japanese into the curriculum (or onto the main school timetable) at primary and secondary schools. This grant covers staff costs and the cost of Japanese language books. Projects may take place online or offline.

 

2. Supporting GCSE or A-level courses

 

Up to £3,000 for projects that support GCSE or A-level courses. Particularly, if schools/organisations require support to ensure a large number of candidates are able to take formal qualifications in Japanese, they will be able to maintain their project by re-applying the following year. This means organisations will be able to apply for up to a total of £6,000 over two years. (Please note that we do not supplement the salary of teacher(s) already hired by the applying organisation.)  Covers staff costs and costs of Japanese language books. Projects may take place online or offline.

 

3. Japanese clubs

 

Up to £2,000 for organisations that newly introduce Japanese as an extracurricular activity or enrichment subject. In the case of schools, this is even if this is not within the school timetable. Covers staff cost, Japanese language book cost, origami cost and calligraphy cost. Clubs may take place online or offline.

 

4. Projects that enable links between primary/secondary institutions and institutions of higher education

 

Up to £3,000 for projects that strengthen connections between secondary institutions and institutions of higher education and create and/or strengthen networks among pupils, students, and teachers for the purpose of helping to promote Japanese language education in the UK. These projects can be aimed at both potential learners of Japanese and people who already are learning Japanese. This is a recently added category, so please contact us if you have any questions or would like to apply but are unsure as to whether your project is suitable. These projects may take place online or offline.

 

The application deadline for the 2021-22 programme is 28th May.

 

This year’s first funding deadline is 28th May – so please get your applications in by that date!

 

Download the following three documents by clicking on the “attachment” links at the end of this article:

 

-       - The General Information document.

 

-       -  The Application Form.

 

-        -  The Grant Flowchart

 


Date: 4 May 2021 - 28 May 2021
Download 2021-22 Flowchart
Download 2021-22 Application Form
Download 2021-22 General Information

We will also be holding a seminar on 14th May (Friday) providing application guidance. Find out more here: https://jpf.org.uk/whatson.php#1175 

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Local Project Support Programme 2021-2022 Online Seminar and Q&A Session – Applications Open!   org

Are you considering applying for funding but aren’t sure about how to go about it? Do you have a project in mind but aren’t sure if it’s eligible? We would strongly recommend that you sign up to take part in our Online Seminar and Q&A session.

During this one-hour session, a member of our staff will talk participants through the application process, and then open the floor to questions and answers. We want to make sure the application process is as easy-to-understand as possible.

This session will be held twice on 14th May 2021 (Friday).

1. First Session: 13:00 to 14:00

2. Second Session: 18:00 to 19:00

We will be using Zoom software. Once you have applied we will send you information on how to join the session.

If you would like to take part, please sign up 12th May (Wednesday).

o   Apply for a place for Session 1 by filling out our Eventbrite Form here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/152709005747

o   Apply for a place for Session 2 by filling out our Eventbrite Form here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/152710070933

If you are unable to attend either session but are still interested in applying, please do not worry! We will be making a recording of the first part of the seminar (explanation of application process) and uploading it to our Youtube channel.

 


Date: 14 May 2021

You can find information on the programme as well as links to download an application form here: https://jpf.org.uk/whatson.php#1174

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11 Stories on Distanced Relationships: Contemporary Art From Japan - An Online Exhibition   org

 

The Japan Foundation is pleased to present an online exhibition 11 Stories on Distanced Relationships: Contemporary Art from Japan as an endeavour to build a new framework for art exchange adapted to our reality with the coronavirus.

The spread of the pandemic has meant that since last year it has been difficult for people and goods to move around the globe, and as a result many international cultural exchange projects planned by the Foundation were cancelled. In this age of uncertainty, online forums have rapidly developed as places for communication, and everyone is having to reappraise their “distance” from their surrounds. This exhibition emerged from the question of how, in this context, we might go about building connections with the world. It is first ever exhibition of contemporary art to be held solely online by the Japan Foundation.

The exhibition introduces the work of 11 Japanese and Japan-based contemporary artists, centred on new pieces commissioned on the theme of “translating distance.” Psychological or physical distances have never been easy to reach across, or reduce. Nowadays distance has emerged as something we must learn to live with. This exhibition has been created to deliver works that earnestly address this kind of distance – from Japan to people everywhere in the world. We hope that everyone, wherever they may be, will enjoy it.

 

The Artists:

 

ARAKI Yu, HAN Ishu, IIYAMA Yuki, KOIZUMI Meiro, MOHRI Yuko, NOGUCHI Rika, OKUMURA Yuki, SATO Masaharu, SAWA Hiraki, YANAI Shino, YOSHIDA Shinya

 

For detailed information and to view the exhibition, please visit:

https://11stories.jpf.go.jp/en/ 


Date: 30 March 2021 - 5 May 2021

For more information, please click here.
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